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Full text of "Town Report"

LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY, MASS. 



3 4864 00275 4843 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 1951 

ALSO 

THE REPORT OF THE 

SCHOOL AND OTHER COMMITTEES 

FOR THE YEAR 1951 




NEWTON 
GARDEN CITY PRINT, Inc. 

1952 



V 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Assessors, Report of 60 

Auditor, Report of 102 

Bemis Lectures 157 

Board of Appeals, Report of 144 

Building Code Committee, Report of 152 

Division of Inspectors, Report of 151 

Cemetery Commissioners, Report of 132 

Civil Defense Agency, Report of 160 

Collector of Taxes, Report of 84 

deCordova and Dana Museum, Report of Directors 46 

Finance Committee, Report of 51 

Fire Engineers, Report of 134 

Health, Board of, Report of 128 

Library, Report of Trustees of 138 

Statistics 139 

Lincoln Recreation Committee, Report of 149 

Lincoln School Building Committee, Report of 162 

Memorial Day Committee, Report of 153 

Middlesex County Extension Service, Report of 146 

Nursing Committee, Report of . 136 

Old Age Assistance, Report of 44 

Planning Board, Report of 140 

Police Department, Report of 158 

Revise Town By-Laws, Committee to, Report of . •. 156 

School Committee, Report of 163 

Expenditures 186 

Graduating Class of 1951 187 

School Calendar 165 

School Committee, Report of 166 

School Enrollment 183 

School Nurse, Report of 180 

School Personnel 188 

School Superintendent, Report of 168 

Selectmen, Report of 41 

State Auditor, Report of 105 

Streets, Superintendent of, Report of 123 

Town Clerk, Report of 11 

Annual Meeting, March 5, 1951, Proceedings at 11 

Births 36 

Deaths 40 

Juror List for 1951 35 

Marriages 38 

Special Town Meeting, June 11, 1951 31 

Town Election, March 10, 1951 28 

Town Officers, List of 4 

Treasurer, Report of 85 

Tree Warden, Report of 148 

Trust Funds Commissioners, Report of 112 

Union Health Committee, Report of 154 

Warrant of 1952 189 

Water Commissioners, Report of 124 



4 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1951 



Term Expires 
Moderator 

DONALD P. DONALDSON 1954 

Town Clerk 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1952 

Selectmen and Board of Public Welfare 

JOHN O. WILSON (Chairman) 1952 

EDMUND W. GILES 1953 

HENRY DeC. WARD 1954 

Assessors 

DAVID B. YOUNG (Chairman) . 1952 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, JR 1953 

ARTHUR W. RICE 1954 

Treasurer 

FREDERICK B. TAYLOR 1952 

Collector of Taxes 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1953 

Auditor 

PEARSON HUNT 1952 

School Committee 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON (Chairman) 1953 

KENNETH C. FARNSWORTH 1952 

LUCY E. BYGRAVE 1954 

Water Commissioners 

SUMNER SMITH (Chairman) . . 1953 

ROBERT W. SCOTT 1954 

HENRY WARNER 1952 

Board of Health 

GORDON A. DONALDSON (Chairman) ..... 1952 

WARREN F. FLINT . 1953 

NANCY D. HURD 1954 

Tree Warden 

JOHN W. GILBERT. ............. 1952 



TOWN OFFICERS 5 

Term Expires 

Cemetery Commissioners 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM (Chairman) 1953 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON 1954 

ELIZABETH H. DOHERTY 1952 

Planning Board 

WILLIAM T. KING (Chairman) 1953 

EVELETH R. TODD . -. 1952 

ALAN McCLENNEN 1954 

HOWARD SNELLING 1955 

RICHARD J. EATON 1956 

Measurer of Wood and Bark 

HAROLD S. COUSINS 1952 

JOSEPH R. TRACEY . 1952 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 

CLEMENT C. SAWTELL (Chairman) 1952 

LEONARD C. LARRABEE 1954 

HENRY DeC. WARD 1953 

Trustees of Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures 

MABEL H. TODD (Chairman) 1953 

LEONARD C. LARRABEE 1954 

CHRISTOPHER W. HURD 1952 

Trustees of Lincoln Library 

ROLAND C. MacKENZIE (Chairman) 

GEORGE G. TARBELL 

ALICE G. MERIAM 

JOHN O. WILSON (Chairman Selectmen ex-officio) 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON (Chairman School Committee ex-officio) 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park 

A. Directors 

CHARLES H. BLAKE 1953 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING 1954 

JANE K. VANCE 1955 

JOHN Q. ADAMS 1952 

B. Directors 

RICHARD S. MERIAM — appointed by Library Trustees . . 1952 

PEARSON HUNT — appointed by School Committee . . . 1953 

ARTHUR E. THIESSEN — appointed by Selectmen . . . 1954 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Term Expires 

Clerk of Selectmen 
M. ELIZABETH CAUSER 1952 

Superintendent of Streets 

THOMAS F. COAN (Deceased) 

CLIFFORD H. BRADLEY (Acting Supt.) . . . . . 1952 

Chief of Police 
LEO J. ALGEO 1952 

Police Officer 
LAWRENCE P. HALLETT 1952 

Constables 

LEO J. ALGEO 1952 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT . . 1952 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 1952 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM 1952 

Dog Officers 

LEO J. ALGEO 1952 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT 1952 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
LEO J. ALGEO 1952 



Special Police 



JOHN T. ALGEO 
BOB BERNSON 
ROBERT H. BOOTH 
FLORIY CAMPOBASSO 
JOSEPH CAMPOBASSO 
JOHN COOK 
HENRY J. DAVIS 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE 
JAMES DIAMOND 
WILLIAM DOHERTY 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 
JOSEPH FRAZIER 
JOHN GILBERT 



FRANCIS T. GILBERT 
FRANK GORDON 
HARRY B. KNOWLES 
ROBERT H. MORRIS 
WARREN RICE 
EDWARD D. ROONEY 
DANIEL RYAN 
SUMNER SMITH 
FRANCIS J. SMITH 
JOSEPH TRACEY 
HENRY WARNER 
ORRIN C. WOOD 



TOWN OFFICERS 7 

Term Expires 

Fire Engineers 

EDMUND W. GILES 1952 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1952 

CHARLES K. FITTS . . 1952 

Forest Warden 

EDMUND W. GILES 1952 

Deputy Forest Warden 
JOSEPH TRACEY 1952 

Petroleum Inspector 
EDMUND W. GILES . 1952 

Director of Civil Defense 
ROBERT H. BOOTH . 1952 

Building Inspector 

NORMAN F. BRISSON {Resigned) 

NILS SWANSON '. . 1952 

Plumbing Inspector 

MANNING W. MacRAE 1952 

Wiring Inspector 
WILLIAM DEAN . . 1952 

Board of Appeals 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL {Chairman) 1956 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE {Secretary) 1955 

D. EVERETT SHERMAN, JR 1952 

HENRY B. HOOVER 1953 

ANDREW J. O'REILLY 1954 

Associate Members 

ARTHUR W. RICE 1952 

THOMAS B. ADAMS 1954 

Registrars of Voters 

MANLEY B. BOYCE 1952 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1953 

HENRY J. DAVIS .... 1954 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS {Town Clerk ex-officio) 



8 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Term Expires 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER 1952 

MARIAN N. OBER 1952 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 1952 

Member of District Nursing Committee 
ALBERTA A. FRADD 1952 

Fence Viewers 

THOMAS F. COAN {Deceased) 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 1952 

Field Drivers 

DAVID B. SPOONER . 1952 

WILLIAM R. DOHERTY 1952 

Surveyor of Cord Wood 
HAROLD S. COUSINS 1952 

Recreation Committee 

ETHAN A. MURPHY {Chairman) 1952 

WILLIAM DeFORD 1952 

ASTRID L. DONALDSON 1952 

JOHN B. GARRISON 1952 

ROBERT W. GRAY 1952 

E. DONLAN ROONEY 1952 

SADIE J. SHERMAN 1952 

DAVID TODD 1952 

Veteran's Agent 

EDMUND W. GILES ..-".'- 1952 

Caretaker of Town Hall and Library 
ORRIN C. WOOD 1952 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

Assistant Treasurer 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER . . .. 1952 



TOWN OFFICERS 9 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Term Expires 

Community Nurse 
MARIAN N. OBER . 1952 

Burial Agent 
WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1952 

Inspector of Animals 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1952 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

Finance Committee 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO (Chairman) 1954 

LELAND A. WILDES (Secretary) . 1954 

WILLIAM N. PAGE 1952 

THOMAS J. ROUNER 1953 

PAUL L. NORTON . 1953 

Memorial Day Committee 

EDWARD D. ROONEY ELEANOR A. PALLOTTA 

BOB BERNSON ALICE G. MERIAM 

REV. CHARLES M. STYRON 

Building Code Committee 

NORMAN F. BRISSON WILLIAM M. DEAN 

ROBERT BYGRAVE MANNING W. MacRAE 

HENRY B. HOOVER 



Union Health Department 

NANCY D. HURD RICHARD K. CONANT 

JEAN MURPHY ELLIOTT R. HEDGE 

BRADFORD CANNON 

Revision of Town By-Laws 

SUMNER SMITH F. WINCHESTER DENIO HENRY WARNER 

School Building Needs 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 

PEARSON HUNT ELIZABETH J. SNELLING 

ROBERT M. KIMBALL 



10 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

CALENDAR 

SELECTMEN — Second and fourth Mondays of each month 8 P.M. at 

the Town House. Lincoln 6-0048. 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE — First Tuesday of each month 8 P.M. at 

the New Elementary School. Lincoln 6-0333. 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS — First Monday of each month 8 P.M. Town 

House. Lincoln 6-0048. 
WATER COMMISSIONERS — Meetings by appointment, call Sumner 

Smith, Lincoln 6-0213. 
BOARD OF HEALTH — Meetings by appointment, call Dr. Gordon 

Donaldson, Lincoln 6-0192. 
BOARD OF APPEALS — Meetings by appointment, call James De- 

Normandie, Clerk. Lincoln 6-01 63 W. 
PLANNING BOARD — Second Wednesday of each month 8 P.M. Town 

House. Lincoln 6-0048. 

Population — 2,339 by 1950 census. 

Town Area — 8,572 acres. 

1952 Tax Rate — $44.00 per $1,000 valuation. 

Annual Town Meeting — First Monday in March — March 3, 1952. 

Annual Election of Town Officers — Saturday following Town Meet- 
ing — March 8, 1952. 

Qualifications for Registration — Twelve months' continuous residence 
in the State of Massachusetts prior to March 3, 1952, and six months' 
continuous residence in the Town of Lincoln prior to March 3, 1952. 

Town Office open daily 9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M., Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 
12 noon. Closed Saturdays during June, July and August. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 11 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Monday, March 5, 1951 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called 
to order by the Moderator at 7:30 o'clock P.M., the return of 
the W 7 arrant was read, and the Moderator called attention to 
Article 1. (Election of Officers). 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees and other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Voted: That Harold S. Cousins and Joseph R. Tracey be 
elected Measurer's of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Voted: That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 
Commissioners and Trustees as printed in the Town Report 
be accepted. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 
any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to 
employ for additional compensation any of its members and to 
fix additional compensation of such members. 

Voted: That the salaries of the elected officers of the Town 
for the current year be fixed at the following amounts re- 
spectively : 

Selectmen each $200 00 Assessors Chairman $200 00 

Treasurer 200 00 Assessors other members each 175 00 

Collector of Taxes . . 1,600 00 Auditor 50 00 

Town Clerk 300 00 Water Commissioners each . . 75 00 

and that one or more Cemetery Commissioners be authorized 
to work on the Cemetery grounds at the rate of $1.00 per hour. 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the neces- 
sary and expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything 
in relation to the same. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate for General 
purposes the several sums for the several purposes set forth as 
Items 1 to 73 inclusive and the notes thereto, as shown on 



12 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

pages 63 to 68 inclusive in the Town of Lincoln Report for 
1950 and read to the meeting except that appropriation 
Item 52 be increased by $6,300.00 to $70,400.00, Item 54 be 
increased by $1,306.00 to $28,260.00; Item 55 be increased by 
$650.00 to $16,388.27; Item 66 be increased by $178.50 to 
$1,178.50; Item 69 be increased by $135.00 to $3,135.00. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Selectmen 

Salaries $600 00 

Clerk 1,760 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 540 00 $2,900 00 

Treasurer 

Salaries 400 00 

Clerical 150 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 193 00 743 00 

Collector of Taxes 

Salary 1,600 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 400 00 2,000 00 

Clerk 

Salary 300 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 60 00 360 00 

Assessors 

Salaries 550 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 881 00 1,431 00 

Auditor 

Salary 50 00 

Legal 

Counsel 500 00 

Election and Registration 

Salaries 250 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 330 00 580 00 

Town House 

Janitor 2,470 00 

Fuel 700 00 

Repairs 600 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 753 00 4,523 00 

Planning Consultant 150 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 200 00 350 00 

Finance Committee 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 30 00 

TOTAL FOR GENERAL GOVERNMENT $13,467 00 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 13 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
Police 

Salaries 6,300 00 

Car 400 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 1,825 00 8,525 00 

Fire Department 

Salaries. .' 300 00 

Labor at Fires 3,500 00 

Operation of Equipment 2,450 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 2,250 00 8,500 00 

Tree and Moth Department 

Insect Control 2,000 00 

Dutch Elm Disease Control 1,000 00 

Poison Ivy Control 500 00 3,500 00 

Board of Appeals 

Clerical 100 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 200 00 300 00 

Inspector of Building, Plumbing and 
Wiring 

Salaries and Transportation 500 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 50 00 550 00 

TOTAL FOR PROTECTION OF PERSONS 

AND PROPERTY $21,375 00 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salaries of Nurses 2,340 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 755 00 

Car 750 00 3,845 00 

Inspector of Animals 

Salary 100 00 

TOTAL FOR HEALTH AND SANITATION $3,945 00 

HIGHWAYS 

Chapter 90 13,000 00 

General Highway 

Wages 12,500 00 

Machinery 

Repairs and Maintenance 3,750 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 13,520 00 

Street Lights 5,800 00 

TOTAL FOR HIGHWAYS $48,570 00 



14 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

AID TO CITIZENS 

Old Age Assistance 26,000 00 

Aid to Dependent Children 500 00 

Public Welfare 500 00 

O.A.A. Administration 400 00 

Veteran's Aid 1,000 00 



TOTAL FOR AID TO CITIZENS $28,400 00 

EDUCATION 
Schools 

Salaries 70,400 00 

Transportation 13,721 73 

Tuition and Vocational Education 28,260 00 

Equipment, Supplies and Miscellaneous 16,388 27 

Library 

Salaries 2,950 00 

Books 800 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 850 00 

Repairs 225 00 



TOTAL FOR EDUCATION $133,595 00 

RECREATION 

Ball Field and Summer Playground 

Salaries and Wages 1,200 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 700 00 



TOTAL FOR RECREATION $1,900 00 

CEMETERIES 

Salaries, Maintenance and Interments. . 2,550 00 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 117 00 

Permanent Improvements 1,000 00 



TOTAL FOR CEMETERIES $3,667 00 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 1,497 00 

Town Reports 1,178 50 

Rent of Dump 200 00 

Insurance 3,700 00 

Rental of Hydrants • 3,135 00 

Reserve Fund 5,000 00 



TOTAL FOR UNCLASSIFIED $14,710 50 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 15 



TOWN DEBT 



Bonds 19,000 00 

Interest on Bonds 5,110 00 

Interest on Tax Notes 350 00 



TOTAL FOR TOWN DEBT $24,460 00 

TOTAL OF ABOVE RECOMMENDATIONS $294,089 50 

WATER WORKS RECOMMENDATIONS $28,425 00 

And that $1,343.00 of the appropriation under Item 30, be 
taken from the unexpended appropriation balance account of 
$1,343.00 for Fire Department Equipment; that $9,500.00 of 
the appropriation under Item 42 be taken from Free Cash and 
returned thereto when received from the State and County; 
that $218.01 of the appropriation under Item 55 for School 
Equipment and Supplies be taken from the $218.01 balance 
of the Julian deCordova School Equipment account and $17.35 
from the account designated "Gift" on the balance sheet; that 
the entire appropriation of $1,000.00 under Item 64 be taken 
from the Cemetery fund; that the entire appropriation of 
$5,000.00 under Item 70 be taken from overlay surplus and 
further Voted: that the sum of $28,425.00 appropriated for 
Water Works be taken from Water Works Treasury. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1951, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year 
in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen be authorized to borrow money from time to time 
in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
January 1, 1951 and to issue a note or notes therefor payable 
within one year and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 



16 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct services 
on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint a committee 
raise and appropriate money, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a com- 
mittee of five to plan and carry out exercises on Memorial Day, 
the thirtieth of May next and that the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of two hundred and twenty-five dollars ($225.00) 
for the use of such committee in connection with these exer- 
cises. Committee appointed: E. Donlan Rooney, Bob Bern- 
son, Eleanor A. Pallotta, Alice G. Meriam and Rev. Charles M. 
Styron. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will erect a memorial to the 
Dead of World War II appropriate or take any action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Voted: To postpone indefinitely. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $3,000.00 for the use of the Civil Defence 
Committee or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 for 
the use of the Civil Defence Committee said sum to be taken 
from Free Cash. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote for the Moderator 
to appoint a committee of five to investigate and study the 
provisions of Chapter 662, the Acts of 1949, the act relative to 
the organization of union health departments, and determine 
the desirability of Lincoln joining with one or more of the 
following towns: Acton, Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, Lexington, 
Maynard, Sudbury and Way land or others to form a union 
health department, this committee to report its findings to the 
next Town meeting; and that $100.00 be appropriated for the 
use of the committee. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee of five to 
investigate and study the provisions of Chapter 662, the Acts 
of 1949, the act relative to the organization of union health 
departments and determine the desirability of Lincoln joining 
with one or more of the following towns: Acton, Bedford, 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 17 

Carlisle, Concord, Lexington, Maynard, Sudbury and Way- 
land or others to form a union health department, this com- 
mittee to report its findings to the next Town meeting; and 
that $100.00 be appropriated for the use of the committee. 
Committee: Mrs. Nancy D. Hurd, Miss Jean Murphy, Mr. 
Richard K. Conant, Mr. Elliott R. Hedge and Dr. Brad- 
ford Cannon. 

Article 11. (The foregoing is a true copy of the main 
motion moved for adoption at the meeting). 

Art. 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By- 
Law by striking out Sections 2 to 23 inclusive, as amended, and 
substituting therefor the following Sections 2 to 15, inclusive: 
Section (2) Definitions 

In this by-law the following terms shall have meanings as de- 
scribed below: 

(a) Structure: An entire building, including appurtenances 
thereto, or any construction upon which human effort has 
been expended and which extends more than eight feet in 
length or breadth and seven feet in height, measuring to the 
extremities of all parts. 

(b) Dwelling: A structure, house, or building which is used or 
occupied in whole or part for residence. 

(c) Family: Any number of persons living together as a single 
economic unit. 

(d) One-Family dwelling: A dwelling designed for one family. 

(e) Two-Family dwelling: A dwelling designed for or occupied 
by two families. 

(f) Apartment house: A dwelling occupied by more than two 
families, or a structure occupied by one or more families 
above a first floor used for non-residential purposes. 

(g) Rooming or boarding house. A dwelling in which the fam- 
ily resident therein provides eating and/or sleeping accom- 
modations for not more than three paying guests. 

(h) Hotel or Lodging House: A structure or part thereof, or a 
group of structures on a single lot, where space is used for 
sleeping or feeding more than three persons as paying guests, 
regular or transient, 
(i) Lot: The whole area of a single parcel of land under one 
ownership. Whenever such a parcel is divided on a plan 
which has been recorded or filed at the Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds the term "lot" as used in this by-law 
shall mean a lot as shown on such plan ; or a lot may be de- 
fined as a single parcel on the plot plan accompanying appli- 
cation for a building permit. 



18 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

(j) Street: A public way, a way opened or dedicated to public 
use, or a way plotted and laid out for ultimate public use, 
whether or not constructed. 

(k) Street line: The sideline of a street or way, as determined by 
deeds and plans recorded at the Registry of Deeds ; where no 
line is thus legally established, then a line parallel with and 
twenty feet distant from the center line of a travelled way. 
(1) Use: The act of using land or structures, or where the con- 
text permits, the erection, construction, repair, enlargement, 
or alteration of a structure intended for use. 

(m) Accessory use: A use which in the Town of Lincoln is cus- 
tomarily incidental to the principal use to which it is acces- 
sory. 

(n) Non-conforming use: A legally existing use which does not 
conform to the zoning regulations for the district in which 
it is located. 

(o) Private garage: Covered space for the housing of motor ve- 
hicles, no more than two of which belong to others than the 
occupants of the lot on which such space is located. 

(p) Service station : A structure or lot used for the sale of gasoline 
and oil or for servicing or storing motor vehicles, other than 
a private garage. 

(q) Automobile repair shop: A shop or garage for the repair of 
motor vehicles, other than a private garage or service 
station. 

Section (3) Administration 

(a) The provisions of this by-law shall be administered and en- 
forced by the Inspector of Buildings. 

(b) No application of any kind shall be approved unless the 
plans, specifications and intended use set forth in said appli- 
cation conform in all respects with this by-law, or unless the 
applicant has secured a written permit from the Board of 
Appeals, pursuant to Section 1 1 below. 

(c) Any application for a new or altered use of land or structure 
shall be accompanied by a specific reference to the subject 
lot as recorded in the Registry of Deeds, or by two copies of 
a plan of the lot, drawn to scale, showing the entire recorded 
ownership, all existing structures, all abutting streets, and 
the exact area and boundaries of the parcel to be assigned to 
the subject use. A record of such application and plan shall 
be kept on file. 

Section (4) Zoning Districts 

(a) For the purpose of this by-law the Town of Lincoln is 
divided into 3 classes of districts, designated as follows: 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 19 

Single Residence Districts, 

General Residence Districts, 

Commercial Districts, 
(b) Said districts are established as shown, denned and bounded 
on the map accompanying this by-law, entitled Zoning Map 
of Lincoln, Mass., dated February 1, 1951, and filed with the 
Town Clerk. Said map and all explanatory matter thereon 
are herby made a part of this by-law. 

Section (5) Single Residence Districts 

In a single residence district no lot shall be used, and no struc- 
true shall be erected, maintained, altered, or used for any purposes 
other than the following, including accessory uses: 

(a) One-Family detached dwelling, provided that there shall be 
only one such dwelling per lot. 

(b) Rooming or boarding house. 

(c) Church, parish house, religious or denominational school, 
not conducted for profit. 

(d) Publicly operated building, school, park or area dedicated to 
municipal use or service. 

(e) Farm, greenhouse, nursery, truck garden: stand for sale of 
farm produce by a resident of Lincoln, provided that a major 
proportion of all products sold shall have been raised within 
the Town and provided further that space for customers' 
cars is available off the right-of-way of the street. 

(f ) Office or studio operated or maintained by a. person resident 
in the structure, or a customary home occupation conducted 
in a dwelling structure or accessory building by a resident, 
provided that not more than one person not resident in the 
structure is employed therein. In such cases one sign of not 
more than two square feet in area may be displayed. 

(g) Accessory uses, including private garage, private stable, or 
farm buildings used as part of the operation of a farm. 

(h) Subject to permission of the Board of Appeals, as provided 
in Section 11 below, the following: 

Private school, cemetery, hospital, sanatarium, nursing 
home, or charitable institution; use of land or structure 
by a public utility; community club not conducted for 
profit; conversion of a one-family dwelling existing at the 
time this by-law was originally adopted into a two-family 
dwelling, provided that the exterior appearance be not 
significantly altered, and provided further that the lot 
appurtenant to said dwelling have an area of at least 
60,000 square feet. 



20 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

(i) Subject to permission of the Board of Appeals, as provided 
in Section 11 below, a sand or gravel pit or the removal of 
soil, loam, sand or gravel from a property not in public use. 
In granting a permit therefor the Board shall specify such 
limitations and safeguards as it may deem appropriate. 
This provision shall not limit the removal of excess material 
from a property when such removal is incidental to the con- 
struction of an approved structure or street. 

Section (6) General Residence Districts 

Uses permitted in a general residence district shall be the follow- 
ing, and no others: 

(a) Any use permitted in a single residence district subject to 
the same restrictions as are prescribed therein. 

(b) Two-family dwelling, provided that there shall be only one 
detached dwelling per lot. 

Section (7) Commercial Districts 

Uses permitted in a commercial district shall be the following, 
and no others: 

(a) Any use permitted in a general residence district, including 
as a right those uses listed in Section 5h, and including sub- 
ject to permission of the Board of Appeals those uses listed 
in Section 5i. 

(b) Apartment house, hotel or lodging house. 

(c) Retail store or service establishment. 

(d) Business or professional office; bank. 

(e) Restaurant or other place for serving food. 

(f) Place of business of caterer, confectioner, decorator, dress- 
maker, optician, mortician, craftsman, or member of a 
building trade, and similar uses. 

(g) Service station, provided that repairs shall be limited to 
minor changes and adjustments, and provided that gasoline 
pumps and equipment shall be so located that vehicles can 
not be serviced unless they are entirely on the service station 
lot. 

(h) Automobile salesroom, provided that no display of vehicles 
for sale shall be permitted closer to the street line than the 
major structure on the same lot. 

(i) Sign or display advertising goods or services available on the 
lot, provided that no sign or display shall project beyond the 
street line, shall be illuminated other than by indirect white 
light, or shall have a gross area of more than 30 square feet. 

(j) Subject to permission of the Board of Appeals, as provided 
in Section 11 below, the following: 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 21 

Theatre, moving-picture house, bowling alley, skating 
rink or similar commercial amusement place, but not in- 
cluding outdoor moving picture or dancing establishments; 
Lumber, fuel, feed, or ice establishment; yard for the keep- 
ing of materials or equipment by contractor, landscape 
constructor, or landscape gardener; automobile repair 
shop. 

Light manufacturing and similar activities, provided that 
such proposed activities will not be offensive, injurious or 
noxious because of noise, vibration, smoke, fumes, dust, 
odors, danger of fire or explosion, or other characteristics 
detrimental to a dominantly residential town. 
Any permit granted under this subsection (j) shall be 
subject to the provision that no storage of materials ap- 
purtenant thereto shall be permitted between the street 
line and the front line of structures on the subject lot, or 
if there be no structure, within 40 feet of the street line. 

Section (8) Height Regulations 

(a) The maximum height of any structure in a single residence 
district shall be 35 feet or three stories. - 

(b) The maximum height of any structure in a general residence 
or commercial district shall be 30 feet or two and one-half 
stories. 

(c) In determining the height of structures any floor level shall 
be counted as a story if it is to be used in part for sleeping 
rooms, or if it is higher than three feet below the average 
ground level around the exterior walls of the structure. A 
half-story is that portion of a structure under a sloping roof, 
the cubic contents of which are never more than half of those 
of the story below; if the cubic contents are greater than 
half, it shall be deemed a story. Limitations of height shall 
not apply to chimneys, ventilators, skylights, towers, spires, 
tanks, silos and other features usually carried above roofs, if 
such features are in no way used for living purposes. 

Section (9) Area and Yard Regulations 

(a) Except as hereinafter specified, there shall be provided for 
each dwelling or other main structure or use a lot with a 
minimum area as follows : 

Area 
In single residence districts 40,000 sq. ft. 

In general residence districts 12,000 sq. ft. 

For dwellings in commercial districts 12,000 sq. ft. 

Under no conditions shall there be less than 6,000 square feet 
of lot area for each family to be housed on said lot. 



22 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

(b) Except as hereinafter specified, there shall be provided for 
each dwelling in any district and for each main non-residen- 
tial structure in a residential district a lot having at least 
80 feet of frontage on a street, at least 80 feet from side lot 
line to side lot line between said street and such structure 
and the shortest distance taken through such structure, 
from side lot line to side lot line, shall be at least 120 feet. 

(c) The provisions of paragraphs "a" and "b" shall not prevent 
the use of lots, legally established at the time these provis- 
ions were first adopted, which are non-conforming as to 
width or area, but no such lot shall be changed as to size or 
shape so as to decrease its area or width. 

(d) No more than 25 percent of the area of any lot may be 
covered by structures. 

(e) No structure or part thereof in any district shall be so lo- 
cated as to extend within 40 feet of a street line, except that 
this shall not apply to uncovered steps. 

(f ) No structure or part thereof in a residential district, and no 
dwelling or part thereof in a commercial district, shall ex- 
tend within 20 feet of a side or rear lot line. This restriction 
shall not apply to accessory buildings in residence districts, 
provided that the distance from any part of such structures 
to the lot line shall exceed its height above the ground level. 

(g) No accessory or main building shall at any points be less 
than 10 feet apart unless they conform to building code regu- 
lations relative to fire safety. 

Section (10) Non-Conforming Uses 

(a) Nothing in this by-law shall prevent the continuation of a 
non-conforming use of lot or structure. 

(b) No increase in the extent of the non-conforming use of a 
structure or lot may be made. 

(c) Wherever a non-conforming use has been changed to a more 
restricted use, it shall not again be changed to a less re- 
stricted use. 

(d) Wherever a non-conforming use has been abandoned for a 
period of more than one year it shall not be re-established 
and any future use shall conform to this by-law. 

(e) Wherever a structure, or part thereof, put to a non-con- 
forming use is destroyed or damaged, it may be recon- 
structed substantially as it existed prior to such destruction 
or damage and may continue to be used for the same or a 
more restricted use; provided that reconstruction is in fact 
commenced within a year following the date of such destruc- 
tion or damage. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 23 

Section (11) Board of Appeals 

(a) A Board of Appeals is hereby established in accordance with 
Section 30 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended. 
Said Board shall consist of five members each appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen for a term of five years provided that 
only one term shall expire each year; there shall be two 
Associate Members, each appointed by the Board of Select- 
men for a period of four years, one term to expire every sec- 
ond year, to serve on said Board of Appeals in case of a 
vacancy, inability to act, or interest on the part of a mem- 
ber. 

(b) The Board of Appeals shall adopt such rules of procedure 
and exercise such powers and duties as are consistent with 
paragraphs 3 through 9 of Section 30 of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws, as amended. Said rules of procedure shall 
include provision for submission of petition in writing, for 
advertising and holding hearings, for keeping records of 
proceedings, for recording the vote of each member upon 
each question, for setting forth the reason or reasons for 
each decision, and for notifying the parties at interest, in- 
cluding the Building Inspector and the Planning Board, as 
to each decision. The powers and duties of the- Board of 
Appeals shall include the power to determine action in the 
cases set forth in paragraphs "c", "d", and "e" below. 

(c) The Board of Appeals shall hear and decide appeals taken 
by any person aggrieved by reason of his inability to obtain 
a permit from the Building Inspector acting as enforcement 
officer under this by-law. 

(d) The Board of Appeals shall hear and decide requests for 
special permits as provided in sections 5h, 5i, and 7j of this 
by-law. 

(e) The Board of Appeals shall hear and decide requests for 
variance from the terms of this by-law where, owing to con- 
ditions especially affecting the lot or use in question, a literal 
enforcement of the provisions of the by-law would involve 
substantial hardship to the appellant, and where the desired 
relief may be granted without detriment to the public good 
and without substantially derogating from the intent or 
purpose of this by-law. 

(f) In carrying out the provisions of paragraphs (d) and (e) 
above, the Board may impose, as a condition of its decision, 
such restrictions as to manner and duration of use as will in 
its opinion safeguard the legitimate use of the property in 
the neighborhood and the health and safety of the public, and 
conform to the intent and purpose of this by-law, such re- 
strictions to be stated in writing by the Board and made a 
part of the permit. 



24 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

(g) No petition considered under paragraphs (d) or (e) above 
which has been unfavorably acted upon by the Board of 
Appeals shall be again considered on its merits by said 
Board within two years after the date of such unfavorable 
action, except with the written consent of all members of the 
Planning Board. 

Section (12) Amendments 

The Planning Board may, or upon written petition of ten citi- 
zens shall, initiate proceedings for the amendment of this by-law 
or map, pursuant to the provision of Section 27 of Chapter 40 of 
the General Laws as amended. 

Section (13) Conflict of Laws 

Where this by-law imposes a greater restriction upon the use, 
height, and area of structures or the use of premises than is im- 
posed by other by-laws, the provisions of this by-law shall con- 
trol. The invalidity of any section or provision of this by-law 
shall not invalidate any other section or provision hereof. 

Section (14) Penalty 

Whoever violates any provision of this by-law shall be punished 
by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars for each offense. Each 
day or portion thereof that such violation continues shall consti- 
tute a separate offense. 

Section (15) Effective Date 

This by-law shall take effect as provided by Section 32 of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended. 

Voted: To amend the main motion by striking out from the 
last clause of Section (2) paragraph (i) the words "lot may be 
defined as" and inserting in their place the words " 'lot' "shall 
mean" so that the last sentence shall read: "Whenever such a 
parcel is divided on a plan which has been recorded or filed at 
the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, the term 
"lot" as used in this by-law shall mean a single parcel on the 
plot plan accompanying application for a Building Permit." 

Voted: To amend the main motion by adding to the end of 
Section 5, paragraph (f) the following clause: "but there shall 
be no other signs or display of goods visible from the street," 
so that the last sentence of the paragraph shall read: "In such 
cases one sign of not more than two square feet in area may be 
displayed, but there shall be no other signs or display of goods 
visible from the street." 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 25 

Voted: To amend the main motion by inserting in Section 9, 
paragraph (b) after the second occurrence of the words "eighty 
feet" the phrase, "in any direction" so that the paragraph shall 
read: "Except as hereinafter specified there shall be provided 
for each dwelling in any district and for each main non-residen- 
tial structure in a residential district a lot having at least 
80 feet of frontage on a street, at least 80 feet in any direction 
from side lot line to side lot line between said street and such 
structure, and the shortest distance taken through such struc- 
ture from side lot line to side lot line shall be at least 120 feet." 

Voted: To amend the main motion by adding to the word 
"building," the fifth word in Section 9, paragraph (g) the letter 
"s" so that the paragraph shall read: "No accessory or main 
buildings shall at any points be less than 10 feet apart unless 
they conform to building code regulations relative to fire 
safety." 

Voted: To amend the main motion by adding to Section 10, 
paragraph (e) the following clause, "and the reconstruction is 
completed and the structure occupied within a reasonable time 
thereafter," so that the entire section (e) shall read: "Wherever 
a structure, or part thereof, put to a non-conforming use is 
destroyed or damaged, it may be reconstructed substantially 
as it existed prior to such destruction or damage and may 
continue to be used for the same or a more restricted use: 
provided that reconstruction is in fact commenced within a 
year following the date of such destruction or damage, and the 
reconstruction is completed and the structure occupied within 
a reasonable time thereafter." 

The Main motion as amended above was then voted on and 
unanimously adopted. 

At this point Mr. Henry Warner made a few remarks regard- 
ing the splendid work done by the Planning Board and highly 
commended them. Loud and prolonged applause. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $467.03 to pay the following un-paid 
1950 bills: 



26 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Highway Department White Motor Company $229 31 
School Department Boston Edison Company 176 77 
Town of Arlington 12 00 

General Heat and Appliance Company 48 95 

Voted: That the Treasurer be authorized to pay the follow- 
ing unpaid 1950 bills: 

Highway Department White Motor Company $229 31 
School Department Boston Edison Company 176 77 
Town of Arlington 12 00 

General Heat and Appliance Company 48 95 

Fire Department Tracey's Service Station 66 80 



$533 83 



Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a com- 
mittee to revise the Town By-laws, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a Committee of three 
to study the existing general by-laws of the Town and make 
recommendations for revisions prior to the next Annual Town 
Meeting and that the sum of $150.00 be appropriated for the 
use of the Committee, said sum to be taken from Free Cash. 
Committee appointed: Sumner Smith, F. Winchester Denio 
and Henry Warner. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chap- 
ter 820 of the Acts of 1950, which provides for an increase in 
the annual amounts of certain pensions, retirement allowances, 
annuities and other benefits payable by the Commonwealth 
and its political subdivisions to certain former employees and 
persons claiming under them, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Voted: That the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 820 
of the Acts of 1950 of the Massachusetts Legislature. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to take any action 
on House Bill No. 157 which is, "An act restricting the use of 
lands abutting the highway now known as Route 2 in the towns 
of Belmont, Arlington, Lexington, Lincoln and Concord." 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 27 

Voted: That the Town instruct the Selectmen to support 
Senate Bill No. 157 which is, "An act restricting the use of 
lands abutting the highway now known as Route 2 in the 
towns of Belmont, Arlington, Lexington, Lincoln and Concord. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum 
of $5,000.00 to be used by a committee appointed by the 
Moderator to study further the building needs of the Lincoln 
schools, said sum to be supplied from free cash, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate $5,000.00 to be used by a 
committee appointed by the Moderator to provide rough plans 
and specifications and to obtain estimates of costs for an 
Assembly Hall — Gymnasium and four class rooms to be 
added to the new school buildings, said sum to be taken from 
free cash. Committee: James DeNormandie, Pearson Hunt, 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Elizabeth Snelling and Robert M. 
Kimball. 

The Meeting adjourned at 10:15 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



28 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
Saturday, March 10th, 1951 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting, the meeting was called to order by the Modera- 
tor, the ballot box was inspected, the following ballot clerks 
duly sworn, Helena A. Dee, Bertha V. Bowles, Joseph Frazier, 
Manley B. Boyce, William O. Causer and David B. Spooner. 
The polls were declared open at 12 o'clock noon, and closed at 
8 o'clock P.M., with the following results: Total vote 886. 

MODERATOR (3 years) 

Donald P. Donaldson 824 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 61 



TOWN CLERK (1 year) 

William H. Davis 825 

Blanks 61 



SELECTMAN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

(3 years) 

Edward Donlan Rooney 122 

D. Everett Sherman, Jr 358 

Henry DeC. Ward 402 

Blanks 4 

ASSESSOR (3 years) 

Arthur W. Rice, Jr 602 

Ehlert William Seeckts 236 

Blanks 48 

TREASURER (1 year) 

Frederick B. Taylor 777 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 108 

AUDITOR (1 year) 

Pearson Hunt 757 

Blanks 129 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 29 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (3 years) 

Lucy Elliott Bygrave 742 

Scattering 8 

Blanks 136 

WATER COMMISSIONER (3 years) 

Robert W. Scott 721 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 164 

BOARD OF HEALTH (3 years) 

Nancy D.Hurd 739 

Blanks 147 

TREE WARDEN (1 year) 

John W. Gilbert 792 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 93 

COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS (3 years) 

Leonard C. Larrabee 748 

Blanks 138 

TRUSTEE OF BEMIS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

(3 years) 

Leonard C. Larrabee 748 

Blanks 138 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER (3 years) 

Robert D. Donaldson 774 

Blanks 112 

PLANNING BOARD (5 years) 

Richard J. Eaton 404 

Anthony Faunce 401 

Blanks 81 

DIRECTOR OF DeCORDOVA-DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

(4 years) 

Jane K. Vance 753 

Scattering 3 

Blanks 130 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



30 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



March 19th, 1951, 



A recount of votes cast for the office of Planning Board was 
held in the Town Hall on the above date with the follow- 
ing result: 

PLANNING BOARD (5 years) 

Richard J. Eaton 406 

Anthony Faunce 398 

Blanks 82 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 31 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 11th, 1951 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the meeting was called 
to order by the Moderator at 7:30 o'clock P.M. The return 
of the Warrant was read and the following business transacted : 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to increase the 
following Department and Committee Budgets. 

Election and Registration 
Town House 
Civil Defense 
Building Code Committee 
Highway Department 
Legal 
Schools 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: (Unanimously). That the sum of $2,525.00 be 
appropriated for the following Departments and Committees: 

Town House, repairs $1,375 00 

Election and Registration (Supplies and 

Miscellaneous) 50 00 

Building Code Committee 500 00 

Highway Department (Supplies and Mis- 
cellaneous) 200 00 

Schools Transportation 400 00 

and that said sum be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to speed-zone several roads in the Town, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the sum of $1,000.00 be appropriated for speed- 
zoning, with the assistance of the Department of Public 
Works, such road or roads as the Board of Selectmen may 
designate. Said sum to be taken from Free Cash. A motion 
duly seconded 'That Article 8 be taken up at this time" was 
lost. 



32 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate not 
exceeding $65,000 to construct a new 16-inch cement lined cast 
iron water supply main from the pumping station to the reser- 
voir, and determine whether the money shall be raised by taxa- 
tion, borrowing, transfer of available funds in the treasury, or 
otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the Article. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate not 
exceeding $230,000 for the acquisition of land and the develop- 
ment therein of a well field including wells, pipes and pumping 
stations (both buildings and original equipment) and for the 
construction of water mains of 16 inches or more in diameter, 
and determine whether the money shall be raised by taxation, 
borrowing, transfer of available funds in the treasury or other- 
wise, or take any other action relating thereto. 

A motion duly seconded, "That $70,000.00 is hereby appro- 
priated for the acquisition of about ten acres of land situated 
east of Fairhaven Bay and north of South Great Road which 
the Board of Water Commissioners is hereby authorized to 
acquire on behalf of the Town, and the development therein of 
a well field including wells, pipes and pumping stations (both 
buildings and original equipment), and to meet the said 
appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Select- 
men, is authorized to issue from time to time $70,000.00 in 
bonds or notes of the Town payable within fifteen years from 
their respective dates, and $130,000.00 is hereby appropriated 
for the purchase and construction of water mains of 16 inches 
or more in diameter, cement lined and coated, and to meet the 
said appropriations the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to issue from time to time $130,000.00 
in bonds or notes of the Town payable within twenty-five years 
from their respective dates." was lost. The following amend- 
ment to the main motion was then voted: (For 247, Against 
90). "That the main motion be amended by substituting for 
the body thereof the following : ' That the Water Commission- 
ers be authorized to make surveys of lands suitable for a well 
field and report to the next annual meeting and appropriate 
$1,000.00 therefor, said sum to be taken from the Water Works 
Treasury." 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 33 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to install a new 
1500 gallon per minute capacity pump in the pumping station, 
make the necessary changes to the power line and suction pipe, 
raise and appropriate the necessary sum of money, borrow 
same, use available funds in the Treasury, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: To postpone indefinitely. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to install a new 
8-inch transit water pipe on Page Road from the corner of 
Trapelo Road to the beginning of the new 8-inch pipe by the 
Osborne barn, a distance of about 1900 feet, raise and appropri- 
ate the necessary sum of money, borrow same, use available 
funds in the Treasury, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That $4,000.00 is hereby appropriated for the con- 
struction of an 8 -inch transit water main on Page Road from 
the corner of Trapelo Road to the beginning of the new 8-inch 
pipe by the Osborne barn, and to meet said appropriation, the 
sum of $4,000.00 be taken from Water Works surplus. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to be used to preserve and micro film 
Town Records and to purchase equipment therefor, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be instructed to make provision 
for the safe keeping, preservation, and copying or otherwise 
duplicating the early records of the Town, and that $150.00 be 
appropriated for the purposes to be taken from Free Cash. 
It being understood that the enactment of this motion author- 
izes the Selectmen if they deem it wise, to deposit the records 
for safe-keeping outside the limits of the Town. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of constructing and 
originally equipping and furnishing an addition to the elemen- 
tary school, to include six classrooms and a multi-purpose 
assembly-gymnasium, and determine how the appropriation 
will be raised, by transfer from available funds, borrowing, or 
otherwise, or take any action relative thereto. 



34 TOWN OF LINXOLN 

Voted: (For 271, Against 16). That the sum of $385,000.00 
be raised and appropriated for the purpose of constructing and 
originally equipping and furnishing an addition to the new 
elementary school to include six classrooms and a multi-pur- 
pose assembly-gymnasium, and to meet said appropriation, 
that the sum of $50,000.00 be appropriated from available 
funds in the Treasury, and that the Treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow the 
sum of $335,000.00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor; $250,000.00 of the loan hereby authorized is under 
the authority of and in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 356 of the Acts of 1951 and $85,000.00 of the said 
loan is under the authority of and in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 44 of General Laws ; and that the Committee 
appointed by the Moderator in accordance with the vote of 
the Town under Article 16 at the annual meeting on March 5, 
1951 is hereby continued and is hereby authorized and em- 
powered to enter into contracts and to do all things necessary 
to construct and equip and furnish said addition ; and if a va- 
cancy should occur on said Committee the Moderator is hereby 
authorized to fill such vacancy. 

Meeting adjourned at 11:30 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

JURY LIST, 1951 



35 



Name 
Thomas B. Adams 
Harold T. Ashworth 
Paul Brooks 
George A. Cunningham 
Richard J. Eaton 
Harry Cook 
Laurence Cousins 
Sherman H. Davis 
James Diamond 
Edward Danosky 
Anthony Faunce 
Charles K. Fitts 
Thomas T. Giles 
Frank Gordon 
Thomas A. O. Gross 
Arthur T. Howard 
Merrill Hunt 
Karl F. Lahnstein 
Louis E. Paddock 
Robert Pellandini 
Roland W. Robbins 
Ehlert W. Seeckts 
Frederic M. Spooner 
John B. Tew 
Frederick P. Walkey 

Appointed June 25th, 1951 



Occupation 
Executive 
Radio Engineer 
Publisher 
Fireman 
Trustee 
-Farmer 

Plant Superintendent 
Farmer 
Police Work 
Farmer 
Insurance 
Buyer 

Garage Superintendent 
Milkman 

Electriral Engineer 
Printer 
Executive 
Museum Work 
Industrial Engineer 
Pay Roll Clerk 
Painting Contractor 
Assistant Manager 
General Man 
Investment Analyst 
Museum Director 



WILLIAM 



H. DAVIS, 

Town Clerk. 



LICENSES 

Total number of Dog Licenses issued during the year 1951, 
397; namely, 227 Male, 60 Female, 107 Spayed Female and 
3 Kennel for which the sum of $933.60 has been paid to the 
Treasurer. 

Sporting, etc., issued during the year 1951 — 69 Fishing, 
58 Hunting, 56 Sporting, 22 Minor Fishing, 1 Non-resident 
Fishing and 1 Non-resident Hunting, for which the sum of 
$423.50 has been paid to the Division of Fisheries and Game. 



WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



36 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



VITAL STATISTICS 

57 Births, 27 Marriages and 26 Deaths were recorded during 
the year 1951. 

Births 



Date of Birth 


Name of Child 


Names of Parents 


Dec. 8, 


1950 


Robert Livingstone Niles, Jr. 


Robert L. and Virginia Niles 


Dec. 16, 


1950 


William Norton 


Paul L. and Margaret H. Norton 


Dec. 25, 


1950 


Bruce Curtis Beal 


Harold B. and Shirley A. Beal 


Dec. 27, 


1950 


George Bunsen Henderson, 2nd 


Gerard C. and Edith M. Henderson, Jr. 


Jan. 3, 


1951 


Steven Douglas Torode 


Herbert L. and Lorraine S. Torode 


Jan. 4, 


1951 


Janice Diane Ziman 


Albert F. and Dorothy E. Ziman 


Jan. 5, 


1951 


Lydia Staniford Adams 


John Q. and Lucy F. D. Adams 


Jan. 8, 


1951 


John Allenwood Fletcher 


Walter B. and Helen F. Fletcher 


Jan. 15, 


1951 


Caroline Eddy Emmons 


A. Bradlee and Judith R. Emmons 


Jan. 25, 


1951 


Pamela Christie Lawson 


Raymond P. and June M. Lawson 


Jan. 26, 


1951 


Robert Dean Smiley 


Kenneth H. and Ann B. T. Smiley, Jr. 


Jan. 27, 


1951 


Leslie Marie Hallinan 


Arthur J. and Lorraine T. S. Hallinan 


Feb. 1, 


1951 


Constance Ayer 


Richard B. and Emily C. M. Ayer, Jr. 


Feb. 3, 


1951 


Douglas Lawrence Roy 


Eugene U. and Nancy J. C. Roy 


Feb. 4, 


1951 


Margaret Lyman Parson, 2nd 


Stephen P. and Esther M. Parson 


Feb. 6, 


1951 


Peter Fayssoux Billings 


Bruce H. and Sally W. Billings 


Feb. 8, 


1951 


Brian Patrick Cassidy 


Harry J. and Verna E. C. Cassidy 


Feb. 10, 


1951 


Susan Lee Algeo 


John T. and Catherine R. B. Algeo 


Feb. 19, 


1951 


Elizabeth Ann Cook 


Harry and Kathleen G. M. Cook 


Feb. 20, 


1951 


Gerald Mosher Browning 


George U. and Marjorie E. M. Browning 


Mar. 2, 


1951 


Helen Judson Clark 


William Van Alan and Mary F. H. Clark 


Mar. 7, 


1951 


John Martin Coffey 


John B. and Wilma L. H. Coffey 


Mar. 21, 


1951 


Steven Frederick Mickle 


Frederick W. and Mary E. D. Mickle 


April 12, 


1951 


Alden Hallock Woodhull 


Dean H. and Martha D. G. Woodhull 


Apil 21, 


1951 


Deborah Dunham Lothrop 


John W. and Ellen D. P. Lothrop 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
Births — Continued 



37 



Date of Birth 


Name of Child 


Names of Parents 


April 21 


1951 


June Ellen Clarke 


Richard J. and Edna S. Clarke 


April 22, 


1951 


Robert James Westcott 


Vernon C. and Mary-Alice C. Westcott 


May 19, 


1951 


Anthony Packard Church 


Robert and Priscilla S. Church 


May 25, 


1951 


Jan Healy Warner 


John B. and Barbara L. K. Warner 


May 26, 


1951 


Thomas Joseph Rando 


Felice S. and Joseph". ne H. M. Rando 


June 11, 


1951 


Geoffrey Lincoln Davis 


Henry R. and Jean K. Davis, Jr. 


June 14, 


1951 


Mary Alice Tripp 


R. Maurice and Catherine G. B. Tripp 


June 15, 


1951 


Corby Woolston Moore 


Herbert L. and Sylvia H. W. Moore 


June 16, 


1951 


Robert Loomis Grabill 


Elliott V. and Martha L. Grabill 


July 16, 


1951 


Lisa Soderberg 


C. Richard and Nancy T. Soderberg, Jr. 


July 21, 


1951 


Nathan Lord Wilbur 


Richard P. and Charlotte H. W. Wilbur 


Aug. 7, 


1951 


Joanne Malloy 


Robert J. and Terese A. D. Malloy 


Aug. 14, 


1951 


D. Bradford Davis, Jr. 


D. Bradford and Barbara E. G. Davis 


Aug. 15, 


1951 


Jean Louise Murphy 


William F. and Ruth M. Murphy 


Aug. 31. 


1951 


Sandra Anne Justice 


Norman E. and He' .n J. J. Justice 


Sept. 13, 


1951 


George Arthur Snow 


Clayton R. and Carolyn L. S. Snow 


Sept. 25, 


1951 


Jean MacGregor England 


Albert C. and Priscilla S. England 


Sept. 27. 


1951 


Alice Beverly Spooner 


Frederic M. and Arietta L. Spooner 


Oct. 10, 


1951 


Sara Graham Mann 


Robert C. and Evelyn L. D. Mann 


Oct. 23, 


1951 


Nawton Prouty DeNormandie 


James and Martha B. P. DeNormandie 


Oct. 25, 


1951 


Kate Brooks 


Paul and Susan M. Brooks 


Oct. 26, 


1951 


Robert Crosby Bygrave 


Robert and Lucy E D. Bygiave 


Oct. 29. 


1951 


William Wineow Lord, Jr. 


William W. and Mary L. P. Lord 


Nov. 8, 


1951 


Donald Robert Murphy 


Edward W. and Marjorie A. M. Murphy 


Nov. 17, 


1951 


Shirley Ann York 


Norman E. and Muriel York 


Nov. 24, 


1951 


Amanda Morgan 


Henry M. and Gwen Morgan 


Dec. 1, 


1951 


Susan Diane Street 


Earle B. and Janet H. Street 


Dec. 5. 


1951 


Sarah Margaret Kingsbury 


Roy S. and Ann Elizabeth B. Kingsbury 


Dec. 17, 


1951 


Charles Herbert Booth 


Lloyd and Elizabeth F. Booth. Jr. 


Dec 17, 


1951 


Virginia Todd 


David and Geraldine F. Todd 


Dec. 31, 


1951 


Elizabeth Jean Grinnell 


William L. and Virginia E. Grinnell 


Dec. 31, 


1951 


Roland Chester Mackenzie, Jr. 


Roland C. and Ethel L. Mackenzie 



38 




TOWN OF LINCOLN 








Marriages 




Date of Marriage 


Names 


Residence 


Jan. 


4, 1951 


John Farrar Giles 
Mary Cecelia Magurn 


Lincoln 
Concord 


Jan. 


13, 1951 


Adrian Nionial Hewett 
Virginia Roberta Pellandini 


Anchorage, Alaska 
Lincoln 


Jan. 


27, 1951 


Frank Joseph Daniels, Jr. 
Claire Maria Manning 


Watertown 
Lincoln 


Jan. 


27, 1951 


William L. Harrington, Jr. 
Ethel Mildred Andersen 


Lincoln 
Concord 


Jan. 


28, 1951 


Stephen Alfred Scarpitti 
Virginia Lincoln Sorenson 


West Concord 
Lincoln 


Feb. 


3, 1951 


William Graham Savage 
Virginia Valentine 


Lincoln 
Concord 


Feb. 


14, 1951 


Frank Wallace Peterson 
Mary Elizabeth Giles 


Concord 
Lincoln 


Feb. 


24, 1951 


David Howard Russell Lester 
Alice Louise Hoffman 


Schenectady, N. Y. 
Lincoln 


Apr. 


12, 1951 


James F. Burke, Jr. 
Catherine Cecile Murphy 


Litchfield, Conn. 
Lincoln 


Apr. 


19, 1951 


Gordon Ellis Barnes 
Alice Marie Silva 


Pennsylvania 
Lincoln 


Apr. 


21, 1951 


Roman Slominski 
Janina S. Rudzki 


Lincoln 
Lincoln 


May 


16, 1951 


John L. Rockwell 
Charlotte A. Browning 


Framingham 
Lincoln 


May 


19, 1951 


Peter Anthony Bator 
Mary Crawford Bigelow 


New York, N. Y. 
Lincoln 


June 


3, 1951 


Albert William Hanlon, Jr. 
Virginia Lorette Manter 


Lincoln 
Concord 


June 


23, 1951 


William Heywood Penn 
Ann Farrar Giles 


Moosup, Conn. 
Lincoln 


June 


23, 1951 


John Robbins Rand 
Sally Ann Wallace 


Lincoln 
Lunenburg 


June 


30, 1951 


Donald E. Guay 
Lena M. Young 


Lincoln 
Lincoln 


July 


21, 1951 


Sewell Douglas Winslow 
Virginia Richings Cullen 


Wollaston 
Lincoln 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
Marriages — Continued 



39 



Date of Marriage 


Names 


Residence 


Aug. 


19, 1951 


Helmut A. Zander 


Lincoln 






Annemarija F. Fogels 


Lincoln 


Aug. 


15, 1951 


John T. Kennedy 


Lincoln 






Virginia Troupe 


Acton 


Aug. 


24, 1951 


Miles Lee Cain 


San Angelo 






Gloria Jean Sorensen 


Lincoln 


Sept. 


1, 1951 


Leon Aznive, Jr. 


Stoneham 






Charlotte Wheeler Gale 


Lincoln 


Aug. 


31, 1951 


James M. Neville 


Lincoln 






Jeanne Belle 


Concord 


Sept. 


15, 1951 


James Lawrence Gormley 


Lincoln 






Norma Esther Sorli 


West Newton 


Sept. 


22, 1951 


Albert Paine Everts, Jr. 


Newton 






Lucy R. Abbot 


Lincoln 


Nov. 


11, 1951 


Charles Albert Myott 


Somerville 






Helen Marie Coan 


Lincoln 


Nov. 


17, 1951 


Carl A. Carlson 


Winchester 






Constance Helen Moszka 


Lincoln 



40 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
Deaths 



Date of Death 



Name 



Y. 



Age 
M. 



Jan. 


2, 1951 


Feb. 


4, 1951 


Feb. 


20, 1951 


Feb. 


28, 1951 


Feb. 


26, 1951 


May 


1, 1951 


May 


5, 1951 


May 


20, 1951 


May 


15, 1951 


June 


26, 1951 


June 


4, 1951 


June 


11, 1951 


July 


14, 1951 


July 


30, 1951 


Sept. 


7, 1951 


Aug. 


30, 1951 


Sept. 


13, 1951 


Sept. 


29, 1951 


Oct. 


19, 1951 


Nov. 


17, 1951 


Nov. 


20, 1951 


Nov. 


16, 1951 


Nov. 


11, 1951 


Nov. 


20, 1951 


Dec. 


7, 1951 


Dec. 


25, 1951 



John P. Boyce 
Lula Geralda Adams 
Margaret M. Corrigan 
Fritz Cunnert 
Madeline Alice Rice 
Sanford Saylor Winchell 
Louisa Robbins 
Bertha Farnsworth 
Anthony J. Doherty 
Fridolin Hagmann 
Fred Elmer Cousins 
Michael Ciraso 
Waldo Emerson Palmer 
Margaret Elizabeth Allen 
Mary E. B. Hupper 
Thomas F. Coan 
Willa Anne Duncanson 
Charles Ora Preble 
George Marshall Crawford 
William Bolio 
John Hugh Rogers 
Margaret Lahnstein 
Mary A. Murphy 
Mary Murnaghan 
Tryphena M. Coane 
Thomas John Dee 



70 



74 


1 


11 


65 


10 


19 


81 


— 


— 


4 





28 


90 





16 


86 


2 


8 


78 


8 


27 


70 ■ 








87 





29 


63 


4 


6 


52 


2 


14 


88 


1 


13 


92 


11 


26 


63 


8 


16 


90 


6 


25 


72 





3 


45 





5 


70 


3 


27 


76 





14 


40 


11 


4 


68 








75 


11 


11 


78 


— 


— 


75 


5 


28 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN 41 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The Police, Highway and Fire Departments deserve special 
comment because of changes which have taken place or which 
are recommended for action at the 1952 Annual Town Meeting. 

Police 

Chief Algeo and Officer Hallett have done commendable 
work throughout the year. The Report of the Police Depart- 
ment appended hereto gives the record of arrests but does not 
cover such activities as checking vacant houses, responses to 
calls where no arrest follows, protection of the school children, 
and hours of patrolling. 

With the population of the Town increasing rapidly there are 
more people and more property to protect. Normal driving 
speed of automobiles is clearly increasing and more cars are on 
the highways. The city is moving out this way, bringing some 
disruptive elements. It is the opinion of the Selectmen that 
the police force should now be increased to keep it abreast of 
local conditions. The recommendation is for one additional 
officer and an additional cruising car which would give the 
Town much greater coverage during certain hours each day. 
In this connection it should be pointed out that during the past 
few years there has been a steadily increasing use of special 
police and that without an additional regular officer this trend 
would continue. 

The cost of the additional officer and car for 1952 would be 
about $5,000 which includes salary for nine months, a new car 
and all original equipment for both. Thereafter, the cost is 
estimated at $4,650 less perhaps $400 to $500 saving in pay for 
special police. The Police budget as reported by the Finance 
Committee is based on this recommendation. 

Highway 

The death on August 30, 1951 of Thomas F. Coan who had 
been Superintendent of Streets for the past eight years and had 
worked for the Town for many years before that, was a heavy 



42 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

loss to the Town as a whole. Mr. Coan was one of those loyal 
citizens, of whom we have had many, who gladly give of their 
time and energy for the common good. Clifford Bradley, who 
had worked with Mr. Coan, was appointed Acting Superinten- 
dent in the spring of 1951 and has continued in that capacity. 
He may be reached at LI6-0263J or at the Town Garage, 
LI6-0398W. 

Chapter 90 construction work for 1952 will include the com- 
pletion of Bedford Road between Routes 2 and 2A. Following 
conversations with the Planning Board, the Selectmen have 
recommended to the County Commissioners that one of the 
roads leading from Route 2A to the airport should be rebuilt in 
order to take care of the impending increased traffic. 

Fire 

The Selectmen are in agreement with the Fire Engineers on 
their recommendation that the Town acquire land for a fire 
station in the vicinity of the intersection of Route 2 and Bedford 
Road. Although the present building in that area rented from 
Joseph R. Tracy is adequate for the next few years, a larger 
building on a larger lot owned by the Town is desirable and 
probably necessary at some time in the not too distant future. 
It is anticipated that an article will appear in the warrant, for 
the March 1952 or some subsequent meeting, to acquire land 
for this purpose. 

Speed Zoning 

Acting on authority of the vote at the June 1952 Town Meet- 
ing, the Selectmen engaged Sgt. John Foster of Concord to 
survey the traffic conditions of the Town and make recommen- 
dations for speed zones. His work has been completed and 
approved with modifications by the Selectmen. The Depart- 
ment of Public Utilities and the Registry of Motor Vehicles 
have not acted as yet. 

The Town vs. Boston Edison Company 

Late in 1951 the Department of Public Utilities directed the 
Boston Edison Company to construct its high tension line con- 
necting Framingham and Waltham by the use of overhead lines 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN 43 

on the Boston & Maine Railroad right-of-way on the Central 
Massachusetts Branch. This route avoids Lincoln entirely, 
passing from Waltham through Weston into Wayland. In 
spite of this fact, Lincoln is continuing to support the bill again 
introduced in the new legislature to force the Company to con- 
struct an underground line. A great deal of money has been 
spent on this case since 1948, Lincoln's share being in excess of 
$1,800.00, including the amount requested under the special 
deficiency article this year. Complete success cannot be 
claimed until the precedent of underground lines is established. 

Pending State Legislation 

In addition to the proposed legislation on underground lines, 
the Town is interested in House Bills Nos. 1525 and 1803 which 
renew the question of zoning Route 2 for residential purposes 
from the foot of Belmont Hill to the Concord Reformatory. 
The bills are similar to those introduced last year which were 
defeated. The Selectmen and Planning Board were recorded 
in favor of the new bills at the Committee hearing in Janu- 
ary, 1952. 

Comment has been made before on the Town's loss in the 
death of Thomas F. Coan. The year 1951 took from us four 
other citizens who lived here all their lives and contributed 
generously to the Town's welfare: 

Anthony J. Doherty, who in the course of his active partici- 
pation in Town affairs, served as Selectman, member of the 
School Committee, and as one of the original members of the 
Board of Appeals. 

John H. Rogers, who for many years, served as Town 
Counsel. 

Thomas J. Dee, Assessor and active member of the Fire De- 
partment for many years, who was better known to the younger 
generation as driver of the school bus. 

Fritz Cunnert, Cemetery Commissioner and an original mem- 
ber of the Board of Appeals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN O. WILSON, Chairman, 
EDMUND W. GILES, 
HENRY DeC. WARD. 



44 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 



Although there have been many changes during the year 
1951, the case load in Old Age Assistance is the same as at the 
close of 1950. During the year budgets were increased in 
October, as required by law, due to an over-all increase in the 
cost of living. In December new legislation was passed relat- 
ing to Old Age Assistance and additional budget increases will 
be made in January of 1952. 

During the year six cases were added and six were closed, 
three because of death, one transfer to another town and two 
because of increased income. At the close of the year there 
were forty-two cases settled as follows: Lincoln twenty-nine, 
other cities and towns seven, no settlement six. 

Gross cost of Old Age Assistance $39,130 94 

Federal Government $15,975 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 19,262 06 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Meals Tax. . . 629 14 

Other Cities and Towns 640 46 

Cost to Town of Lincoln 5,468 34 

$41,975 00 
Balance in Federal Grants account, reserved for 
O.A.A 2,844 06 



$39,130 94 



The amount of $28,000, requested for 1952 allows for a nor- 
mal increase in cases, estimated budget increases required by 
law and increased cost to the Town due to elimination of re- 
imbursement for L.T.A. by the Commonwealth. The State's 
share, estimated somewhat in excess of $20,000, will be re- 
funded leaving the net cost to the Town approximately $8,000. 
Although the Town must appropriate the total sum of $28,000, 
an allowance is made for the amount to be refunded by the 
State in determining the tax rate. 



REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 45 

It is estimated that approximately $16,000 will be received 
from the Federal Government, making the estimated expendi- 
tures for the year nearly $44,000. The Federal Government 
contribution does not have to be appropriated by the Town 
but may be used as received. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER, 
MARIAN N. OBER, 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 



46 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS 

OF THE 

deCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



Review of 1951 



For all of us connected with the Museum, 1951 was a success- 
ful and busy year. We claim many major exhibition triumphs 
but realize there is still much to be accomplished. The new 
activities which were undertaken such as concerts, motion pic- 
tures, and lectures were satisfying but not wholly successful in 
attracting public interest. 

The Museum presented two chamber music series and will 
continue to do so as no similar opportunity exists locally. The 
Museum auditorium has proved to be outstanding both for the 
performers and the audience. This type of program while not 
a familiar one is very logical for it provides the finest music 
which the seating capacity of the hall will afford, and we are 
certain that the excellence of the performing musicians will 
soon bring support from a greater number of patrons. 

The two lectures were by artists of great distinction, but their 
local reputations were not sufficient to interest our gallery 
goers. Because we must continue to pursue an educational 
program to assist the public in its understanding of modern art, 
we shall continue to present from time to time other distin- 
guished speakers in this field. 

The Lincoln Film Society presented a number of classic 
motion pictures in the Museum Auditorium. This type of 
program has been we]] received in surrounding communities, 
and appeared to be a natural for the Lincoln audience. Atten- 
dance, however, has been sporadic, but that does not deter the 
Society from presenting still another series during the first 
quarter of 1952. All the Film Society movies were presented 
free to the children at matinee performances. 

The first major exhibition held at the Museum was "Moods 
and Movements — Boston 1951." It included twenty of 
Boston's most prominent painters, each represented by three 
canvasses. The public response to this exhibition was gratify- 
ing, and was recognition of the fact that this was the most 



REPORT OF DIRECTORS OF MUSEUM AND PARK 47 

important show of its kind ever held in Greater Boston. Dur- 
ing this exhibition, the Lincoln Garden Club held its annual 
Spring Flower Show at the Museum, attracting visitors from 
many parts of the State. 

In the fall of 1951, a second major exhibition was presented. 
The Executive Director conceived the novel idea of presenting 
sculpture in a natural setting. Wherever possible, three 
pieces from America's outstanding living sculptors were chosen 
and exhibited in conjunction with modern furniture loaned to 
the exhibition by Paine's Furniture Company of Boston and 
The Architect's Collaborative of Cambridge. Approximately 
450 people attended the opening. The reputation of "Three- 
Dimensional for Modern Living" spread, attracting an esti- 
mated 3000 visitors to the Museum during its five week 
duration. 

The program of exhibitions continued on its previously es- 
tablished course of emphasizing regional art. Sixteen new or 
relatively unknown artists were introduced in one-man or two- 
man shows. In all, twenty exhibitions were held in 1951, 
covering graphic arts, water colors, oil paintings, ceramic, 
drawings and sculpture. The Museum, in one year, has moved 
to the forefront as a major cultural force in greater Boston. 
Planned exhibitions for the future include such previously ne- 
glected fields as photography, American glass, handicrafts, and 
more comprehensive displays of decorative arts. 

The educational program of the Museum developed to such 
proportions that Mr. Joseph Hodgson was appointed Director 
of Education on a three day a week basis. The fees for all 
classes have been kept as low as possible, consistent with the 
standards of instruction demanded by the Museum Directors. 
This has resulted in a loss for the year of approximately $1,000 
which has been made up from the limited funds of the trust in- 
come. The attendance for the final quarter of 1951 to the 
classes reached its highest peak: 245 children and 170 adults. 

To serve the artist, the Museum sells from exhibitions but 
takes no commissions from the sales. This policy is judicious, 
for there is no competition with the commercial galleries. It 
has gained for the Museum much good will and the complete 
cooperation of both the artist and the dealer. During 1951, 
fourteen paintings, seven prints and five pieces of sculpture 
were sold. 



48 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

The Directors proceeded with the invitation to friends of the 
Museum to become "Associates" as announced in last year's 
report. We have been pleased to welcome 82 Associates, 
10 Sustaining Associates, and 17 Professional Associates as 
supporters of the Museum program. Their generous contri- 
butions have enabled us to present a much more varied program 
than would have been possible otherwise. Every week we gain 
new associates, especially from the people enrolled in the 
adult classes. 

The Newsletter which is published once a month is the pri- 
mary method for publicizing the Museum. The circulation to 
about 2000 interested visitors who have requested these notices 
would have been impossible without the volunteer assistance 
of the many ladies of Lincoln who have answered our call. To 
them and to the ladies who served so graciously as pourers and 
hostesses at Museum openings we give our thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

The Directors, 
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, President, 
JANE K. VANCE, Vice President, 
PEARSON HUNT, Treasurer, 
ELIZABETH J. SNELLING, Clerk, 
CHARLES H. BLAKE, 
RICHARD MERIAM, 
ARTHUR THIESSEN. 



REPORT OF DIRECTORS OF MUSEUM AND PARK 49 

deCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Treasurer's Report 
Comments on the Table 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park receives funds 
under various limitations, which are described below. Conse- 
quently, receipts and expenditures have been classified to show 
that all authorizations have been observed. Only the A and 
B trusts can be expected to supply income on an annually re- 
curring basis. 

Column 1. A. Trust Purposes: For the upkeep, mainte- 
nance and improvement of the museum and park. 

Column 2. B. Trust Purposes: 

(1 ) For the upkeep, maintenance and improvement of the 
museum and park. 

(2) For additions to the art and other collections in the 
museum. 

(3) For educational and recreational purposes. 

(4) None may be used for demolition of gallery and resi- 
dence nor for buildings to replace either. 

Column 3. For Alterations: In 1949 and 1950, with the con- 
sent of the deCordova Trustees and the approval of the Court, 
the sum of $80,413.41 from the principal of the B Trust was 
paid over for alterations, repairs, and improvements to the 
gallery and residence. 

In addition, the deCordova trustees have turned over 
$15,148.93, from current income over which they had discre- 
tion, and loaned $46,000.00 to the Corporation to assist in the 
completion of alterations. A further grant of $3,964.42 re- 
ceived in 1951, completed this assistance of the trustees for 
alterations. 

The total cost of alterations, including payments in 1951, is 
$207,390.70. 

Column 4. Sale of Property. This sum represents the pro- 
ceeds of sales of art objects, books, and miscellaneous items. 
Although part of this sum has been used for alterations to the 
buildings, it is the intention of the directors to restore the total 
in later years, to be used for additions to the permanent collec- 
tions of the museum. 



50 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



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REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 51 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

1952 



The Finance Committee recommends that the Town appro- 
priate for general purposes $345,100 for the several specific 
amounts enumerated in the schedule attached. 

This $345,100 recommendation compares with similar appro- 
priations of $296,773 at the two Town meetings held in 1951 
and with expenditures of $286,978 under those appropriations. 
The increase over last year's appropriations is $58,377 or 
19.6%, and the increase over last year's expenditures is 
$68,122 or 23.7%. 

The recommended appropriation for the Water Department 
is $33,779 which compares with the 1951 appropriation of 
$32,425 and with expenditures in 1951 of $30,653. 

Comparing actual expenditures for general purposes in 1951 
with the recommendations for 1952, the following is a summary 
of all increases of more than $500 in budgeted items : 

( Bonds and 1951 1952 Increase % Increase 

Schools ] Interest . . $19,550 $43,150 $23,600 120.7 

(Operations 127,490 145,732 18,242 14.3 

Police 8,811 14,119 5,308 60.24 

Aid to Citizens 27,571 31,100 3,529 12.8 

Insurance 4,197 6,816 2,619 62.4 

Highways 33,818 36,320 2,502 7.4 

Library 4,339 5,200 861 19.8 



Total of Above Items $225,776 $282,437 $56,661 25.096 

On a similar basis the major decreases were as follows : 

Civil Defense $1,900 

Town House Repairs 1 ,469 

Health and Sanitation 700 

Fire Department 483 

Board of Health 708 

Cemetery 235 



$5,495 



52 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

The remainder of the decreases were in smaller amounts. 

Each $5,000 of additional appropriation will represent 
approximately $1 in the tax rate. 

As of course was contemplated, the largest increase is for 
bonds and interest for the addition to the school, which re- 
quires $23,600 more than last year. Over the life of the bonds 
the State will reimburse the Town for approximately twenty to 
twenty-five percent of the cost of the buildings. If the require- 
ment for school bonds and interest due in 1952 are added to the 
increased operating expenses, the appropriations in this field 
will amount to approximately fifty-five percent of the Town's 
budget. The full impact of the step-rate salary program for 
teachers has not yet been reached and the appropriations in this 
year's budget of course do not reflect a full year of operation of 
the school addition. We recommend the appropriation of 
$25,000 from free cash to meet part of the School Bond pay- 
ments due in 1952. 

The Supreme Court of Massachusetts saved us from the 
much larger appropriations for Old Age Assistance which would 
have been compulsory if the law had not been declared invalid 
and for which no appropriation had been made. 

The transfers made from the Reserve Fund during the year 
were as follows: 

Town House $279 37 

Finance Committee 11 25 

Police Department 420 29 

Tree and Moth 101 51 

Inspectors 39 46 

Civil Defense 400 00 

Highway Machinery 2,745 00 

Veterans Aid Ill 48 

Insurance 497 67 

Total $4,606 03 

Balance returned to overlay surplus ac- 
count 393 97 

Total appropriation $5,000 00 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 53 

The Town Officers, Departments and Committees have, we 
believe, been judicious in the use of their appropriations. 

The Town has been in a very generous mood at its more re- 
cent meetings. The tax rate is getting close to $50 per thous- 
and of our valuation, which is double the rate ten years ago. 
Many of the expenses seem to be required and show little hope 
of reduction. Until we are willing to forego some of the things 
that are desirable but not really essential, the rapid rate of 
increase in our tax rate and burden will not be stopped. 

The increased tax receipts that would normally be expected 
from new construction will be practically offset by the reduced 
receipts resulting from the new $5,000 exemption from taxation 
of personal effects. 

We have recommended the use of a total of $34,500 of Free 
Cash out of the approximately $90,000 which is expected to be 
certified by the Commissioner of Corporations and Taxation as 
available on January 1, 1952. 

We are of the opinion that the Town business is being carried 
on competently, that the control of expenditures after appro- 
priations are made are being well handled, and that the recom- 
mended appropriations made entirely adequate provision for 
carrying on the public business of the Town for the year 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO, Chairman, 
LELAND A. WILDES, Secretary, 
WILLIAM N. PAGE, 
THOMAS J. ROUNER, 
PAUL L. NORTON, 

Finance Committee. 



54 



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60 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

ASSESSORS' REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report for the 
year 1951. 

Computation of Tax Rate 
Total Town appropriation to be raised by 

taxation $306,312 32 

Total appropriations to be taken from avail- 
able funds in 1951 27,754 68 

State Parks and Reservations 557 46 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 628 09 

County Tax 10,907 41 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 1,976 63 

Overlay of current year 5,069 59 

Gross amount to be raised $353,206 18 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

Income Tax $19,255 77 

Corporation Taxes 11,195 60 

Reimbursement on account of State owned 

land 539 35 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 18,000 00 

General Government 500 00 

Protection of Persons and Property 350 00 

Health and Sanitation 350 00 

Charities 1,000 00 

Old Age Assistance 12,000 00 

Old Age Tax (Meals) 550 83 

Cemeteries 350 00 • 

Water 28,425 00 

Interest 1,000 00 

State Assistance for School Construction .... 3,500 00 

City of Cambridge Tax 700 00 

Miscellaneous 917 35 

Amount voted to be taken from Free Cash. 27,754 68 

Overestimates of previous year 2,710 81 

Total Estimated Receipts and Available 
Funds $129,099 39 

Net Amount to be raised by Taxation 

Poll Tax $ 1,488 00 

Personal Property Tax 22,318 91 

Real Estate Tax 200,299 88 

$224,106 79 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 61 

Table of Aggregates 

Number of Persons Assessed: 

On Personal Estate only 36 

On Real Estate only 385 

On both Real and Personal Estate 320 

Total Number of Persons Assessed 741 

Number of Polls Assessed 744 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate: 

Stock in Trade $217,150 00 

Machinery 38,855 00 

Live Stock 48,643 00 

All other Tangible Personal Property 202,600 00 



Total Value of Assessed Personal Estate $507,248 00 

Value of Assessed Real Estate: 

Land $1,055,225 00 

Buildings 3,497,045 00 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate $4,552,270 00 

Total Valuation of Assessed Estate 5,059,518 00 

Tax Rate per $1,000 00 $44 00 

Number of Live Stock Assessed: 

Horses (1 year or over) 32 

Cows (1 year or over) 195 

Bulls 4 

Heifers 60 

Steers 60 

Swine (6 months old or over) 448 

Sheep 7 

Fowl 4,490 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed 8,270 91 

Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 657 

DAVID B. YOUNG, Chairman, 
GEORGE G. TARBELL, JR., 
ARTHUR W. RICE. 



62 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



VALUATION LIST, JANUARY 1, 1951 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Abbott, John A. and Diana B 

Adams, John 

Adams, John Quincy 

Adams, John Q. and Lucy D 

Adams, Ramelle C 

Adams, Thomas B 

Adkins, Archibald W. and Doro- 
thea G 

A'Hearn, Marian E 

Albano Bros 

Algeo, John T. and Catherine R. . 

Algeo, Mary A 

Anderson, Alfred F., Jr 

Anderson, Lawrence B. and 
Rosina DuP 

Antinarelli, Joseph J. and Helen 

J 

Appleby, Richard B 

Aptt, Harry S. and Etta E 

Arnold, S. Leonard and Anna M. 

Aruda, Manuel J 

Ashworth, Harold T. and Irma D. 

Avery, Abigail D 

Ayer, Richard B., Jr. and Con- 
stance M 

Aylward, Claire M 

Baggs, Arthur E., Jr. and Marion 
S 

Baker, Frederick L 

Baker, John C. and Elizabeth E. . 

Baker, Lulu G 

Baker, Margaret C 

Banks, Harland F 

Baker, Elliot R 

Barnaby, John M. and Charlotte 
B 

Barthel, Walter 

Bartlett, Theodore r 

Baxter, Charles O 

Bean, Anna K 

Bean, Elmer A 

Bean, Elmer A. and Henry N 



$250 
200 
800 

550 
200 

600 



100 
900 



350 
350 

500 



1,000 



100 



100 
200 
200 



$11 00 
8 80 

57 86 

24 20 
8 80 

26 40 



4 40 
39 60 



15 40 
15 40 

22 00 



44 00 



4 40 



4 40 
8 80 
8 80 



$7,050 



40,050 
10,500 



10,000 
3,150 
300 
4,000 
4,600 
5,250 

13,300 

500 
4,500 
3,250 
4,000 

250 
7,000 
7,500 

9,200 
1,000 

1,200 

2,000 
4,580 
5,000 
1,200 
1,500 

4,600 
5,050 
1,650 

6,000 

3,075 



$310 20 



1,762 20 
462 00 



440 00 
138 60 
13 20 
176 00 
202 40 
231 00 

585 20 

22 00 
198 00 
143 00 
176 00 

11 00 
308 00 
330 00 

404 80 
44 00 

52 80 

88 00 

201 52 
220 00 

52 80 
66 00 

202 40 
222 20 

72 60 

264 00 
135 30 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



63 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Beebe, Alice W 

Beggs, Sidney A 

Belanger, Walter E. and Mary F. 

Bergen, Kenneth 

Bernson, Bob 

Bernson, Bob and Edith J 

Bernson, Edith A 

Berry, Albert R. and M. Beatrice 
Bertolami, Leo F. and Rose M. 

Bertolami, Paolina 

Bigelow, Dr. Barry 

Billings, Bruce H. and Virginia 

M 

Billings, James B. and Marion . . . 

Bingham, Elizabeth A 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B 

Bingham, George C 

Bishop, Fern W. and Marjorie B. 

Sharpe 

Black, Everett A. and Anne E. . . 
Blake, Charles H. and Helen L. . . 
Blake, Donald D. and Alicia B. . . 

Blake, Rose 

Bliss, Charles A 

Boch, Victor and Margaret 

Bogner, Walter F. and Edith .... 

Bonia, Walter J 

Booth, Robert H 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co. . . . 

Boston & Maine R.R 

Boston Edison Co 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, Mildred W 

Bowles, William 

Boyce Brothers 

Boyce, Manley B 

Boyce, Manley B. and Alice M. . . 

Boyce, Michael J 

Bradford, Robert L. and Martha 

A 

Bradley, James and Mary E. . . . 

Bradshaw, Fred and Julia S 

Bradshaw, Sally B. Davis 



$3,700 
900 
400 
400 
400 

500 

150 

900 

350 
350 



. 600 

1,659 

600 

200 

100 

500 

150 

900 

75,000 

900 

132,500 

150 

225 

1,050 

3,750 



100 

150 

100 

10 

600 



$162 80 
39 60 
17 60 
17 60 
17 60 

22 00 

6 60 

39 60 

15 40 
15 40 



26 40 
72 99 
26 40 

8 80 
4 40 

22 00 

6 60 

39 60 

3,300 00 

39 60 

5,830 00 

6 60 

9 90 
46 20 

165 00 



4 40 

6 60 

4 40 

44 

26 40 



$47,000 

16,000 

7,400 

2,400 
5,500 
18,000 
3,250 
4,700 
400 



7,280 
10,650 

9,250 
250 
500 

10,200 

32,000 

10,500 

4,050 

5,700 

1,000 

9,200 

5,100 

14,300 



7,000 
12,150 
4,000 
12,000 
3,000 
2,500 
4,500 

5,300 

4,550 

5,000 

10,500 



$2,068 00 
704 00 

325 60 

105 60 
242 00 
792 00 
143 00 
206 80 
17 60 



320 32 

468 60 

407 00 

11 00 

22 00 

448 80 
1,408 00 
462 00 
178 20 
250 80 

44 00 
404 80 
224 40 
629 20 



308 00 
534 60 
176 00 
528 00 
132 00 
110 00 
198 00 

233 20 
200 20 
220 00 
462 00 



64 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Briggs, Susan L 

Brisson, Norman T 

Brooks, Albert S. and Maude M. . 

Brooks, Paul 

Brown, Elizabeth G 

Brown, Marion I. and Bernice I. 
Stevens 

Brown, Robert P. and Polly F. . 

Browning, Edgar C. and Kather 
ine A 

Browning, George U 

Buerger, Martin J. and Lila .... 

Burgess, Aubrey W. and Rebecca 
M 

Burgess, Catherine M 

Burke, Thomas D 

Burns, Melvin P 

Busfield, Gibson L. and Marilyn 
A 

Butcher, Charles R 

Butcher, Henry A., Jr. and Mar- 
garet V 

Butcher, Ralph E 

Buthman, Fred A. and Ednah E. 

Butler, William H. and Mary G.. 

Buttrick Company, David 

Buxton, David and Lois Pardee . . 

Byrne, Myrtle Stocher 

Calkins, Ramona T. and Whittier 

Campbell, Coburn A. L. and 
Louise J 

Campbell, Fannie S. and Adeline 
S 

Campobasso, Anthony B. and 
Dorothy M 

Campobasso, Ethel 

Canella, Calagero and Francesca, 
d/b/as Lincoln Auto Service . . 

Cannon, Ellen DeN. and Brad- 
ford 

Carman, Eleanor T 

Carney, Florence T 

Carstensen, Warren 



$700 

375 

400 
900 



150 



2,510 
600 



200 



450 



2,500 
200 



250 



1,100 

1,150 
600 

400 



$30 80 

16 50 

17 60 
39 60 



6 60 



110 44 
26 40 



8 80 



19 80 



110 00 
8 80 



11 00 



48 40 

50 60 
26 40 

17 60 



$13,500 

100 

5,400 

9,750 

14,000 

3,000 
5,900 

4,950 

6,C00 

12,000 

3,250 
1,500 
3,000 
3,050 

5,000 
1,950 

2,100 
4,300 
500 
4,750 
10,100 
6,000 
1,000 
4,500 

4,200 

9,220 

3,100 
1,500 

3,800 

22,800 
10,300 

3.575 



$594 00 

4 40 

237 60 

429 00 

616 00 

132 00 
259 60 

217 80 
264 00 
528 00 

143 00 

66 00 
132 00 
134 20 

242 00 
85 80 

92 40 
189 20 

22 00 
209 00 
444 40 
264 00 

44 00 
198 00 

184 80 

405 68 

136 40 
66 00 

167 20 

1,003 20 
453 20 
157 30 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



65 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Cassidy, Henry J. and Verna E. . 

Cassidy, Patrick J. and Edith. . . 

Catoia, Angelo and Mary J 

Catoia, Anthony J. and Lucy M. 
A 

Causer, William O 

Chapin, Robert C. and Margaret 
E 

Chapin, Louise B. and Bertha L. . 

Chapman, James S 

Chapman, Lily T 

Chase, Ann O 

Chipman, Robert Hennessy 

Chisholm, Edward C. and Mar- 
garet F 

Chu, Chauncey C. and Margaret. 

Church, Robert T. and Priscilla 
Schirmer 

Churchill, J. Stanley and Ednah 
G 

Churchill, Robert R. and June D. 

Cibel, Stanley A. and Thelma W. 

Ciraso, Michael and Amelia 

Clark, George A 

Clark, Lester M 

Clark, W. Van Alan, Jr. and 
Mary H 

Clarke, Richard J 

Coan, James P 

Coan, Thomas F 

Coane, John H 

Coane, John H., Jr 

Coburn, Edward S 

Codman, Dorothy S. F. M 

Codman, Thomas N., et al Trus- 
tees 

Cole, Edwin M. and Lucy F 

Cole, Nancy W 

Comey, Arthur C. and Elizabeth 
P 

Community Store 

Comstock, Joan B 

Conant, Lily R 



$150 



650 



150 



600 

900 
100 
200 

45 



100 
100 
100 



1,185 
100 

1,950 
650 

450 

350 

1,500 

300 

300 



$6 60 



28 60 



6 60 



26 40 

39 60 
4 40 
8 80 

1 98 



4 40 
4 40 
4 40 



52 14 
4 40 

85 80 
28 60 
19 80 

15 40 
66 00 
13 20 
13 20 



$3,650 
1,300 
3,100 

2,850 
3,300 

3,500 
11,500 

4,775 

750 

11,300 

4,000 

4,900 
1,000 

11,200 

16,500 
5,400 
6,300 
3,650 
3,650 
1,000 

5,900 

3,250 
3,350 
3,750 
2,100 
6,200 
5,000 

67,300 

11,200 

8,800 

7,500 

7,350 
9,000 



$160 60 

57 20 

136 40 

125 40 
145 20 

154 00 
506 00 
210 10 
S3 00 
497 20 
176 00 

215 60 
44 00 

492 80 

726 00 
237 60 
277 20 
160 60 
160 60 
44 00 

259 60 

143 00 
147 40 
165 00 
92 40 
272 80 
220 00 

2,961 20 
492 80 

387 20 

330 00 

323 40 
396 00 



66 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Conary, Frances P 

Concannon, Marian E 

Condit, Robert P. and Phyllis . . . 
Conlin, James J. and Winifred 

Irene 

Connors, Ann F 

Conti, Bartolomeo B 

Cook Brothers 

Cook, Harry and John F 

Corcoran, Francis J 

Corey, Robert H., Jr. and Sara P. 

Cormey, Henry J 

Cormey, Henry J. and Illione W. 

Corrigan, Edward D 

Corrigan, John F. and May. . . . 

Corrigan, Martin, Jr 

Corrigan, Mary K 

Corrigan, Patrick F 

Corrigan, Phillip K. and Muriel . . 

Costello, John D 

Costello, William B 

Cotoni, Joseph 

Cotoni, Nicholas 

Coughlan, Christina B 

Cousins, Ashley B 

Cousins, Fred E 

Cousins, Harold S 

Cousins, Laurence B. and Jeanne 

B 

Cousins, Willis N 

Cowles, Addison and Alexandra C. 
Crane, Charles E. and Hazell G. . 
Crawford, John D. and Joanna 

W 

Crawford, Marshall 

Creelman, Gilmore B. and Alice 

M 

Crider, John H. and Maxine R. . . 

Croft, Robert 

Crook, Russell G 

Crowley, Timothy J 

Crowson, Leslie W. and Madeline 

W 



$100 



600 



50 



2,475 



50 

159 
1,000 

100 
150 

50 
400 
100 



250 



$4 40 



26 40 



2 20 



108 90 



2 20 

7 00 
44 00 

4 40 
6 60 

2 20 

17 60 

4 40 



11 00 



$4,500 
5,000 
5,000 

250 
1,300 
6,750 

4,950 
3,000 
6,200 

900 
3,500 
7,000 
2,400 
1,500 
2,300 
3,400 

100 
1,800 

4,600 
5,000 
2,400 
3,400 
19,250 

4,400 

3,650 

5,150 

15,000 

5,000 
6,250 

3,550 
8,600 
4,600 
3,000 
2,000 

6,800 



$198 00 
220 00 
220 00 

11 00 

57 20 

297 00 

217 80 
132 00 

272 80 

39 60 

154 00 

308 00 

105 60 

66 00 

101 20 

149 60 

4 40 

79 20 

202 40 
220 00 
105 60 
149 60 
847 00 

193 60 
160 60 
226 60 
660 00 

220 00 

275 00 

156 20 
378 40 
202 40 
132 00 
88 00 

299 20 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



67 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Culver, Perry J. and Kate S 

Cunnert, Estate of Fritz 

Cunningham, Elizabeth A 

Cunningham, Elizabeth A. and 

Edward B 

Cunningham, George E 

Cunningham, Harold L. and Cor- 

rine 

Cunningham, Robert M 

Cushing, Gustave 

Dahl, Thyra 

Damico, Louise 

Damico, Ralph P 

Danosky, Edward A 

Danosky, Edward A. and Mary 

C 

Danosky, Stephania 

Davenport, Robert H., Jr 

Davis, Alfred M 

Davis, D. Bradford and Barbara 

G 

Davis, E. Russell 

Davis, Francis J. and Shirley H.. 

Davis, H. R., Jr 

Davis, Prescott L 

Davis, Saville R. and Anita V. . . 

Davison, Archibald T 

Davison, Everett H 

Davol, George 

Dean, Emma W 

Dean, Lewis W 

Dean, William M 

Dean, William M. and Lorraine 

C 

Dee, Helena A 

Dee, Thomas J 

DeFord, William and Elinor S. . . 
Denehy, Edward J. and Berna- 

detta J 

Denio, F. Winchester 

DeNormandie, Alice W 

DeNormandie, James 

DeNormandie, James and Martha 



$1,000 



200 

50 
370 



1,000 

1,250 

600 
1,300 
100 
150 
2,130 
300 
600 

150 

1,250 



200 



900 
9,875 



$44 00 



8 80 



16 28 



44 00 
55 00 

26 40 

57 20 



4 

6 

101 

13 



40 
60 
64 

20 



26 40 

6 60 

55 00 



8 80 



39 60 
434 50 



$3,000 

6,500 

500 

3,700 
4,915 

3,600 
2,900 
4,500 
5,800 
2,350 

1,150 

3,600 
9,650 
4,300 
4,750 

10,200 

19,000 

5,100 

9,100 

7,500 

13,000 

2,600 

3,200 
9,800 
1,000 

3,000 
2,000 
2,200 
7,100 

5,800 
3,500 
34,500 
3,000 
9,950 



$132 00 

286 00 

22 00 

162 80 
216 26 

158 40 
127 60 
198 00 
255 20 
103 40 

50 60 

158 40 

424 60 

189 20 

209 00 

448 80 
836 00 
224 40 

400 40 
330 00 
572 00 
114 40 

140 80 

431 20 

44 00 

132 00 

88 00 
96 80 

312 40 

255 20 
154 00 
1,518 00 
132 00 
437 80 



68 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 


Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 


Tax on 
Personal 
Estate 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 


Tax on 
Real Estate 


DeNormandie, James and Rob- 










ert L 






$33,550 


$1,476 20 
971 30 


DeNormandie, Robert L 






22,075 


DePavla, Dominick 






500 

900 

2,850 


22 00 


Diamond, James E 


39 60 


Dodge, Orien B 


125 40 


Doherty, Anthony J 






5,500 


264 00 


Doherty, Josephine C 


$550 


$24 20 


11,000 


484 00 


Doherty, Mary E., Margaret A., 










Marjorie J 






2,000 


88 00 


Doherty, Matthew H., d/b/as 










Doherty's Garage 


1,600 


70 40 






Doherty, Matthew H. and Eliza- 










beth H 






9,800 
2,880 


431 20 


Dole, Gertrude E 


126 72 


Dominichello, Frank and Mattie 










M 


485 


21 34 


3,500 


156 20 


Donaldson, Estate of Charlotte H. 






8,000 


352 00 


Donaldson, Gordon A. and Eliza- 










beth A 






7,000 


308 00 


Donaldson, Malcolm D 


400 


17 60 


8,250 


363 00 


Donaldson, Robert D 






67,600 


2,974 40 


Donaldson, Robert D., Jr 






6,500 


28. 00 


Donnelly, Bernard F. and Jose- 










phine B 






1,500 


66 00 


Dorian, Paul and Newart 






3,750 


165 00 


Dougherty, Andrew J 


2,710 


119 24 


6,350 


279 40 


Dougherty, Dennis M 






2,900 


127 60 


Dresser, Charles N. and Ruth C 


200 


8 80 


6,200 


272 80 


DuBois, Anson M. and Olive S. . . 






5,100 


224 40 


DuBois, Eliot and Barbara 






250 


11 00 


Eaton, Gertrude S 


300 


13 20 


7,500 
5,625 


330 00 


Ehlert, Heirs of Ellen 


247 50 


Eldridge, Hudson S. and Barbara 










H 






1,250 


55 00 


Emerson, Beatrice W. and Doro- 










thy W. Boulet 






1,300 


57 20 


Emerson, Heirs of Edward W. . . . 






500 


22 00 


Emerson, Heirs of Ralph W 






500 


22 00 


Emmons, A. B 


100 


4 40 






Erickson, Leonard V. and Mar- 










tha F 


150 


6 60 


5,000 


220 00 


East, John A. and Edla A 






3,500 


154 00 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



69 



Name of Taxpayer 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 


Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 


Tax on 
Real Estate 


Fairbanks, Rollin 


$900 


$39 60 


$14,500 


$638 00 


Farley, Louis C, Jr. and Isabel 










K 






4,500 


198 00 


Farnsworth, Kenneth C. and 










Marguerite M 


900 


39 60 


15,500 


682 00 


Farrar, Estate of Edward R. . . . 






3,500 


154 00 


Faunce, Anthony 


550 


24 20 






Fedock, Metro and Hazel A. . . . 






2,650 


116 60 


Fernald, Alvin E 


200 


8 80 


5,900 


259 60 


Fillmore, Bruce R. and Eleanor 




L 


100 
300 


4 40 
13 20 


4,400 
6,800 


193 60 


Fillmore, Ernest C 


299 20 


Fitts, Charles K. and Gertrude 










W 


1,100 


48 40 


16,500 


726 00 


Flanagan, James and Wilhelmina 










G 


600 


26 40 


700 
10,600 


30 80 


Fleck, Richard C. and Frances R. 


466 40 


Fletcher, Walter B. and Helen F. 


300 


13 20 


6,750 


297 00 


Flint, Edward W., Ex. u/w 










Ephraim B. Flint . . , 






1,900 


83 60 


Flint, Henry R 


500 


22 00 






Flint, Josephine R 


150 


6 60 


11,000 


484 00 


Flint, Warren F 


3,675 


161 70 


13,000 


572 00 


Floyd, Olive B 






4,500 


198 00 


Flynn, Frank J 






400 


17 60 


Flynn, Helen C 


450 


19 80 


8,700 


382 80 


Foley, Harold F. and Rita E 






1,300 


57 20 


Forbes, Annabel Otis 


200 


8 80 


5,500 
9,250 


242 00 


Ford, Katherine Morrow 


407 00 


Fradd, Norman W 


250 


11 00 


7,500 


330 00 


Frazier, Joseph G. and Harriet E. 






4,200 


184 80 


Fryatt, Thomas F 


100 


4 40 


5,200 


228 80 


Fuller, Ernest L. and Doris 


500 


22 00 


9,300 


409 20 


Garland, Joseph and Mira C 






2,500 


110 00 


Gary, John E. and Maida F 


300 


13 20 


7,000 


308 00 


Geary, Edward T. and Katherine 










E 






8,300 
4,200 


365 20 


Gertz, George L. and Edith A. . . . 






184 80 


Giblin, Mary E. and Ruth E 


300 


13 20 


6,630 


291 72 


Giddy, Osman & Helen M 


350 


15 40 


8,000 


352 00 


Gilbert, John W. and Josephine 










L 






2,000 


88 00 


Gilbert, Mary J 






2,500 


110 00 







70 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Gilboy, Glennon and Elizabeth 
W 

Giles, Edmund W 

Giles, Edmund W. and Muriel H 

Giles, Muriel 

Giles, Thomas T 

Giles, Thomas T. and Stella A. . 

Gilfoy, Donald A. and Helen B. . , 

Gill, Mary 

Glazier, L. Gordon and Gertrude . 

Goodfellow, Daniel R. and Elea- 
nora A 

Gordon, Marie C 

Grabill, Elliott V. and Martha L. 

Graf, Malcolm 

Grason, Rufus L. and Edna B. . 

Graves, Helen P 

Gray, Robert W 

Greco, Louis and Katherine T 
Silvia U. and Antonia DiStef- 
ano 

Greene, Frederick H., Jr. and 
Helen H 

Griffin, Harriet S 

Grinnell, William L. and Virginia 
B 



Gropius, Walter and Use 

Gross, T. A. O., and Judith C. F. . 
Gustafson, Edwin Anton and 

Doris Margaret 

Haden, Russell L. and Constance 



J. 



Hagerty, Julia C 

Hagmann, Fridolin 

Hagmann, Otto 

Haley, Arthur E 

Hamilton, Bessie E 

Hammer, Sarah J 

Hanlon, Albert W 

Harding, Catherine 

Harling, Ernest J 

Harnish, Ezra W. and Eugenia D. 
Harrington, Estate of F. Frank . . 



$600 
1,350 



1,925 

1,400 
100 
650 



250 
300 



500 
350 

300 
900 
150 



150 

150 
300 
100 



$26 40 
59 40 



84 70 

61 60 

4 40 
28 60 



11 00 
13 20 



22 00 
15 40 

13 20 

39 60 

6 60 



6 60 

6 60 
13 20 

4 40 



$10,000 

7,100 
5,100 

10,000 

13,200 

9,500 

19,000 

4,800 

4,200 

11,000 

2,000 

700 

6,600 



600 

10,500 
7,000 

7,000 

14,500 

5,300 

3,500 

4,000 
3,000 
8,500 

1,500 
4,800 
6,900 
5,000 
2,500 
4,500 
4,300 
1,750 



$440 00 

3:2 40 
224 40 

440 00 
580 80 
418 00 
836 00 

211 20 

184 80 

484 00 

88 00 

30 80 

290 40 



26 40 

462 00 
308 00 

308 00 
638 00 
233 20 

154 00 

176 00 
132 00 
374 00 

66 00 
211 20 
303 60 
220 00 
110 00 
198 00 
189 20 

77 00 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



71 



Name of Taxpayer 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 


Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 


Tax on 
Real Estate 


Harrington, Katherine A 






$2,000 


$88 00 


Harrington, Winthrop W 






4,100 


180 40 


Hart, Joseph S 






8,500 


374 00 


Hart, Frederick R 


$500 


$22 00 


200 
9,200 


8 80 


Hart, William E. and Isabella C. . 


404 80 


Hartman, Henry F 






3,700 


162 80 


Hartwell Farm 


1,800 


79 20 






Hatheway, Louise A 


6,760 


297 44 


133,950 


5,893 80 


Hayden, Nellie B 






300 


13 20 


Healey, Harry R., Jr. and Jeanne 




C 






5,200 


228 80 


Heck, Stanley and Mary H 


2,200 


96 80 


33,800 


1,487 20 


Hedge, Mary A 


550 


24 20 


10,500 


462 00 


Helburn, Peter and Margaret . . . 






700 


30 80 


Henderson, Ernest 


2,450 


107 80 






Henderson, Gerard C. and Edith 










M 


100 


4 40 


5,000 


220 00 


Henderson, Mary S 






46,700 


'2,054 80 


Henley, Archibald and Lottie . . . 






4,640 


204 16 


Henley, Archie E. and Wilfred B. 






4,500 


198 00 


Henley, Merrill J. or Ida 






200 


8 80 


Henry, Hall M. and Addie Mc- 










Allister 


600 


26 40 


10,000 


440 00 


Herlihy, Maurice K. and Jean E. . 






3,300 


145 20 


Herman, Edwards W 


600 


26 40 


12,200 
700 


536 80 


Herman, John E. and Anne B. . . . 


30 80 


Herthel, Stephen W. and Evelyn 










S 


550 


24 20 


13,650 


600 60 


Hess, Kenneth W. and Alice B. . . 


550 


24 20 


9,500 


418 00 


Hewes, Charles A. and Annie F. . 




y 


3,500 


154 00 


Hills, H. Bigelow and Florence R. 


1,100 


48 40 


16,000 


704 00 


Hinds, Evelyn W 


200 


8 80 


8,000 


352 00 


Hoar, George W. and Norman W. 






250 


11 00 


Hollingsworth, Lowell M. and 










Florence S 


300 


13 20 


7,000 


308 00 


Holmes, William — d/b/as Lin- 




coln Hardware 


1,500 


66 00 






Hoover, Henry B. and Lucretia J. 


350 


15 40 


7,300 


321 20 


Hornor, Townsend and Barbara 










G 


250 


11 00 


6,000 


264 00 


Houghton, John J. and Lillian . . . 






3,800 


167 20 


Howard, Elizabeth 


400 


17 60 


16,100 


708 40 


Howard, Esther T 


500 


22 00 


9,400 


413 60 







72 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Hoyt, Harrison and Shirley J 

Hunt, Lewis E 

Hunt, Merrill 

Hunt, Pearson and Merrill T. . . . 
Hunt, William F. and Julia Pear 

son 

Hunter, Heirs of Euphemia J. . . . 

Hunter, Robert R 

Huntley, George F. and Lottie D. 
Huntley, Medford E. and Blanche 

L 



Huntley, Oland F. and Alberta T. 

Hurd, Nancy Dabney 

Hutchinson, James 

Hyde, Benjamin D. and Mildred 
B 



Jackson, Dorothy W 

Jacobs, May L 

Jenney, Charles J. and Katrina C. 
Jensen, Holgar J. and Grace A. . . 

Johansen, Rose May 

John, DeWitt H. and Morley 
Johnson, Ernest L. and Grace M. 

Johnson, Fern A 

Jones, Chester L. and Anne B. . . . 

Keene, Clifton R 

Keily, Delbar P. and Gertrude E. 

Keizer, Harold 

Kelliher, John J 

Kennedy, Albert E 

Kennedy Brothers 

Kennedy, John T. and Albert E. . 

Kidd, Wilmot 

Killoran, Martha 

Kimball, Robert M. and Barbara 
P 



Kindleberger, Charles P. and 
Sarah M 

King, Abigail A 

King, William T 

Kinney, Robert C 

Kinsler, Herman F. and Louise 
M 



$500 
250 



$22 00 
11 00 



1,000 


44 00 


50 


2 20 


350 


15 40 


100 


4 40 


400 


17 60 


800 


35 20 


900 


39 60 


150 


6 60 


800 


35 20 


150 


6 60 


150 


6 60 


500 


22 00 


500 


22 00 


150 


6 60 


700 


30 80 


1,050 


46 20 


10 


44 



$2,700 
4,000 

15,000 
6,500 

400 
9,600 

4,700 

3,700 
2,900 
7,150 



8,000 
12,000 
15,000 
5,500 
3,100 
1,500 
1,700 
12,000 
3,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,900 
1,500 
3,800 
5,800 

150 
1,000 
3,850 

9,100 

5,450 
12,000 
15,800 

2,000 

5.500 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



73 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Kirkpatrick, David W. and Mar- 
garet M 

Kistiakowsky, George B. and 

Irma E 

Knowles, Harry B., Jr 

Knowles, Wilma E 

Kolyshkin, George 

Kubik, Charles S. and Emily K. . 
Ladd, Edward H., Jr. and Agnes 

E 

Lahey, Heirs of James 

Lahnstein, Karl F. and Margaret 

A 

Langille, Claire M 

Langton, William G 

Larrabee, Leonard C. and Peggy 

S 

Lavrakas, Fofo 

Lawson, Harold E 

Lawton, John J. and Beatrice G.. 

Leary, Edward B 

Leavitt, Donald P. and Christine 

P 

LeBlanc, Alphonse J. and Alice 

M 

LeBlanc, Philias and Lena 

Lee, Edwin John 

LeMann, John 

Lennon, James V. and Elin 

Leslie, Maurice A. and Annie M. . 
Liddick, Harold S. and Virginia 

D 

Ligda, Myron G. H. and Evelyn 

D 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lincoln, Kenneth C. and Virginia 
Linscott, Donald A., Jr. and 

Grace M 

Litte, Rudolph, James B. Mc- 

Millin, Lloyd R. Allen 

Livengood, Eleanor C. H 

Lorrey, Mildred J 

Lothrop, John W. and Ellen D. . . 



$100 

600 
100 



100 
150 

250 
300 

159 

1,500 

500 
250 



150 



450 



100 



100 
500 



$4 40 

26 40 
4 40 



4 40 
6 60 

11 00 
13 20 

6 60 

66 00 

22 00 
11 00 



6 60 



19 80 



4 40 



4 40 
22 00 



$5,000 

11,500 

5,000 
3,030 
6,000 

5,250 
1,500 

3,200 

7,000 

5,900 
2,150 
7,450 
2,100 
350 

9,000 

2,500 
5,850 
8,800 
2,850 
3,800 
4,340 

5,200 

2,900 

3,000 

4,400 

1,500 

3,800 

5,575 

10,500 



$220 00 
506 00 

220 00 

133 32 
264 00 

231 00 
66 00 

140 80 

308 00 

259 60 
94 60 

327 80 
92 40 

15 40 

396 00 

110 00 
257 40 
387 20 
125 40 
167 20 
190 96 

228 80 

127 60 

132 00 

193 60 

66 00 
167 20 
245 30 
462 00 



74 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Loud, John F. and Mary L 

Lovejoy, Evelene T 

Lummus, John W. and Ann A. . . 

Lunt, Heirs of Charles 

Lustwerk George and Julia 

Lutnicki, Victor A 

Lynch, Edward H., Jr 

Lyon, Edward B. and Constance 
R 



Lyon, Ruth 

Lyons, Winifred A 

MacFarland, Charles C. and Phyl- 
lis M 

MacFarland, Ernest H 

Maclnnis, Daniel A., Jr. and 
Francis Clarke 

Mackenzie, Roland C 

Maclaurin, Richard Colin and 
Ellen.... 

MacLaurin, Rupert and Elfrieda 
C 



MacLean, Heirs of Hector J. — 

M. Arnold MacLean, Adm 

MacLeod, Edward and Hester M. 
MacLeod, Edward, Jr. and Mary 

M 

MacRae, Manning W 

Mahan, Russell P 

Mahar, Raymond and Gertrude 

M 

Mallett, Herbert A. and Eva M 

Manges, Andrew J 

Mann, David W. and Iva S. . . 

Mannarino, Heirs of Anna 

Manning, Joseph J. and Catherine 

L 



Marchetti, John W. and Sarah G. 

Martin, Fred and Marie 

Martin, Wilhelmina W 

Mascari, Leonard E. and Grace 
B 



Matthews, Ida Lucille W. and 
Marion Clark 



$600 
600 



150 



150 

800 
450 



350 



100 
7,050 



100 
450 
100 
400 

300 



$26 40 
26 40 



6 60 



6 60 

35 20 
19 80 



15 40 



4 40 
310 20 



4 40 
19 80 

4 40 
17 60 

13 20 



$10,000 

10,250 

4,050 

2,600 

4,500 

3,600 

3,800 
3,700 
4,130 

2,250 
6,000 

3,300 
12,000 

10,100 

1,000 

4,350 
2,850 

1,100 
5,500 
3,000 

3,200 
2,600 

22,900 
1,500 

4,700 
8,000 
5,000 
9,500 

11,000 

3,500 



$440 00 
451 00 
172 20 
114 40 
198 00 

158 40 

167 20 
162 80 
181 72 

99 00 
264 00 

145 20 
528 00 

444 40 

44 00 

191 40 
125 40 

48 40 
242 00 
132 00 

140 80 
114 40 

1,007 60 
66 00 

206 80 
352 00 
220 00 
418 00 

484 00 

154 00 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



75 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



McClennen, Alan and Louise H. . 

McCune, William J. and Eliza 
beth 

McHugh, Katherine 

McHugh, Mary L 

McPherson, Paul and Margaret 
M 

McShane, Nellie 

Meade, Edmund J. and Eleanor 
H 

Melanson, Leonard J. and Mary. 

Meriam, Richard R. and Alice G. 

Meyer, Robert V. 

Michel, Jules J. and Marie C 

Militzer, Raymond E. and Mar- 
tha B 

Miller, Henry D. and Mary E 

Miller, Mary G 

Mills, Cecil R. and Lillian M 

Monks, Caroline T 

Monks, John P. and Ann S 

Moody, Charles P. and Josephine 
G 

Moore, Herbert L., Jr. and Sylvia 
W 

Moore, Paul 

Morgan, Daniel J. and Angelina 
M 

Morgan, Henry M. and Gwen G. 

Morris, Milliage E. and Beatrice 
M 

Morris, Robert E. F. and Clara 
D 

Morris, Robert H. and Irene S. . . 

Morrissey, Elizabeth Ann 

Morrissey, John Joseph 

Morse, Thomas R 

Moses, John P. and Alice W 

Moszka, Stanley E. and Anna . . . 

Mount Auburn Cemetery 

Mukhitarian, Samuel and Steph- 
anie 

Murphy, Bridget 



$750 
. 350 



650 
150 

450 



400 
200 

100 
4,100 

250 

600 



200 
135 



600 
700 
250 



100 



$33 00 
15 40 



28 60 

6 60 

19 80 



17 60 

8 80 

4 40 
180 40 

11 00 

26 40 



8 80 
5 94 



26 40 
30 80 
11 00 



4 40 



$12,500 

8,300 

500 

6,000 

3,150 
100 

3,500 
4,000 

12,350 
5,300 

10,040 

4,000 
8,300 
6,000 
2,500 
5,750 
48,900 

6,100 

10,200 
100 

350 
7,000 

1,500 

3,700 
4,500 
1,900 
4,500 
12,300 
6,700 
2,800 
2,500 

3,050 
4,500 



$550 00 

365 20 

22 00 

264 00 

138 60 

4 40 

154 00 
176 00 

543 40 
233 20 
441 76 

176 00 
365 20 
264 00 
110 00 

253 00 

2,151 60 

268 40 

448 80 
4 40 

15 40 
308 00 

66 00 

162 80 
198 00 
83 60 
198 00 
541 20 
294 80 
123 20 
110 00 

134 20 
198 00 



76 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 




$2,950 


$6 60 


5,000 




3,500 




3,500 




50 


19 80 


10,750 




4,200 


6 60 


5,400 




1,000 




9,000 


17 60 


8,250 




900 


106 70 


4,400 


2,675 20 


4,000 




8,500 


11 00 


7,300 


8 80 


5,800 


15 40 


7,500 


il 00 


6,700 


8 80 


6,500 




1,500 


8 80 


5,900 


4 40 






300 


6 60 


5,650 


4 40 


5,000 




3,800 




2,500 


35 20 


21,440 


77 00 


35,000 


15 40 


7,000 




3,800 


17 60 


8,000 




200 


4 40 


4,500 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Murphy, Cyrus W. and Persis S. . 

Murphy, Edward W 

Murphy, Heirs of Jeremiah 

Murphy, Mina Dorothea 

Murphy, Otis W. and Patricia . . . 

Murphy, William F 

Neary, Patrick J. and Alice B. . . . 
Nelson, Albert E. and Marjorie 



Nelson, Erik J 

Nelson, W. Newton and Eleanor 

R 

Neumann, Ernest P. and Sylvia. 

Neville, Heirs of Ellen M 

Neville, Mary A. and Delia M. . . 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co 

Newell, Joseph S. and Lena M. . . 
Newton, Harland B. and Ethel H. 

Newton, Hazel H 

Nichols, Geraldine M. and Harold 

F 



Niles, Robert I. and Virginia M.. 

Norton, Paul L 

Norton, Thomas F., Trustee .... 

Nystrom, Foster H. and Edna C. 

Ober, Clyde 

Ockels, Theodore S. and Rose- 
marie G 

Ogden, Warren G., Jr 

O'Reilly, Andrew J. and Jose- 
phine M 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. and Camilla 
M "... 

Orton, Floyd E. and Ora Mae . . . 

Osborne, Gordon and Freda W. . . 

O'Sullivan, William J. and Mary 
E 



Paddock, Louis E. and Anne E. . . 
Page, Elliott F. and Emily R. . . . 
Page, William N. and Elizabeth 



Paine, Charles H 

Pallotta, Henry and Eleanor A. . 



$150 



450 



150 



400 

2,425 
60,800 

250 
200 

350 
250 
200 

200 
100 



150 
100 



800 

1,750 
350 



400 
100 



$129 80 
220 00 
154 00 
154 00 
2 20 
473 00 
184 80 

237 60 
44 00 

396 00 
363 00 
39 60 
193 60 
176 00 
374 00 
321 20 
255 20 

330 00 
294 80 
286 00 
66 00 
259 60 



13 20 
248 60 

220 00 

176 20 
110 00 
943 36 

1,540 00 
308 00 
167 20 

352 00 

8 80 

198 00 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



77 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Palmer, Waldo E. and Eleanor M 

Panetta, Pasquale and Mary . . . 

Parker, Francis B. and Joanne B. 

Parker, Jackson 

Parker, William J., Jr 

Parks, Henry A. and Harriett A. . 

Pattinson, Mary I 

Pavlo, Samuel G 

Pazzano, Charles H., Jr. and 
Mary R 

Peck, Mildred E 

Pederson, Sarah A 

Peirce, Harriet T 

Pellandini, Robert T. and Vir- 
ginia A 

Peloquin, Roy J. and Alice M. . . . 

Pertzoff , Constantin A. and Olga . 

Pertzoff , Olga 

Peterson, Edward H. and Vir- 
ginia 

Peterson, John R. and Mary Vir- 
ginia 

Peterson, Roy C 

Phillips, Henry B. and Charlotte 
T 

Pierce, Charles Eliot and Dora 
Redway 

Place, Daniel N 

Poinier, Donald and Roberta .... 

Pollard, Frederick H., et al 

Poole, Ruth E. and Frederick . . . 

Poor, Jane H. and Marion A. 
Fitch 

Potter, Howard L. and Barbara 
V 

Preston, Jean W 

Primak, John and Lena 

Prouty, C. Newton 

Quarton, Gardner and Frances . . 

Queen, Robert C. and Hester M. . 

Rand, Janet G 

Rand, Lucy K 

Rand, William 



$300 
585 



100 
3,700 



1,100 
550 
100 



250 

1,700 

735 



200 
1,500 



$13 20 

25 74 



4 40 

162 80 



48 40 

24 20 

4 40 



11 00 
74 80 

32 34 



8 80 
66 00 



$7,500 
4,030 
1,750 
2,500 
3,625 
2,300 
6,600 
400 

250 
3,850 
1,100 
5,000 

4,700 

4,300 

38,740 

3,000 

750 

2,000 
3,300 

16,250 

12,500 
1,150 
4,900 

13,000 
3,500 

12,500 

6,000 

26,500 

10,300 

1,000 

8,030 

4,500 

6,000 

21,500 



$330 00 
177 32 

77 00 
110 00 
159 50 
101 20 
290 40 

17 60 

11 00 
169 40 

48 40 
220 00 

206 80 

189 20 

1,704 56 

132 00 

S3 00 

88 00 
145 20 

715 00 

550 00 

50 60 

215 60 

572 00 
154 00 

550 00 

264 00 
1,166 00 
453 20 
44 00 
353 32 
198 00 
264 00 
946 00 



78 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Rando, Giovanina 

Rando, Thomas 

Rasmussen, Robert F. and Doris 
A. Bardsley 

Rice, Arthur W., Jr. and Pauline 
K 

Rice, Richard B. and Grace W. . . 

Rice, Warren A. and Ruth H. . . . 

Richardson, Howard C 

Richardson, Lyle M 

Riley, Allston and Marion 

Roach, James L. and Dora J 

Robbins, Roland W. and Geral- 
dine 

Roberti, Norbert F 

Robichaud, George V. and Emma 

Robinson, Dora J 

Robinson, Morris R 

Robus, Tamzin K 

Rodiman, Mildred M 

Rogers, Edward H 

Rogers, John H 

Rollins, Elmer A., Trustee 

Rood, Allan and Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. and Eliza- 
beth M 

Rooney, John J. and Margaret C. 

Rooney, Leonard A. and Helen L. 

Root, Harriet E 

Root, Lily Frederica ........... 

Rouner, Thomas J. and Doris J.. 

Rowe, Lawrence L. and Mildred 
M 

Rowe, Standish S 

Rudzki, Jan A. and Mary 

Russes, Anthony L 

Russes, Frances 

Ryan, Heirs of Anastasia 

Ryan, Frank A 

Ryan, James R 

Ryan, Lawrence 

Ryan, Mary J 

Santangelo, Laura B. and John . . 



$500 



800 

30 

1,750 



150 

100 
100 

1,010 
200 

250 

150 

325 



5 
100 



100 



$22 00 



35 20 

1 32 

77 00 



6 60 

4 40 
4 40 



44 44 
8 80 

11 00 

6 60 



14 30 



22 
4 40 



4 40 



$4,850 



2,500 

12,200 

3,300 

9,100 

200 

2,250 

10,400 

300 

3,000 
4,250 
4,500 
3,500 

2,500 
1,000 
19,000 
7,000 
800 
6,100 

5,300 
1,500 
3,000 
600 
2,100 
8,250 

1,000 
5,500 
4,150 

2,900 

2,400 

100 

3,500 

4,000 

350 



$213 40 



110 00 

536 80 

145 20 

400 40 

8 80 

99 00 
457 60 

13 20 

132 00 
187 00 
198 00 
154 00 

110 00 

44 00 
836 00 
308 00 

35 20 
268 40 

233 20 
66 00 

132 00 
26 40 
92 40 

363 00 

44 00 
242 00 
182 60 

127 60 

105 60 

4 40 

154 00 

176 00 

15 40 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



79 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 

Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Sargent, Francis B 

Savage, Orrin T 

Sawtell, Clement C. and Adelaide 

I 

Schaal, Albert A. and Zelpha M. . 

Schlaifer, Robert 

Schofield, Mary A 

Schumacher, August 

Schumacher, August and Mary L. 
Schwann, William and Sonya .... 

Scott, Herman H 

Scott, Robert W 

Sears, Olga 

Secora, Julia 

Seeckts, Marion E 

Seeckts, Marion E. and Ehlert . . 
Shank, Maurice E. and Virginia 

L 

Shaw, Alice DeS 

Shea, Heirs of Cornelius T 

Sheffield, William E. and Marion 

L 

Shepard, Paul F 

Sherman, Daniel E 

Sherman, Daniel E., Jr 

Sherman, Mary J 

Sherwin, Edward V 

Short, William P. and Priscilla L. 
Shumway, Herbert L. and Violet 

A 

Siler, William C. and Barbara 

Jean 

Silva, Heirs of Manuel 

Silva Mary 

Simonds, Anthony J 

Sims, Mildred A 

Small, William A. and Dolina N. . 
Smith, Carl D. and Florence C. . . 
Smith, John E. and Helen M. . . . 

Smith, Sumner 

Smith-Peterson, Helda D 

Snelling, Caroline 

Snelling, Charles A 



$200 

150 

100 
250 



300 

350 

1,200 



1,350 

100 

550 

400 
300 

5,525 



200 

150 

150 

2,125 

100 



$8 80 



6 60 



4 

11 



13 20 
15 40 

52 80 



59 40 

4 40 

24 20 

17 60 
13 20 

243 10 



80 
60 
60 
50 



4 40 



$10,000 



6,000 
200 



2,220 
1,000 
7,450 
7,500 
30,400 
1,000 
2,000 
4,000 
500 

1,200 

20,000 

5,900 

4,600 
4,650 
9,800 
5,250 
150 
1,500 
8,200 

7,200 

4,400 
21,500 

300 
1,700 
6,200 
5,500 
5,000 
55,700 
2,150 
4,500 
4,100 



$440 00 



264 00 
8 80 



97 68 

44 00 

327 80 

330 00 

1,337 60 

44 00 

88 00 

176 00 

22 00 

52 80 
880 00 
259 60 

202 40 
204 60 
431 20 
231 00 
6 60 
66 00 
360 80 

316 80 

193 60 
946 00 

13 20 

74 80 

272 80 

242 00 

220 00 

2,450 80 

94 60 

198 00 

180 40 



80 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Snelling, Dorothy R 

Snelling, Howard and Elizabeth. 

Snider, Joseph L. and Greta W. . . 

Snow, Clayton R 

Soderberg, C. R., Jr 

Sorenson, Heirs of Hans 

Sorenson, J. Oscar 

Spence, Robert A. and Helen M.. 

Spooner, Lily T 

Sterner, John and Janice M 

Stevens, Kimball C. and Eleanor 
G 

Stewart, Blanche L 

Stockellburg, Arthur A. and Jen- 
nie L 

Stone, Edith C 

Stratton, Katherine W 

Street, Earle B. and Janet H. . . 

Stuart, Edward T 

Sturgis, Alanson H., Jr. and Anne 
H 

Sullivan, Winifred P 

Swanson, Alfred and Alma 

Swanson, Arthur W. and Helen 
K 

Swanson Pontiac, Inc 

Swift, Orlando B. and Janice B. . . 

Swinconeck, John J 

Taillacq, Elsie 

Tarbell, Charles L 

Tarbell, George G., et at. u/w of 
George G. Tarbell 

Tarbell, George G., Jr 

Tasker, Eliza J 

Taylor, Beulah A 

Taylor, Edward S. and Constance 
R 



Taylor, Frederick B 

Taylor, Harold F. and Edward P 
Teabo, Eugene R. and Alice M. . . 

Tead, John C. and Doris F 

Tead, Stanley H. and Eleanor K. 
Tew, John B 



$100 
200 

100 



150 
250 
100 

500 

100 
375 
425 
400 



800 
400 

150 

150 
300 



350 
1,000 



$4 40 
8 80 

4 40 



6 60 

11 00 

4 40 



22 00 

4 40 

16 50 
18 70 

17 60 



35 20 
17 60 

6 60 

6 60 
13 20 



15 40 
44 00 



$4,300 
4,500 
7,650 
1,800 

4,050 
4,250 
6,000 
4,250 
7,400 

5,500 
600 

1,500 

300 

12,100 

3,500 

1,500 

4,550 

800 

7,450 

7,600 
3,500 
7,650 
1,600 
4,000 
1,000 

20,700 
8,000 
3,500 
5,050 

7,150 

2,400 

900 

1,500 

7,000 

15,400 



$189 20 

198 00 

336 60 

79 20 

178 20 
187 00 
264 00 
187 00 
325 60 

242 00 
26 40 

66 00 

13 20 

532 40 

154 00 

66 00 

200 20 

35 20 
327 80 

334 40 
154 00 
336 60 

70 40 
176 00 

44 00 

910 80 
352 00 
154 00 
222 20 

314 60 

105 60 

39 60 

66 00 

308 00 

677 60 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



81 



Name of Taxpayer 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 



Tax on 
Personal 
Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real Estate 



Thiessen, Arthur E. and Laura . . 
Thoma, Henry F. and Mary 

Alice 

Thompson, Ann B 

Thorpe, Margaret M 

Thorson, Robert H. and Kathryn 

F 

Todd, Mabel H 

Todd, Pauline E., Adm. u/w C. 

Lee Todd 

Tonseth, Didrick and Phoebe . . . 
Torode, Herbert L. and Lorraine 

S 

Townsend, John B. and Helen A. 

Tracey, Elizabeth C 

Tracey, Joseph and Elizabeth C. . 
Tracy, John W. and Gertrude G. . 
Trenholm, Charles E. and Harriet 

M 

Tripp, Maurice R 

Trull, Sybill Shaw, Ex 

Tyler, Ethel A., Adm. Est. of 

Fred Tyler 

Tyler, Heirs of Watson 

Umbrello, Francis and Virginia . . 

Vance, Jane K 

Vance, L. Alexander 

Van Leer, Hans L 

Van Leer, Hans L. and Mary K. . 
Van Wart, Walter L. and Mary 

A 

Victor's Market 

Waible, Wendell J. and Florence 

E 

Walker, A. Bruce 

Waller, Ervin S 

Ward, Henry DeC. and Janet G. . 

Warner, Henrietta S 

Warner, Henry 

Warner, Henry E 

Warner, John Burton and Bar- 
bara K 

W'arren, Wallace G 



$700 
150 



200 
1,200 

1,600 



600 



150 



5,700 

900 

4 7 400 



1,500 



700 

600 

1,000 

650 



$30 80 
6 60 



8 80 
52 80 

70 40 



26 40 



6 60 



250 80 

39 60 
193 60 



66 00 



39 80 

26 40 
44 00 

28 60 



$13,500 

5,000 
1,000 

5,750 

7,100 
18,500 

26,900 
1,850 

3,000 
500 

8,300 
500 

2,830 

725 

200 

2,700 

2,700 

8,950 

16,000 

900 
11,000 

1,600 



5,700 

250 

500 

12,500 

9,500 

20,050 

10,700 
5,150 



$594 00 

220 00 
44 00 

253 00 

312 40 
814 00 

1,183 60 
81 40 

132 00 
22 00 

365 20 
22 00 

124 52 

31 90 

8 80 

118 80 
118 80 
393 80 
704 00 

39 60 
484 00 

70 40 



250 80 

11 00 

22 00 

550 00 

418 00 

882 20 

470 80 
226 60 



82 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Name of Taxpayer 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 


Tax on 
Personal . 
Estate 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 


Tax on 
Real Estate 


Washburn, Mabel L. and Rachel 












W 








$4,400 

100 

3,000 


$193 60 


Washburn, Rachel W 








4 40 


Watt, Norman B. and Martha E. 


132 00 


Webb, John F 


$500 


$22 


00 


9,000 


396 00 


Webb, Rosella 








5,500 


242 00 


Weiner, Julis W., et al. d/b/as 












Wyner Realty Company 








4,600 


202 40 


Wellman, Bertram and Cora B. . . 


150 


6 


60 


5,200 


228 80 


Wells, George and K. W 


400 


17 


60 


8,200 


360 80 


Westcott, A. E 








3,700 


162 80 


Westcott, Charles W. C. and Mary 


10 





44 


3,350 


147 40 


W 7 estcott, Vernon C. and Mary 














200 


8 


80 


5,700 


250 80 


Western Union Tel. & Tel 


2,800 


123 


20 






Weston, Georgianna H 








4,500 


198 00 


Wheeler, Elizabeth, Ann H., 












Mary L. and Ruth A. Gale . . . 


250 


11 


00 


17,150 


754 60 


Whitcomb, Sarah I 


300 


13 


20 


10,000 


440 00 


White, John 


800 


35 


20 






Whittemore, Lester 


100 


4 


40 






Whittier, Charles F. and Ramona 












Calkins 


70 


3 


08 


2,200 


96 80 


Whittleesey, Stephen M. and 












Marjorie T 








3,500 


154 00 


Wilber, Harold T. and Inez ..... 








4,100 


180 40 


Wilbor, John S. and Anne F 








5,500 


242 00 


Wilbur, Richard P. and Charlotte 












W 


100 


4 


40 


4,600 


202 40 


Wildes, Leland A. and Irene E. . . 


150 


6 


60 


6,000 


264 00 


Wilfert, Fred J. and Eleanor M.. 


200 


8 


80 


5,400 


237 60 


Wilfert, Walter A. and Eleanor A. 








200 


8 80 


W T ilfert, Walter A. and Fred J 








600 


26 40 


Wiley, G. Arnold and Helen .... 








4,500 


198 00 


W T ilkie, Earl L. and Virginia A. . . 


100 


4 


40 


4,500 


198 00 


Wilkins, John H. and Aida S 


1,900 


83 


60 


16,000 


704 00 


Wilkshire, Alice E 


350 


15 


40 


100 

8,000 


4 40 


Willard, Henry L. and Helen S. . . 


352 00 


Williams, Edwin L., Jr 








3,200 


140 80 


Williamson, Elizabeth R 








1,300 


57 20 


Wilson, John Otis 


450 


19 


80 


9,100 


400 40 


Wilson, Montgomery S. and Mary 












Ann 


100 


4 


40 


4,750 


209 00 







ASSESSORS' REPORT 



S3 



Name of Taxpayer 



Wilson, William A. and Eleanor 
L 

Winchell, Guilbert 

Winchell, Guilbert and Evelyn . . 

Winchell, Guilbert S 

Wineman, Robert J 

Witham, Arthur B. and Margaret 
F 

Witherton, John R. and Elizabeth 
P 

Wolff, Otto E. . . 

Wood, Frank H. and Jeanne R. . . 

Wood, James and Lizzie 

Woodhull, Dean H. and Martha. 

Woodland Trust 

Worcester, Alice E., et al 

Young, Charlotte Wales 

Young, David B. and Cora S. 

Zander, Helmut A 

Ziegler, Elmer H. and Hilda M. . . 



Aggregate 
Value of 
Personal 
Estate 


Tax on 
Personal 
Estate 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 


Tax on 
Real Estate 


$500 


$22 00 


$9,200 


$404 80 


990 


43 56 










25,000 


1,100 00 






1,800 


79 20 


100 


4 40 






150 


6 60 


3,100 


136 40 


200 


8 80 


5,800 


255 20 






12,500 


550 00 


400 


17 60 


8,200 


360 80 






4,000 


176 00 


50 


2 20 


3,475 


152 90 






420 


18 48 






2,000 


88 00 






3,850 


169 40 






3,150 


138 60 






4,300 


189 20 


150 


6 60 


5,000 


220 00 



84 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



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TREASURER'S REPORT 85 



TREASURER'S REPORT, CALENDAR YEAR, 1951 



January 1, Balance $134,988 38 

Receipts 

Anti-Rabies Dog Clinic 76 50 

Board of Appeals 63 50 

Board of Health 525 25 

Borrowed in anticipation of Tax Receipts 35,000 00 

Borrowed per Article 8, Special Town Meeting 

Bonds Issued 335,000 00 

Premium Received 2,676 65 

Accrued Interest Received 423 40 

Cemetery Fund Income 151 21 

Transfer 1,000 00 

Cemetery, Repairs to Graves 253 25 

Digging Graves 290 00 

City of Cambridge, Taxes 714 16 

Collector of Taxes 253,400 95 

Interest and Costs . . 285 12 

Concord Court Fines 331 38 

deCordova School Equipment Trust Fund Income 646 75 

Highways, Local 25 00 

Machinery 821 20 

Insurance, Dividend 16 38 

Storm Damage . . . . 992 65 

Inspectors, Building, Plumbing and Wiring 370 00 

Interest on Deposits 1,645 85 

Library Fines 222 00 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

Chapter 90, 1950 $5,999 42 

Income Tax 15,756 78 

Corporation Tax 17,593 35 

Highways, Snow Removal 65 00 

Licenses 6 00 

Old Age Assistance 19,262 06 

a/c Loss of Taxes 618 82 

Meals Tax 629 14 

School Aid, Ch. 70 9,802 38 

H. S. Transportation 9,224 38 

Tuition of Children 726 98 

Veteran's Benefits 341 00 

80,025 31 



86 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Miscellaneous, Licenses, etc 

Middlesex County, Dog Tax 

Highways, Chapter 90, 1950 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. Refunds 
Old Age Assistance Refunds 

Recovery 

Planning Board 

Schools, Grammar School Fund Income , 

Tuition and Transportation 

Damage 

Miscellaneous 

Retirement Refund 

Town Clerk, Dog Licenses 

Town Hall Rentals 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance Administration 



Payments 

Selectmen's Orders (see detail) $331,649 40 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

State Parks and Reservations 403 23 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 587 53 

Middlesex County: 

1951 Tax 11,365 85 

Dog Licenses 966 60 

Tuberculosis Hospital 2,502 70 

Tax Anticipation Note Paid 35,000 00 

$382,475 31 

Balance in Banks and U. S. Bills at cost 489,383 84 



90 73 


599 74 


2,500 00 


175 62 


640 46 


40 00 


20 00 


29 63 


165 00 


14 75 


15 21 


80 32 


947 40 


119 00 


15,875 35 


601 05 


$871,859 15 



$871,859 15 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



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96 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



GENERAL FUND 

Assets 

Concord National Bank $47,071 95 

Day Trust Company 64,850 34 

First National Bank of Boston 3,708 82 

Arlington Five Cents Savings Bank 4,501 96 

Belmont Savings Bank 4,160 39 

Beverly Savings Bank 7 4,289 64 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 4,034 96 

Brockton Savings Bank 4,457 40 

Brookline Savings Bank 2,262 13 

Cambridge Savings Bank 4,695 34 

Charlestown Savings Bank 5,000 00 

East Bridgewater Savings Bank 4,464 70 

Franklin Savings Bank 4,580 70 

Home Savings Bank , . . 4,546 83 

Institution for Savings in Roxbury 4,496 23 

Lowell Institution for Savings , 2,217 67 

Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank 4,520 36 

Maiden Savings Bank 2,241 42 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bank 1,149 20 

Newton Savings Bank 4,580 73 

North Avenue Savings Bank 2,283 64 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,794 24 

Whitman Savings Bank 4,610 75 

On Deposit $190,519 40 

U. S. Treasury Bills due 1/24/52 49,939 33 

U. S. Treasury Bills due 2/21/52 49,867 11 

U. S. Treasury Bills due 3/27/52 199,058 00 

$489,383 84 

Taxes, Interest to be Added $11,982 53 

Accounts Receivable: 

State and County, Chapter 90 9,991 20 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, O.A.A 3,204 33 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance 122 76 

Total Assets $514,684 66 

Liabilities and Sitrph<s 

Dog Licenses Due County SI 80 

Road Machinery Fund 2,891 16 

O.A.A. Administration 41 15 

O.A.A 2,844 06 

Aid to Dependent Children 121 93 

deCordova School Equipment Fund 1951 Income 646 75 



TREASURER'S REPORT 97 

Grammar School Fund Income 85 55 

Bonds Sale Premium, Expense 1,807 80 

Accrued Interest Received 776 32 

Overlay Reserves: 1950 $926 36 

1951 2,819 58 

3,745 94 

Unexpended Appropriation Balances: 

Preservation of Town Records 150 00 

Gazette Committee 60 08 

War Memorial Committee 50 00 

Building Code Committee 492 00 

Revision of Town By-Laws 150 00 

Speed Zoning 700 00 

Union Health District Committee 100 00 

Chapter 90, Construction and Maintenance 871 

Highway Building Construction 117 83 

Highway Building Equipment 65 93 

New School Construction 365 33 

New School Addition 368,629 68 

Resurfacing Tennis Courts 10 73 

Cemetery Fund Income 398 79 

Cemetery Permanent Improvements 885 42 

Surplus: 

Overlay Surplus $14,196 13 

General Funds 115,341 57 129,537 70 



$514,684 66 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$170,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $10,000 each De- 
cember 1, 1952-1968, issued under Chapter 208, 
Acts of 1948. 

75,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $5,000 each De- 
cember 1, 1952-1958, and $4,000 each December 1, 
1959-1968, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 

28,000 Highway Equipment Building Loan, 1%%, due 
$4,000 each December 1, 1952-1958, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws as amended . 
250,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $13,000 each De- 
cember 1, 1952-1961, and $12,000 each December 1, 
1962-1971, issued under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

85,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $5,000 each De- 
cember 1, 1952-1956, and $4,000 each December 1, 
1957-1971, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 
as amended. 



98 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



SCHOOL MILK FUND 

Receipts . $1,182 00 

Payments 1,006 48 

December 31, 1951, Balance on Deposit $175 52 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Receipts $407 78 

Payments 278 71 

December 31, 1951, Balance on Deposit $129 07 



WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1951 

1951 
January 1, Balance $9,974 25 



Receipts 
Operating: 

Rates, 1949 47 00 

Meter, 1949 13 77 

Rates, 1950 . 697 00 

Meter, 1950 61 03 

Rates, 1951 19,100 44 

Meter, 1951 1,220 34 

Water Connections 1,875 00 

Rent of Hydrants 3,135 00 

Sale of Pipe 458 64 

Miscellaneous 165 70 

26,773 92 



$36,748 17 



Expenses 
Operating: 

Legal and Research $10,635 84 

Power ." 2,537 29 

Salaries 1,125 00 

Maintenance and Repairs 12,297 96 

Construction 4,057 00 

$30,653 09 

December 31, Balance on Deposit 6,095 08 

$36,748 17 



TREASURER'S REPORT 99 

CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 
Receipts of 1951: 

Proceeds of sale of cemetery lots $1,595 00 

Interest on savings bank deposit 151 21 

$1,746 21 
Deduct: 1951 income paid to General Funds of 

Town of Lincoln $151 21 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 595 00 

Paid to General Funds of Town of Lin- 
coln, per appropriation at 1951 Town 
Meeting 1,000 00 1,746 21 



Savings Deposit at December 31, 1951 
Middlesex Institution for Savings $6,615 99 



FREDERICK B. TAYLOR, 

Treasurer. 



100 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



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102 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF TOWN AUDITOR 



Special Note 

The Treasurer's report on the financial condition of the 
Town, as reported for the end of 1951, understates the resources 
of the Town in one important respect. At December 31, 1951, 
the Town had due from the State of Massachusetts three 
annual installments of ''State Aid" on the cost of the school 
building erected in 1948. The State Building Assistance Com- 
mission has admitted the State's liability for assistance in the 
amount of 25.22% on the cost of this project. At the time of 
going to press the Town's figures, which indicate a cost of about 
$370,000, were being checked before final transmittal. Certain 
minor elements of cost may be disallowed, but it appears that 
the Town will probably collect in 1952 a sum approximating 
$18,660, being four annual installments (of twenty to be paid) 
of $4,665 each. 

When these funds are received, they will be added to the 
Town's "Free Cash" which according to the Treasurer's figures 
already amounted to $90,041 at the end of 1951. When it is 
recalled that the Town's ordinary revenue normally exceeds 
expenses, it seems very important that the Town consider 
what action to take with regard to the unusual addition to Sur- 
plus which is expected in 1952. In this connection, attention 
is called to the Finance Committee's recommendation that 
$25,000 of Free Cash be used for the payment of Town indebt- 
edness coming due in 1952. 

Report 

The routine duties of the Town Auditor comprise : making a 
survey of the financial records and of the financial assets of the 
Town, to determine whether the records have been kept ade- 
quately and if the various assets exist as stated in Town Re- 
ports. It is also commonly considered the duty of an auditor 
to point out where the risks of handling funds could be re- 
duced, to comment on the efficiency of record-keeping methods, 
and to suggest ways in which financial reports can be made 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 103 

more understandable to the reader. The following report 
covers all of these topics in the order named. 



The Town records were checked as follows : 

(1 ) A review was made of the Audit Report prepared by the 
Division of Audits and Accounts of the State Government. 
This audit covered the year 1950, and a similar audit for 1951 
will be prepared early in 1952. The State Auditor made a 
review of all transactions of the year, and discovered no defects 
or irregularities. Therefore the Town Auditor had nothing to 
follow up from this source. 

(2) The Town Auditor selected at random two months of 
1^51 for detailed review of all expenditure records, to deter- 
mine that each payment was properly authorized by the neces- 
sary Town Officers, and that each had been charged to the 
proper accounts. The months chosen were April and Novem- 
ber. The auditor's review leads to the conclusion that the 
records are being kept adequately and honestly. 

(3) It is the Town Auditor's intention, when the State Audit 
for 1951 begins, to discuss with the State Auditor his plans and 
procedures, and to be present with the State Auditor at times 
when the Town Auditor feels that important matters are being 
reviewed. It is expected that this work can be reported on 
orally, if desired, at Town Meeting. 

The only questionable matter discovered, and this has not 
been frequent, is the practice of correcting in pencil the 
amounts of the signed Selectmen's Orders when it is dis- 
covered that there is some error in the amount of payment 
already approved. In all but one of the instances, the penciled 
amount was less than the typed one, and the check drawn was 
in an amount equal to the lower figure. In the case where the 
correction increased the authorized payment, the Auditor 
requested and obtained the approval of the Selectmen for the 
increased amount. 



In view of the unquestioned competence and honesty of the 
Town officers at the present time, it was decided, with the con- 



104 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

sent of these officers, to call to the attention of the Selectmen 
certain ways in which the Town could be more adequately pro- 
tected against loss. The Auditor recommended and the Select- 
men adopted a more extensive program of fidelity bonding, 
with higher limits on certain officers and more people covered. 
The small additional cost is included in the Selectmen's request 
for appropriations. 

Some further subdivision of bank accounts is being con- 
sidered by the Treasurer, in order that the reserve funds of the 
Town can be separately controlled, apart from the smaller 
sums needed for withdrawal for current purposes. 

During his work at the Town Hall, the Auditor was able to 
make minor suggestions which may reduce the time taken in 
record keeping. The Auditor believes that over a period of 
time, if attention is given to the matter, the amount of time 
spent in keeping adequate records of the Town's affairs can be 
substantially reduced. For instance, further savings of time 
seem possible, in connection with the payment of wages and the 
associated withholdings. 



Finally, the Auditor feels that the financial aspects of the 
Town Report can be made more understandable to members 
of the Town if further consideration is given to the manner 
of their presentation. For instance, attention is called to 
improvements in the reports of the Treasurer and the Com- 
missioners of Trust Funds which appear in this Report. Fur- 
ther study of this matter by a special committee is recom- 
mended. Consideration of this matter can be taken under an 
Article in the Warrant submitted by the Town Auditor. 

PEARSON HUNT. 



REPORT OF STATE AUDITOR 105 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Division of Accounts 

State House, Boston 33 



April 27, 1951. 

To the Board of Selectmen: 

Mr. John O. Wilson, Chairman, 

Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the Town of Lincoln for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1950, made in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of a report 
made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant Director 
of Accounts. 

Very truly yours, 

FRANCIS X. LANG, 

Director of A ccounts. 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit 
of the books and accounts of the Town of Lincoln for the year 
ending December 31, 1950, and submit the following report 
thereon : 

An examination and verification was made of the financial 
transactions as recorded on the books of the several depart- 
ments receiving or disbursing money for the town or commit- 
ting bills for collection. 



106 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

The appropriation accounts as kept by the Board of Select- 
men were analyzed and checked with the Town Clerk's records 
of appropriations and with the Finance Committee's record 
of reserve fund transfers. Ledger accounts were compiled, 
and a balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was 
prepared showing the financial condition of the Town on 
December 31, 1950. 

The books and accounts of the Town Treasurer were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The receipts, as recorded, were 
analyzed and compared with the records of the departments 
collecting money for the Town and with other sources from 
which money was paid into the Town treasury. The pay- 
ments were checked with the Selectmen's warrants authorizing 
the disbursement of Town funds. The cash book additions 
were verified, and the cash balance on January 22, 1951 was 
proved by reconciliation of the bank balances with statements 
furnished by the banks of deposit and by examination of the 
savings bank books. 

The payments made for maturing debt and interest were 
compared with the cancelled securities and coupons on file and 
with the amounts falling due. 

The savings bank books and securities representing the in- 
vestment of the several trust and investment funds in the 
custody of the Town Treasurer, the Trust Fund Commission- 
ers, and the directors and trustees of the DeCordova and Dana 
Museum and Park Funds were examined and listed. The in- 
come was proved, the disbursements were verified, and all 
cash balances were proved by reconciliation with statements 
furnished by the banks in which these funds are deposited. 

The records of tax titles held by the Town were examined 
and cheeked. The taxes transferred to the tax title account 
were checked with the Collector's records and the redemptions 
were verified by comparison with the Treasurer's recorded 
receipts. 

The books and accounts of the Tax Collector were examined 
and checked. The tax and excise accounts outstanding at the 
time of the previous examination and all subsequent commit- 
ments were audited and compared with the assessors' warrants 
issued for their collection. The payments to the Treasurer 
were verified, the abatements as recorded were compared with 



REPORT OF STATE AUDITOR 107 

the Assessors' records of abatements granted, the transfers to 
the tax title account were proved, and the outstanding accounts 
were listed and proved. 

The records of the departmental and water accounts were 
examined and checked. The payments to the Treasurer were 
verified, the water discounts and abatements were proved, and 
the outstanding accounts were listed and proved. 

Verification of the outstanding tax, excise, departmental, 
and water accounts was obtained by mailing notices to a num- 
ber of persons whose names appeared on the books as owing 
money to the Town, the replies received thereto indicating 
that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The financial accounts of the Town Clerk were examined 
and checked. The recorded receipts from dog and sporting 
licenses were checked with the record of licenses issued. The 
payments to the Town Treasurer and to the Division of Fisher- 
ies and Game were verified, and the cash on hand on Janu- 
ary 22, 1951 was proved by actual count. 

The surety bonds of the various officials required to furnish 
them for the faithful performance of their duties were examined 
and found to be in proper form. 

The accounts of the boards of selectmen and health, of the 
wire, plumbing, and building inspectors, and of the library de- 
partment, as well as of all other departments collecting money 
for the Town or committing bills for collection, were examined 
and checked, the payments to the Treasurer being checked 
with the Treasurer's recorded receipts. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance sheet, 
are tables showing a reconciliation of the Treasurer's and the 
Collector's cash, summaries of the tax, excise, tax title, de- 
partmental, and water accounts, as well as tables showing the 
transactions and condition of the trust and investment funds. 

While engaged in making the audit cooperation was received 
from the various Town officials, for which, on behalf of my 
assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERMAN B. DINE, 

Assistant Director of Accounts. 



108 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 
Balance Sheet — December 31, 1950 

GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



Assets 
Cash: 

General $134,988 38 

Water 9,974 25 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes : 

Levy of 1949: 

Personal Property $476 00 

Real Estate 2,571 00 

Levy of 1950: 

Personal Property 1,190 72 

Real Estate , 7,604 60 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise : 
Levy of 1950 

Tax Titles 

Departmental : 
Schools 

Water Rates: 

Levy of 1949 $77 27 

Levy of 1950. . 905 06 

Aid to Highways: 

State $6,000 00 

County 2,500 00 

Underestimates 1950: 

State Parks and Reservation Assessment $96 81 

State Audit Assessment 40 56 



$144,962 63 



11,842 32 


4,789 54 


20 00 



77 60 



982 33 



8,500 00 



137 37 



$171,311 79 



REPORT OF STATE AUDITOR 109 

Liabilities and Reserves 



Road Machinery Fund 

Proceeds of Dog Licenses , 

Gift for Schools 

Trust Funds Income: 

Julian DeCordova School Equipment 

Fund 

Grammar School Fund 

Cemetery Investment Fund 

Overestimates 1950: 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Tax 

Premium and Accrued Interest on Loan . . 

Federal Grants: 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Administration 

Aid 

Old Age Assistance: 

Administration 

Aid 

Unexpended Appropriation Balances: 

Planning Board Research 

Building Code Committee 

Fire Department Equipment 

Highway — Town Barn 

Highway Building Equipment 

Schools — Boiler 

Elementary School Construction 

Cemeteries 

Gazette 

Tennis Courts — Repair 

War Memorial 

Reserve Fund — Overlay Surplus 

Overlay Reserve for Abatement of Taxes: 

Levy of 1949 

Levy of 1950 





$2,069 96 




21 00 




17 35 


$218 01 




55 92 




247 58 






521 51 


$567 69 


2,143 12 






2,710 81 






352 92 


$6 62 




115 31 




35 23 




99 65 






256 81 




$1,000 00 




37 00 




1,343 00 




117 83 




65 93 




4,000 00 




365 33 




147 22 




60 08 




236 74 




50 00 






7,423 13 






17,857 52 


$3,047 00 




3,414 93 


f\ A6.1 Q7 



110 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise $4,789 54 

Tax Title 20 00 

Departmental 77 60 

Water 982 33 

Aid to Highways 8,500 00 

Surplus Revenue: 

General $109,275 13 

Water * 9,974 25 

DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt $292,000 00 

Highway Loan 

Schoolhouse Loans 



14,369 47 



119,249 38 



$171,311 79 



$292,000 00 

$32,000 00 
260,000 00 



$292,000 00 



REPORT OF STATE AUDITOR 111 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Town Treasurer $19,212 73 

In Custody of Commissioners 204,554 12 

In Custody of Directors 13,165 95 

In Custody of Trustees 1,623,997 74 

$1,860,930 54 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds $13,191 74 

Cemetery Investment Fund 6,020 99 

$19,212 73 

John H. Pierce Hospital and Park Fund . . $38,638 04 

Bemis Lecture Fund 32,355 55 

Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund 25,001 50 

Donald Gordon Recreation Fund 5,383 81 

Grammar School Fund 1,217 52 

Abbie J. Stearns Silent Poor Fund 2,855 77 

Charles S. Smith High School Fund 87,683 79 

Julia A. Bemis Library Fund 684 05 

Codman Library Fund 474 59 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 1,114 57 

George Russell Library Fund 415 74 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 1,930 00 

George C. Tarbell Library Fund 3,138 38 

Hattie Hoar Howard Library Fund 100 00 

David W. Mann Library Fund 105 70 

Hugh Anthony Gaskell Fund 158 89 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Library 

Fund 1,235 46 

General Library Fund 203 00 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Library Fund ... 1,301 03 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Library Fund . . 64 00 

Library Income Account 492 73 

204,554 12 

The DeCordova and Dana Museum and 

Park Maintenance Fund 13,165 95 

The DeCordova and Dana Museum and 

Park Funds: K 

Number 1 $146,013 87 

2 7,020 70 

3 ...,. -.1,470,963 17 

1,623,997 74 



$1,860,930 54 



112 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



For the information of those reading this report, the invest- 
ment of Town Trust Funds under the supervision of the Trust 
Fund Commissioners is now restricted by law to certain types 
of savings deposits and bonds or notes legal for savings banks 
in Massachusetts. 

The present securities held in the Town Trust Funds, in the 
opinion of the Commissioners, were purchased in conformity 
with the law. They reflect the rates prevailing on legal securi- 
ties during the war years, and the recent purchase of some 
legal securities other than United States Government Bonds. 

As long as the highest grade legal investments, other than 
United States Government Bonds, gave a return only slightly 
better than United States Government Bond issues, it seemed 
sensible, for the most part, to purchase the latter. Recently, 
the return obtainable from legal bonds other than United 
States Government issues has improved sufficiently to make 
them (the non-Government issues) in some cases considerably 
more attractive from the income point of view than United 
States Government Bonds. 

As a consequence of this relative change a number of legal 
bonds other than United States Governments have been 
purchased. 



Bemis Lecture Fund 






Cash Account 






Cash balance at January 1, 1951 




$534 22 


Add: Income received in 1951: 






U.S.A. bond interest 


$495 00 

382 50 

26 00 




Other bond interest 




Savings bank interest 


903 50 






$1,437 72 



COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS 



113 



Deduct: Payments per order of Fund Trustees: 

January 19, Bruce C. Hopper 

February 12, James Coletta 

March 16, Rufus Rose 

April 20, Dr. Ruroy Sibley 


$50 00 
75 00 

125 00 

200 00 
80 00 

150 00 




November 23, Tom Two Arrows 

December 7, Nemone Balfour 








Total for lectures 


$680 00 

136 18 

18 70 

6 00 

21 97 




Printing and postage 




Janitor service at lectures 




Taxi hire 




Expense of maintaining mailing list 




Trustees' orders 

Safe deposit box rent 


$862 85 
4 00 


866 85 


Cash balance at December 31, 1951 




$570 87 



Cash and Securities at December Ji, 1951 

Cash balance on hand (accumulated in- 
come) $570 87 

$3,000 Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe R.R. 

General 4's due 1995 3,000 00 

3,000 Louisville & Nashville R.R., A.K. & 

C. Division 4% due 1955 3,000 00 

3,000 New England Power Co. 3\i% due 

1961 3,000 00 

2,000 Southern Pacific R.R. Equipment 

Trust "Q" 2}i% due 1954 1,981 29 

U.S.A. Series "G" 234% bonds, at cost: 

$11,000 due September 1, 1956 11,000 00 

3,000 due April 1, 1957 3,000 00 

4,800 due May 1, 1957 4,800 00 

1,000 due November 1, 1959 1,000 00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,040 04 

$32,392 20 

Accumulated income $570 87 

Principal 31,821 33 



$32,392 20 



114 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

DeCordova School Equipment Fund 

Cash Account 
Cash balance at January 1, 1951 $ None 

Income received in 1951: 

U.S.A. bond interest $339 62 

Other bond interest 65 84 

Savings bank interest 185 95 

Dividends 56 25 



$647 66 
Less accrued interest paid on bonds pur- 
chased 91 646 75 



Bond interest credited to Principal to amortize purchase 

premiums 4 24 

Proceeds of sale of First National Bank of Boston rights, 

credited to book value of stock 8 95 

Withdrawal from Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,015 00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 2y 2 % due 1972-67, exchanged for 

$2,000 2%% Treasury bonds due 1980-75, contra 2,033 15 



$3,708 09 



Deduct: Net income for 1951 paid to Town 

of Lincoln, General Funds $646 75 

Purchase of $1,000 Baltimore & 
Ohio R. R. Equip. Trust Series 

"CC" 3% due Sept. 1961 997 86 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 2%% regis- 
tered bonds due April 1, 1980- 
75, received in exchange for 
2Y 2 % bonds, contra 2,033 15 3,677 76 



Cash balance at December 31, 1951 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1951 

Cash balance on hand : 

Cambridge Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

$10,000 U.S.A. Series "G" 2Y 2 % due April 1, 1958, at cost. 
1,000 U.S.A. Series "G" 2Y 2 % due November 1, 1959, 

at cost 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 23^% due March 15, 1970-65 

2,000 U.S. Treasury Reg. 2%% due April 1, 1980-75 

1,000 Southern Pacific R. R. Equip. Trust "Q" 2H% 

due October 1, 1954 990 65 



$30 33 


$30 33 


3,727 52 


2,727 53 


10.000 00 


1,000 00 


1,017 23 


2,032 45 



COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS 115 

1,000 Western Maryland Rwy. 4-43^% due October 1, 

1969 SI, 029 73 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Equip. Trust "CC" 3% 

due September 1, 1961 997 86 

25 shares First National Bank of Boston, capital stock 1,448 20 



§25,001 50 



Charles Sumner Smith School and Playground Fund 

Cash Account 
Cash balance at January 1, 1951 $2 87 

Add: Income received in 1951: 

U.S.A. bond interest $937 50 

Other bond interest 102 14 

Savings bank interest 303 51 1,343 15 

Bond interest credited to Principal to amortize pur- 
chase premiums 162 

Withdrawn from savings banks : 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 2,211 00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 970 00 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,795 00 

$ 6,323 64 

Deduct: Safe deposit box rent $4 00 

Accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 19 77 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 303 51 

Bonds purchased.: 

$2,000 Great Northern Rwy. 
Equipment Trust Series " M" 
2%% due October 1, 1960. . 2,004 09 

$2,000 Southern California Edi- 
son Co. 3% due September 1, 

1965 2,040 70 

$1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. 
Equipment Trust Series" CC" 
3% due September 1, 1961 . . 997 86 

$1,000 American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 2%% due 
1975 952 91 6,322 84 

Cash balance at December 31, 1951 S 80 



116 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1951 

Cash balance on hand 

Savings bank deposits: 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings : 

Warren Institution for Savings 

U.S.A. bonds at cost (see note): 

$25,000 Series "F" due September 1, 1955 

1,000 Series "F" due November 1, 1956 

6,000 Series "F" due May 1, 1957 

700 Series "F" due October 1, 1957 

1,200 Series "F" due December 1, 1958 

9,000 Series "F" due June 1, 1959 

1,000 Series "F" due October 1, 1959 

1,375 Series "F" due December 1, 1962 

26,500 Series "G" 2 l / 2 % due October 1, 1954. 

11,000 Series "G" 2Y 2 % due September 1, 1956 

$2,000 Southern Pacific R. R. 2%% due 1961, Equip. Trust 

Series "Q" 

2,000 Great Northern Rwy. Equip. Trust "M" due 1960, 

2 7 A% 

2,000 Southern California Edison 3% due 1965 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Equip. Trust "CC" 3% due 

1961 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 2%% due 1975 



Note: Redemption value of U.S.A. Series "F" and "G" 
bonds at December 3, 1951, exceeded cost by 
$3,462.05. 



80 



2,570 77 


5,350 11 


2,170 78 


18,500 00 


740 00 


4,440 00 


518 00 


888 00 


6,660 00 


740 00 


1,017 50 


26,500 00 


11,000 00 


1,913 27 


2,003 87 


2,039 30 


997 86 


952 91 


$89,003 17 



Lincoln Library Trust Funds 

Cash Account 
Cash balance at January 1, 1951 

Income received in 1951: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund $17 20 

Codman Fund 1 1 87 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 3 96 

John H. Pierce Fund 27 88 

George Russell Fund 10 44 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 48 39 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 32 52 

George G. Tarbell Fund 78 48 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 31 07 

Hattie Hoar Howard Fund 83 



$762 43 



COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS 

David W. Mann Fund 73 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 58 

General Library Funds 4 82 

Additional gifts to Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 



Deduct: Income from John H. Pierce Fund 
paid to Edith B. Farrar, Librar- 
ian 

Book-of-the-Month Club 

Work on Library grounds (from 

David W. Mann Fund) 

Safe deposit box rental 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 

Deposited in Middlesex Institu- 
tion for Savings: 

Hattie Hoar Howard Fund. . 

David W. Mann Fund 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr 
Fund 

Cash balance on hand at December 31, 1951 



$27 88 


25 00 


17 54 


4 00 



89 59 



117 

268 77 
6 00 



$1,037 20 



100 00 
88 16 

70 00 


, 422 


17 






$615 


03 









Cash and Securities at December 31 , 1951 



Julia S. Bemis Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Codman Fund: 
U.S.A. Series"G" 23^% due June 1, 1955 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund : 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Hattie Hoar Howard Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for Savings. 

David W. Mann Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 



Accumulated 

Income 
on Deposit 



$17 20 



58 



1 87 



83 



7} 



Principal 
$684 05 

70 00 

400 00 
74 59 

474 59 
158 89 

100 00 

88 16 



118 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



John H. Pierce Fund : 

U.S.A. Series "G" 23^% due January 1, 

1955 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

George Russell Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund: 

U. S. A. Series "G" 2Y 2 % due January 1, 
1955 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

George G. Tarbell Fund: 

U.S.A. Series "G" 2Y 2 % due January 1, 
1955 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for Savings 

General Library Funds, on deposit: 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

Accumulated income from prior years, cash 
on hand 



$10 44 



23 39 



3 48 



31 07 



$89 59 



615 03 



$704 62 



$1,000 00 
114 57 


$1,114 57 


415 74 


1,000 00 
930 00 


$1,930 00 


1,301 03 


3,000 00 
138 38 


$3,138 38 


1,235 46 


$10,710 87 


203 00 


$10,913 87 



Donald Gordon Recreation Fund 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1951 

Income received in 1951: 

U.S.A. Series "G" bond interest $75 00 

Savings bank interest 

Withdrawal from Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Deduct: Accrued interest on bonds pur- 
chased June 17 celebration .... 

23rd Infantry Band of Concord, 
band stand, electrician, etc. . . . 

Prizes awarded, Fourth of July 
celebration 



None 



44 83 


119 83 


avings 


1,210 00 




$1,329 83 


$ 92 




206 50 




25 00 





COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS 119 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate $44 83 

Cost of $1,000 Baltimore & Ohio 
R. R. Equip. Trust 3's due 
September 1, 1961 997 86 $1,275 11 



Cash balance on hand at December 31, 1951 $54 72 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1951 

Cash on hand 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Bonds at cost: 
$3,000 U.S.A. Series"G" 2Y 2 % due January 1, 1954. . . . 
1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Equip. Trust 3's due 
September 1 , 1961 



Income accumulated to December 31, 1951 
Principal 



$54 72 


1,218 64 


3,000 00 


997 86 



$5,271 22 



Income accumulated to December 31, 1951 $76 47 

Principal 5,194 75 



$5,271 22 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund for the Silent Poor 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1951 $15 00 

Income received in 1951: 

U.S.A. Series "G" bond interest $30 00 

Savings bank interest 41 26 71 26 



Deduct: Savings bank interest allowed to 
accumulate 

Cash balance at December 31, 1951 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1951 

Cash on hand 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

$1,200 U.S.A. Series"G"2H% due January 1,1955, at cost 



$86 26 
41 26 


$45 00 


$45 00 
1,682 03 
1,200 00 


$2,927 03 


$1,701 98 

1,225 05 


$2,927 03 



120 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Grammar School Fund 

Cash Account 
1951 Savings bank interest, paid to General Funds of Town 

Savings Bank Deposits at December Ji, 1951 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Cambridge Savings Bank 



$29 63 



$722 00 
495 52 



$1,217 52 



John H. Pierce Legacy 

Cash Account 
Cash balance at January 1, 1951 

Add: Income received in 1951: 

U.S.A. bond interest $337 50 

Other bond interest 45 00 

Savings bank interest 204 10 

Annuity u/w John H. Pierce. . 3,000 00 

Rent of property for 1951 600 00 

Fees collected: 

Well-Child Clinic 22 00 

Dental Clinic 559 00 

Refunds of hospital aid granted 285 65 

Withdrawn from savings banks: 

Wakefield Savings Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Sav- 
ings 

Proceeds of fire insurance on barn 



Deduct: Payments per order of Selectmen; 

Hospital aid 

Laboratory fees and medicines. 

Doctors' bills 

Well-Child Clinic 

Dental Clinic 

Nursing care 

Care of Pierce Park grounds . . 



$1,591 33 



5,053 25 





1,000 00 




1,134 27 




5,000 00 




$13,778 85 


$4,004 02 




290 17 




737 50 




439 88 




1,505 62 




312 00 




387 38 




$7,676 57 





COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS 



121 



Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 138 37 

Accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 4 07 

Bonds purchased: 

$2,000 St. Louis San Francisco 
Rwy. Equip. Trust Series 
"I"2%%due August 1, 1955 2,005 57 

2,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. 
Equip. Trust Series "CC" 
3% due September 1, 1961. . 1,995 72 

Cash balance at December 31, 1951 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1951 
Cash on hand 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

Wakefield Savings Bank 

U.S.A. bonds, at cost (see note) : 

$11,000 Series "G" 2Y 2 % due September 1, 1956 

2,500 Series "G" 2Y 2 % due November 1, 1959 

8,500 Series "F" due April 1, 1958 

2,000 Series "F" due May 1, 1960 

2,700 Series "F" due December 1, 1960 

3,500 Series "F" due July 1, 1962 

$2,000 Southern Pacific R. R. Equip. Trust "Q" 2%% due 

October 1, 1954 

2,000 St. Louis San Francisco Rwy. Equip. Trust" I" 2%% 

due August 1, 1955 

2,000 Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Equip. Trust "CC" 3% due 
September 1 , 1961 



11,820 30 



$1,958 55 


$1,958 55 


4,175 58 
1,159 27 
1,876 67 


11,000 00 
2,500 00 
6,290 00 
1,480 00 
1,998 00 
2,590 00 


1,981 29 


2,005 57 


1,995 72 


$41,010 65 



Note: Redemption value of U.S.A. "G" and "F" bonds at 
December 31, 1951, exceeded cost by $140.00 



CLEMENT C. SAVVTELL, 
HENRY De C. WARD, 
LEONARD C. LARRABEE, 

Commissioners of Trust Funds. 



308 45 


713 


50 


85 


50 





Expended 


Balance 


$3,552 42 


$1,337 42d 


4,308 76 


720 04 


150 00 


150 OOd 


326 06 


17 61d 


744 66 


31 16d 


320 00 


234 50d 




53 00 
30 70 







122 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



deCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Funds Accounting 
1951 

Schedule A 

Activities for which Charges were made: 

Received 
School: Children $2,215 00 

Adult 5,028 80 

Play 

Film Society 

Concerts 

Lectures 

Rentals 

Other " 

d — deficit $966 95d 

Schedule B 

Other Expenditures for General Purposes: 

Restoration of Painting in Collection $375 00 

Equipment, Improvements 1,869 82 

Accessions 18 90 

Memberships, Subscriptions 87 00 

Salaries: Full time 15,061 43 

Part time 85 49 

Caretaker's Cottage 575 20 

Director and Office Costs 1,525 10 

Supplies and Maintenance. 1,425 73 

Electricity, Telephone, Water 2,587 99 

Fuel . 1,257 49 

Financial, Insurance ' 2,598 81 

Indoor Activities 1,815 22 

Outdoor Activities 337 15 

Supplies for Resale to Students 239 45 

$29,859 78 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 123 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 



During the month of August, Chapter 90 maintenance work 
was done on South Great Road, Codman Road and Concord 
Road. This work consists of oiling and resurfacing the roads 
also the installation of catch basins and waterways. 

The next three months were spent on Chapter 90 construc- 
tion work on Bedford Road. The work on Bedford Road con- 
sists of rebuilding and grading of the new roadbed, also the 
installation of two catch basins and culverts. If sufficient 
money is appropriated this project will be completed in the 
spring of 1952. 

The month of December was spent in the erecting of snow 
fences, also plowing and sanding the streets. The repairs and 
maintenance of the Town equipment was completed in 
December. 

A salt spreader was purchased by the Highway Department 
late in December. It is expected that this will help greatly to 
relieve the icy condition of the roads. 

Consideration is being given to the purchase of an automatic 
sand spreader similar to those used by the state. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLIFFORD BRADLEY, 

A ding Supt. 



124 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



The Board organized with Henry Warner as Secretary and 
Sumner Smith as Chairman. Twenty-five meetings were held 
during the year. 

Summary of Well Site Exploration 

The Town, through the last decade, at the request of the 
Water Board and the recommendation of the State Board of 
Health, has appropriated Water Works' money and directed 
the Board to make. a broad survey to increase the Town's 
water supply. 

The Board has retained Geologists, Engineers, and Seismolo- 
gists, and has had many helpful conferences with members of 
the State Water and Health Department. Reports and recom- 
mendations from the aforementioned sources have been fol- 
lowed, resulting in the Board, with the approval of the Finance 
Committee, presenting motions at the Town Meeting last June 
to appropriate money for a well site, equip the well and connect 
it to the pipe system. This is the only even passable well site 
discovered in the Town, located on land of Dr. Robert L. and 
Mr. James DeNormandie, and situated on the easterly shore of 
Fairhaven Bay about 900' north of Route 117. The ability of 
the well to produce 1,000,000 GPD is unquestioned, but 
whether the water would be sufficiently free from minerals 
after extended drawage during a dry period is not guaranteed. 
A more exacting pump test may be tried on this well. Another 
disadvantage to this site is that it is very expensively located 
as to accessibility and distance from the pipe system. The 
State Health Department recommends that for sanitary pro- 
tection the Town acquire the control of the property within 
circumference of a 400' radius from the well, but the land- 
owners prefer not to sell. 

Although the Town voted adversely on these motions, the 
Board feels that it would have been derelict in its duty if it had 
not so brought the subject before the Town. In the first place 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 125 

it stimulated for the first time great personal interest in the 
Water Works System and its problems, and it made the Town 
conscious that some time in the future, not too distant, it ap- 
peared that about $250,000 would have to be raised to increase 
the water supply. It further caused The League of Women 
Voters to commence an Educational Program on the Water 
Works, which has resulted in Messrs. Charles H. Blake, 
Ernest P. Neumann, Edward S. Taylor, Charles P. Kindle- 
berger and Frederick B. Taylor acting gratuitously as consul- 
tants with the Water Board. The Board is most appreciative 
for the interest and helpful cooperation given by these men. 

The Board would like to explore an area east of Lake Walden 
seismographically on the bare chance that a better located well 
might be indicated. 

Another possible source of more water might be the Hobbs 
Brook Reservoir from which the City of Cambridge has offered 
to sell Lincoln water. A gate house with a screened well, 
pumping station, possible filter plant and 16" main to Lincoln 
Center might be found to be the best solution, after a thorough 
examination and comparison with other sources. 

Meters 

Considering the current water supply situation, both as to 
supply and distribution, the Board believes the Town is recon- 
ciled on entering the meter system and intends equipping every 
additional water taker with a meter, and installing meters on 
existing services as fast as delivery and money allows. The 
meters will be read in order to arrive at a charge which will 
carry the annual Water Works budget, but customers will not 
be charged by meter until a consistent tax program can be 
followed. 

Clean and Line Main Pipes 

In order to pump more water from the pond without adding 
a new main to the reservoir, it is possible to clean the twelve- 
inch main and cement line it. A standby temporary pipe 
could be substituted in sections while the work is being done on 



126 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

the main, but the Board has not yet enough confidence in the 
successful completion of the project to recommend it at this 
time. Something might happen in the progress of the work 
to deprive any or all of the Town of water, and the water 
might carry some tasty influence from the cement lining for 
some time. 

The Board is aware that the distribution system is not 
wholly adequate in certain sections because of undersize or 
partially-filled mains, but is postponing renewal of these pipes 
as long as reasonable because there are so many more required 
and necessary expenses against Water Works income. The 
Board is reluctant to borrow money except for capital expenses. 

The Board estimates and recommends the following budget 
for 1952: 

Power $3,000 00 

Salaries 4,625 00 

Census . 100 00 

Maintenance and Repairs 7,000 00 

Labor .,.". 5,000 00 

Testing and Treating Sandy Pond 300 00 

Meters and Labor 6,000 00 

1 Ton Jeep Truck 2,754 00 

Legal 3,000 00 

Surveying Pipe System for Wells 1,000 00 

Total $32,799 00 



Statistics 

1. Pipe now in use, 29.254 mi. 

2. Number of hydrants now in use, 211. 

3. Number of stop-gates now in use, 270. 

4. Number of blow-offs now in use, 27. 

5. Range of pressure on mains, 40-100 lbs. 

6. Total gallons pumped, 130,568,900. 

7. Number of services added, 24. 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 127 

8. Number of services renewed, 23. 

9. Number of services now in use, 659. 

10. Number of meters now in use, 8. 

11. Pipe added, 340'. 

(8" Transite on Page Rd.) 

12. Pipe renewed, 1,943'. 

(8" Transite on Page Rd.) 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY WARNER, Secretary, 
ROBERT W. SCOTT, 
SUMNER SMITH, Chairman. 



128 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



On March 28, 1951, the initial meeting was held and the 
Board organized for the ensuing year. Mrs. Nancy Hurd was 
elected Secretary. Mr. Flint, member of the Nursing Com- 
mittee, and Dr. Donaldson, Chairman. Mrs. Ober was ap- 
pointed agent, and Mr. William Davis, burial agent; Mr. 
Andrew Doherty, inspector of animals, and Dr. Alden Russell, 
inspector of slaughtering. 

During the year the following licenses were granted: over- 
night camps, 1 ; slaughtering of poultry, 1 ; piggeries, 4; conva- 
lescent homes, 1 ; homes for the aged, 2 ; sale' of alcohol, 6. 

In accord with the State Law the following contagious 
diseases have been reported by physicians to the Board; Scar- 
let Fever, 3 ; Measles, 10 ; Mumps, 5 ; Chicken Pox, 3 : Whooping 
Cough, 1; Ring Worm, 3. In these days of sulfa drugs and 
antibiotics it is still of the utmost importance that the diagno- 
sis of contagious diseases be confirmed by a physician and be 
reported immediately by him to the Board. Complications 
beyond the power of antibiotics to correct still do exist. Five 
dog bites were reported. Here again, effective public protec- 
tion depends on early reporting by the victim, his physician 
or the dog owner. A verbal report should be supplemented 
by one in writing. The Town inspector of animals is then dis- 
patched and the dog is impounded at home for a period of two 
weeks. In no case should the animal be killed. If rabies is 
present, at the end of two weeks symptoms will have become 
evident in the dog, and proper steps can be taken for the care 
of the bitten. Otherwise, the dog is released only after an 
examination by the inspector of animals. 

A total of 400 dogs were licensed by the Town Clerk through- 
out the year, and on May 5, 1951, 153 dogs were inoculated 
against rabies at the Dog Clinic held at the Town Barn. The 
discrepancy in these figures is partly accounted for by the fact 
that many dogs are privately inoculated by veterinarians be- 
fore the clinic is held in May. Some dogs, however, do roam 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 129 

about town uninoculated to the danger of the public at large, 
and the great risk of the owner. It would seem more logical 
that a dog should be inoculated against rabies before a town 
license is granted. The reverse is true. A combined licensing 
and inoculation clinic is again planned for May, 1952, and 
due notice will be sent well in advance to each dog owner 
in town. 

Under the able direction of Dr. John Davies, 12 Well Child 
Clinic conferences were held during the year. Each year the 
attendance increases, and this year 105 cases presented them- 
selves. Twenty-seven were under one year of age, and a total 
of 78 represented pre-school age children. In addition to ex- 
amination, the usual inoculations, booster shots, and smallpox 
vaccinations were given. We feel that the Well Child Clinic 
is a very important factor in our Town health program, as it 
attempts primarily to forestall disease, and so eliminate expen- 
sive treatment. Certainly in children an ounce of prevention 
is worth many pounds of cure. 

The Dental Clinic is also an active agent in the Town health 
program. Dr. Harold L. Ehrlich came to us last year with a 
background of training of 6 years at the Harvard Dental School 
and the highest recommendations as to character and profi- 
ciency. He has taken an interest in the Town dental problems 
and to date has examined 357 children. Only 74 of these, or 
21% were found to have teeth in excellent condition. At 
present, 63 with defects have been completely corrected, and 
have developed new defects, and in 33, caries were found ram- 
pant. In 5 pupils, due to inertia and failure of cooperation at 
home, no corrections have been carried out. Again it should 
be stated that the clinic is open to all school children. The 
initial examination or diagnostic preview of a child's dental 
state is free of charge, thanks to the generosity of a Town bene- 
factor. Then treatment of disease is done at a reasonable 
charge, only on permission of the family, after the latter has 
been appraised of the situation by written note from the clinic. 
Where the financial burden is heavy, we are again fortunate in 
being able to call on a limited charitable fund. The Board of 
Public Welfare has the final decision on any given case. The 
Dental clinic is not a free treatment clinic and was never 



130 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

meant to be, and we believe carries higher standards than the 
free, tax-supported clinics. 

The Board has spent some time investigating the safety and 
practicality of adding fluorine to the Town water supply. In 
concentrations of 1 part per million fluorine in water reduces 
childhood tooth decay by 65%, and 20% of children raised in 
this environment are free of caries. It is now established the 
fluorine is safe, and fluorination of Town water supply is recom- 
mended by the State Department of Public Health, Massa- 
chusetts Medical and Dental Societies, and many others. The 
running cost is trivial. Installation, proper control, possible 
side effects, etc., are some of the problems which must be 
solved. 

The Board has continued its active interest in the Union 
Health program, and various members have attended meetings 
with the committee appointed by the Moderator to investigate 
the matter. Acton, Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, Lexington, 
Lincoln, Maynard, Sudbury, and Way land are proposed for 
union. By State Law, unionization becomes obligatory by 
August of 1959. We feel the benefits from such group action, 
supervised by a single office trained in Public Health matters, 
would be numerous. Health problems in Lincoln are different 
from those of 10 or 20 years ago; and with a growing popula- 
tion and the changing problems posed by daily discoveries in 
the field of medicine and public health, expert help becomes of 
increasing importance. The present Town Board of Health 
would remain intact but would have the benefit of advice and 
counsel from an outside source and would be rewarded by group 
action on health problems common to the entire area of 
Union. Many details remain to be worked out. The quality 
of Town health protection would be improved without ques- 
tion. Integrating our problem with those of other towns, es- 
tablishing basic services with them, and figuring the relative 
cost per capita of this move are some of the matters under dis- 
cussion at present. 

For the past 18 years these reports have been written by one 
who has been completely devoted to the job of keeping the 
health standards of Lincoln high. He has been a veritable 
Vigilante on some of the problems which have been peculiar to 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 131 

this Town. Townspeople have called on him freely for help, 
and he has been ever willing to devote time and energy 
to Town matters which have taken him far afield — farther 
than most of us have realized. The present Board feel 
fortunate in still being able to call in consultation Dr. Robert 
L. DeNormandie. 

NANCY HURD, 

WARREN FLINT, 

GORDON DONALDSON, M.D., 

Chairman of the Board, 



132 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



During the past year the Cemetery Commissioners have 
continued to bring up-to-date the past Cemetery records. 

Records for the sale of lots and their ownership have been 
completed. You now have a complete record of all lots sold 
with deeds issued and corrections made, as far as possible. 
This record, if continued, should assure the Town of payment 
for lots sold and also give to the purchaser a deed upon payment 
for the same. 

The Town Clerk now has a bookkeeping system established, 
and while not complete in all past records, should assure the 
townspeople of accurate future recordings. 

The Commissioners are indebted for this information to the 
concern and interest of Mr. George Cunningham and we only 
regret that the lack of informed interest on the part of the 
Selectmen prevented us from completing an extremely import- 
ant phase of the work, namely the location and the recording 
of past burials, many of which are unmarked. 

Additional stone markers have been ordered for more of the 
Cemetery lots. Also surveying has been done in parts of the 
cemetery and maps will be made so that correct numbers will 
be given to lots already sold. 

The next important need in your cemetery is the improve- 
ment of the roads and the drainage of water from the low spots, 
where it now collects, into the brook which in turn must be 
opened so that the water will be carried away from the ceme- 
tery. For this the Finance Board wishes a complete report on 
the entire cost of all drainage problems and all road repairs 
then consideration for an appropriation, from the Cemetery 
Investment Fund sufficient to complete a portion of this work 
yearly, will be in order. 

Records for 1951 

Received from the sale of lots $1,595 00 

Cemetery Investment Fund, Dec. 31, 1951 .... 6,615 99 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 133 



Burials 

1951 Margaret M. Corrigan 

1951 Fritz Cunnert 

1951 Madeline A. Rice 

1951 Sanford Saylor Winchell 

1951 Anthony J. Doherty 

1951 Thomas F. Coan 

1951 Charles O. Preble 

1951 Hobart Oakes Davidson 

1951 George Marshall Crawford 

1951 William Bolio 

1951 Margaret L. Lahnstein 

1951 John Hugh Rogers 



Budget 1952 

To be raised by taxation : 

Salary of Superintendent $150 00 

Maintenance 1,800 00 

Water Rates 17 00 

Equipment and repairs 100 00 

Grading of lots and interments 600 00 

$2,667 00 

Repair of vault 75 00 



Feb. 


24, 


Mar. 


3, 


Mar. 


3, 


May 


5, 


May 


18, 


Sept. 


1, 


Oct. 


2, 


Oct. 


18, 


Oct. 


22, 


Nov. 


20, 


Nov. 


20, 


Nov. 


23, 



$2,742 00 
Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH H. DOHERTY, 
GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



134 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 



During the past year the Department responded to 46 alarms, 
representing a substantial decrease from alarms answered in 
1950. Total property damage for the past year amounted to 
$9,500. Listed below are the types : 

Brush 28 

Chimney 3 

Dump 5 

False Alarm 1 

House . . 2 

Miscellaneous 2 

Oil Burner 1 

Still Alarms 4 

As in previous years the Department continued with its 
fire drills, which we feel has added substantially to the effi- 
ciency of the Department. We intend to continue this prac- 
tice in the year ahead. It is the feeling of the Board of Engi- 
neers that the maintenance of safety, to a large degree, rests 
with the interest of the individual citizen to co-operate wher- 
ever possible to supplement the fire fighting force. This would 
be especially true in case of a major disaster, for there is no 
assurance that without this co-operation the Department would 
in any way be able to cope with such a problem. We strongly 
urge, wherever possible, that inexpensive but effective equip- 
ment such as a stirrup pump and an extra water pail be made 
part of the household safety equipment. Such equipment at 
hand during a disaster could substantially reduce damage by 
fire and effectively supplement the demand on the Fire De- 
partment. 

We have asked the Selectmen to recommend the Town pur- 
chase a resuscitator-inhalator. We have met with the medical 
members of the Civilian Defense and the Police Department, 
and it is the feeling of this group that such equipment should 
be purchased. Other than this, the engineers are not recom- 
mending additional outlay beyond the regular working budget. 



Lincoln Fire Alarm Code, 1952 

Telephone connecting both South and North Stations— 6-6195. 

12 North Great Road at Virginia Road 

13 Virginia Road at Old Bedford Road 

14 Virginia Road near McHugh's 

15 North Great Road near Cunnert's Mill 

16 North Great Road at Brooks Road 

17 North Great Road — Concord Line 

112 North Great Road at Mill Street 

113 Mill Street 

121 Old Bedford Road — Bedford Line 

123 Virginia Road — Concord Line 

21 North Lincoln Fire Station 

23 Cambridge Turnpike at Brooks Road 

24 Cambridge Turnpike — Concord Line 

212 Cambridge Turnpike at Lexington Road 

213 Cambridge Turnpike — Lexington Line 

214 Mill Street at Lexington Road 

215 Lexington Road at Farm Road 

216 Blueberry and Grasshopper Lane 

31 Bedford Road at miliar d Road 

32 Lincoln Center 
132 Town House 

34 Trapelo Road at Lexington Road 

35 Trapelo Road at Page Road 

36 Trapelo Road at Old County Road 

37 Page Road 

312 Sandy Pond Road at Baker Bridge Road 

313 Baker Bridge Road at Storrow House 

314 Woods End Road 

315 Baker Bridge Road at Concord Road 

316 Lake Walden Reservation — Concord Line 
321 Sandy Pond Road — Concord Line 

41 Lincoln Road at Macintosh Lane 
411 New Elementary School 

42 Lincoln Road at Tower Road 
422 Center School 

421 Beaver Pond Road 

43 Tower Road at Beaver Pond Road 
431 Tower Road at Calkins 

45 Silver Hill Road 

46 Weston Road at Conant Road 

47 Conant Road — Weston Line 

411 Old Winter Street 

412 Winter Street near J. Coan 

413 Winter Street — Walt ham Line 

511 South Lincoln Fire Station 

51 Lincoln Road at South Great Road 

52 South Great Road at B. & M. R.R. Crossing 

53 South Great Road at Tower Road 

54 South Great Road — Weston Line 
56 Weston Road — Weston Line 

58 Tower Road — Weston Line 

512 Codman Road at Lincoln Road 
521 Sudbury Road near Boyce's 

61 Lincoln Road — Wayland Line 

62 Concord Road — Wayland Line 

63 Oxbow Road — Wayland Line 

64 Concord Road at South Great Road 

65 Concord Road at Codman Road 

66 Hillside Road 

67 Baker Bridge 

68 Old Concord Road near C. F. Adams 
612 South Great Road — Concord Line 
1-1-1-1 Police Department 

1-1 Test Blow, Noon 

1-1 After an alarm, all out 

2 rounds of box number, Forest Fire 

3 rounds of box number, Building Fire 
No school signal at 7:30 3-3-3 

7:35 3-3-3 
5-5-5-5 Mutual aid 
7-7-7 Boy Scout Call 



AN ACT TO PROHIBIT THE DRIVING OF 

VEHICLES OVER MUNICIPAL FIRE HOSE 

1926, Chapter 278 

Section 7A. Upon the approach of any fire apparatus 
which is going to a fire or responding to an alarm, every person 
driving a vehicle on a way shall immediately drive said vehicle 
as far as possible toward the right-hand curb or side of said 
way and shall keep the same at a standstill until such fire 
apparatus has passed. No person shall drive a vehicle over a 
hose of a fire department without the consent of a member of 
such department. No person shall drive a vehicle within 
three hundred feet of any fire apparatus going to a fire or 
responding to an alarm, nor drive said vehicle or park or 
leave the same unattended within six hundred feet of a 
fire or within the fire-lines established thereat by the fire 
department. Violation of any provision of this section shall 
be punished by a fine of not more than twenty-five dollars. 
(Approved April 28, 1926.) 



CHAPTER 148 AS AMENDED TO 1949 
Section 54 

Whoever drops or throws from any vehicle while the same 
is upon a public or private way running along or near forest 
land, or, except as permitted by law, drops, throws, deposits 
or otherwise places in or upon forest land, any lighted ciga- 
rette, cigar, match, live ashes or other flaming or glowing 
substance, or any substance or thing which in and of itself is 
likely to cause a fire, shall be punished by a fine of not more 
than one hundred dollars or by imprisonment for not more 
than thirty days. 

A permit is required for all open fires. 

Investigate your chimneys and keep them clean. 

Traffic siren means pull out and stop. 

Oil burning equipment should be inspected and cleaned fre- 
quently. 

False alarms are punishable by fine or imprisonment. 

When calling by telephone for fire speak calmly and dis- 
tinctly, giving name, street and type of fire. This will insure 
more prompt response by the firemen. 

Do not allow rubbish, paper, or any inflammable material to 
accumulate in or about your property. 

Always call the Department before attempting to extinguish 
a fire yourself. 

The Fire Department will be enabled to render better 
service if these instructions are followed. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS 
C. K. Fitts, Clerk Edmund Giles, Chief A. J. Dougherty 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEERS 



135 



As outlined in last year's report, we have had further meet- 
ings with the Planning Board regarding puchase of land suit- 
able for the eventual building of a Fire Station ; and the Plan- 
ning Board is making certain recommendations in this direction 
at an early date. 

We feel that all residents of Lincoln should be introduced to 
the members of the Fire Department. Below is a list of^these 
men: 



0. C. Wood 
J. Tracey 
W. Doherty 

E. Murphy 

C. Bradley 
A. Brooks 
H. Lawson 

F. Campobasso 
J. Campobasso 

D. Spooner 
W. Dean 
F. Gordon 
C. Lahnstein 



E. MacLeod 
W. Porter 
R. Scott 
J. Frazier 

E. Teabo 
D. Todd 
R. Malloy 
R. Gormley 
J. Knowles 
J. Cotoni 

F. Gordon, Jr. 
W. Meriam 
C. Smith 



EDMUND GILES, Chief, 
C. K. FITTS, Clerk, 
A. J. DOUGHERTY, 

Board of Engineers. 



136 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE NURSING COMMITTEE 



951 


1950 


769 


1,889 


790 


1,119 


205 


32 


49 


38 


12 


26 


251 


238 


294 


206 


42 


41 


78 


60 


48 


24 


75 


$413 50 



The statistics which appear in the following table indicate 
that Mrs. Ober, our community nurse, has had another busy 
year. Attending the sick and making post-surgical calls, of 
course, take most of her time. Her other activities, however, 
are numerous and varied. 



Number of calls 1 , 

Medical 

Surgical 

Pre-natal 

Post-natal 

Well Child Clinic 

Child Welfare 

Social Welfare 

Board of Health 

Trips out of town 

Fees $445 

Mrs. Ober reports that the Well Child Clinic is as popular as 
ever. The same can be said for the Dental Clinic at the school 
where she spends a full day each week. In addition she has 
under her jurisdiction all other details of the school health pro- 
gram including the pre-school examination of all kindergarten 
children. 

During the summer the Water Safety Class was held at Lake 
Walden again under the supervision of the American Red Cross. 
Mrs. Ober registered all the children as usual and reported 
attendance very good. 

Besides making her regular calls and attending to the details 
of the clinics, Mrs. Ober attended several meetings at the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, the Massachusetts Memorial 
Hospital and the Middlesex Sanitorium where lectures and dis- 
cussions on advances in the field of medicine proved interesting 
and instructive. She likewise attended meetings in nearby 



REPORT OF NURSING COMMITTEE 137 

towns to talk over the pros and cons of the possible union of 
Boards of Health. 

As our Town grows, Mrs. Ober finds her time well filled; yet 
she is always ready and willing to help when called upon to 
do so. 

MALCOLM DONALDSON, Chairman, 
WARREN FLINT, 
ALBERTA FRADD, Secretary. 



138 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



The Trustees of the Lincoln Library report an increase in its 
use and service for 1951. This increase seems to have justified 
the present arrangement of opening three days of the week. 
The number of borrowers has increased by about 4% and the 
number of books loaned exceeded that of the previous year 
by 10%. 

Naturally this extension of library facilities means a moder- 
ate increase in costs. Employment of an assistant to the 
librarian, and more heat, light, and supplies were necessities 
under the new arrangement and will continue to be. 

Many friends have been generous in their gifts and services. 
A partial list follows this report. Especially we wish to ex- 
press our appreciation to Mr. David Mann for his interest and 
help in getting the Tower clock back into use. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, 
ALICE G. MERIAM, 
GEORGE G. TARBELL, 
JOHN O. WILSON, 
ROLAND C. MACKENZIE, 

Trustees. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN LIBRARY 139 



List of Donors to the Lincoln Library During 1951 



Mrs. L. B. Anderson 


Miss M. Jacobs 


Mrs. H. S. Bean 


Miss K. O'Sullivan 


Mrs. J. DeNormandie 


Dr. Harry Bigelow 


Mrs. R. L. DeNormandie 


Dr. E. B. Cole 


Mrs. R. K. Fairbanks 


Mr. Christopher Billings 


Mrs. H. Healey 


Mr. James Billings 


Mrs. S. Heck 


Mr. C. V. Briggs 


Mrs. W. King 


Mr. P. Brooks 


Mrs. R. Meriam 


Mr. R. Cory 


Mrs. J. P. Monks 


Mr. F. W. Denio 


Mrs. L. Monks 


Mr. N. Fradd 


Mrs. E. A. Murphy 


Mr. H. B. Hills 


Mrs. E. S. Taylor 


Mr. J. Hills 


Mrs. F. B. Taylor 


Mr. H. B. Kane 


Mrs. R. H. Thorson 


Mr. C. Kindleberger 


Mrs. H. Warner 


Mr. G. G. Tarbell 


Miss A. Campbell 


Concord Free Library 


Miss N. Carman 


Lincoln Garden Club 


Miss L. Foreman 


Lincoln League of Women Voters 



Library Statistics, 1951 

Number of borrowers, December 31, 1951 818 

Number of days open 128 

Amount of fines collected $222 00 

Number of volumes, January 1, 1951 15,685 

Number of volumes, added by gift 258 

Number of volumes purchased 374 

Number of volumes withdrawn 295 

Number of volumes, December 31, 1951 16,022 

Circulation Figures 

Fiction 5,683 

Non-Fiction 3,179 

Juvenile 7,079 

Periodicals 1 ,310 

Total 17,251 



140 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN PLANNING 
BOARD FOR 1951 



The Planning Board was organized for 1951 with William T. 
King, Chairman, and Alan McClennen, Clerk. 



Subdivisions 

During the year the following subdivisions were approved : 

Thomas T. and Stella A. Giles, April 14, 1951 — 8 lots off 
Concord Road 

Huntley and Riley, September 12, 1951 — 6 lots off Farrar 
Road 

Hanover Trust, Ernest Henderson, December 27, 1951 — 
4 lots off Baker Bridge Road (revision of earlier plat). 

Several other subdivisions were considered in preliminary 
stages. 

Zoning 

The Town adopted the proposed changes to the zoning by- 
laws and map, but the office of the Attorney-General has not 
yet given its approval. Attempts are being made through 
counsel to obtain action. 

Edison Power Line 

The question of the high tension power line planned by the 
Edison Company is not yet resolved. The Department of 
Public Utilities has recently approved an overhead line to run 
along the road bed of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
This order of the Department supersedes the original plan to 
go through our Town according to recent legal advice. Our 
efforts and those of neighboring towns are still devoted to hav- 
ing this line placed underground. 



REPORT OF PLANNING BOARD 141 



Northeastern Gas Transmission Co. 

The proposal and construction of the natural gas line by the 
Northeastern Gas Transmission Company absorbed much 
time on the part of the Board. While the Board disapproved 
of the project it came to the conclusion that: 

(1) No economic case could be established to force the Gas 
Line out of the Town. 

(2 ) No other route could be found in the Town that did not 
raise substantially the same objections as the chosen 
route. 

The Board wishes to point out that the high tension line, the 
gas lines and the cross state toll road were all planned to pass 
through Lincoln primarily because the Town constitutes the 
nearest open area to Metropolitan Boston on its western perim- 
eter. It is probable that in the future similar projects will 
arise. 

Bedford Airport 

With the Selectmen we have been in touch with the expan- 
sion plans at the Bedford Airport. Present plans, according to 
information we have reason to believe is reliable, call for the 
eventual employment of 2,000 civilians and 1,000 military 
personnel. Of the civilians 1,200 are already employed in 
similar activities in and about Cambridge, and a majority of 
these are already adequately housed at convenient distances 
from the airport. While we cannot ignore the fact that this 
will increase the pressure for development in Lincoln, it is 
questionable whether this will be as important as the growth 
we may expect from the future expansion of the Metropoli- 
tan Area. 

Fire Station Site 

The Board with the Fire Engineers and Selectmen have con- 
sidered the matter of acquiring a desirable site for the con- 
struction at some future date, of a fire station in the northern 
section of the Town. It is the opinion of this Board that the 



142 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



acquisition of land at the present time would be a most con- 
structive step provided it could be obtained at a reasonable 
cost. 

Zoning of Concord Turnpike 

The bill to restrict land abutting the Turnpike to residential 
use was defeated in the Legislature. A similar bill has been 
submitted for consideration in the current session. 



LINCOLN. MASS 
ROAD TAKINGS 



State Highways 

Taken Town Roads 

Untaken Town Roads 



SCALE .- FEET 




Layout of Town Roads 

The Board has continued to give consideration to the layout 
of Town roads in order to define the limits of Town jurisdiction. 
The present status of our roads is as follows (see map) : 

Laid out State Highways 6.5 mi. 

Laid out Local Roacfe 22 mi. 

Roads yet to be defined 19 mi. 



REPORT OF PLANNING BOARD 143 

There are at present about 4 miles of roads for which up-to- 
date surveys exist and for which layouts could be made read- 
ily. The Board wishes to emphasize that layout and taking 
does not mean that extensive reconstruction need or must be 
carried out. 

Recreation Areas 

The Planning Board believes that with the rapid growth of 
the Town the question of additional recreation areas, north of 
Route 2 and south of the railroad, should seriously be con- 
sidered. While the demand may not be great now it is possi- 
ble that by the time the Town is fully developed added facili- 
ties sites may be desirable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM T. KING, Chairman, 
ALAN McCLENNEN, Clerk, 
EVELETH R. TODD, 
HOWARD SNELLING, 
RICHARD W. EATON. 



144 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Board of Selectmen appointed Elliott V. Grabill to the 
Board for five years and Thomas B. Adams as an Associate 
Member for three years. 

The Board organized with Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman, and 
James DeNormandie, Clerk. 

The following cases were heard by the Board during the 
year. 

March 15, 1951. 

Permission granted to Christopher W. and Nancy D. Hurd 
to construct an addition to their property on Upland Field 
Road, under section 21 (d) of the zoning by-laws. 

March 28, 1951. 

Permission granted to James DeNormandie for temporary 
occupancy of a farm house on Codman Road by two families 
for a period of six months. 

April 11, 1951. 

Permission granted for one year only to Mildred Bowles to 
rent ponies on her property subject to the approval of the Board 
of Health and provided that ponies be restricted to her prop- 
erty and not to exceed three in number. 

Permission granted to Norman Brisson to use a building 
other than a dwelling as a nursery office, to continue a land- 
scape gardening business for one year only and to continue 
contracting business for one year only. 

June 28, 1951. 

Permission granted to Clayton R. Snow for a variance to 
construct an addition to his property on So. Great Road. 

August 6, 1951. 

Application of Dr. Arthur D. Baldwin for a variance of the 
zoning by-laws to permit the erection of a temporary camp on 
So. Great Road denied. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF APPEALS 145 

Permission granted to Merrill and Hope Hunt to continue 
the use of their house for two families for a period of one year 
under section 21 of the zoning by-laws. 

September 11, 1951. 

Permission granted to Allston and Marian Riley to con- 
struct a road on their property on Farrar Road. 

December 13, 1951. 

Application of Gertrude S. Eaton for permission to install a 
kitchenette in the ell of her property on Bedford Road was 
denied. 

Application of Robert W. Kinney to erect a temporary camp 
on his property on So. Great Road was denied. 

Permission granted to Edmund W. Giles to erect a dwelling 
on his property on South Great Road. 

Application of Hartwell Farm for approval of sign at the 
corner of Virginia and North Great Roads not acted on. 

Application of Stephanie Danosky for permission to place 
two signs advertising her business on Concord Road was 
denied. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL, Chairman, 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE, Clerk, 
D. EVERETT SHERMAN, JR., 
HENRY B. HOOVER, 
ANDREW J. O'REILLY, 

Board of Appeals. 



146 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



1951 LINCOLN TOWN REPORT 

OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE 



Middlesex County maintains an Extension Service in Agri- 
culture and Home Economics for the benefit of all towns 
within the County. This service is available to all citizens, 
especially farmers, home gardeners, homemakers, rural youth 
and 4-H Club boys and girls. 

The work is developed by an unpaid Board of Trustees, who 
maintain a staff of agents at the headquarters at 19 Everett 
Street, Concord. The trustees appoint a director in each town 
to represent them in all phases of Extension Work or in a few 
cases towns elect a director and make an appropriation to help 
defray local expenses. 

In addition to farm and home visits made upon request, 
local meetings are held, or sectional or county- wide meetings 
or tours are helps available to everyone. A monthly bulletin 
is published, timely letters mailed on spraying, fertilizing, 
seeding, poultry problems, information to homemakers, boys 
and girls' 4-H work or general community problems. 

Some of the activities that took place last year in Lincoln 
are as follows: 

Educational work with the dairy men was concentrated on 
programs to assist the farmers in solving their problems of rais- 
ing better roughage, disease control and milk marketing. A 
meeting of dairymen was held at the farm of James DeXor- 
mandie. Abraham Shick and Hans Van Leer were enrolled in 
the Green Pasture Program for dairymen. The program was 
completed and appropriate seals were awarded for the work 
done. 

Farm visits to vegetable growers were made upon request. 

Increased efficiency, flock health, greater breeding progress, 
and better marketing practices were the principal goals of the 
Extension Poultry Program. Efficient management practices 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE 147 

and equipment were among the topics discussed at meetings 
of the Middlesex County Poultry Association, held at the 
Acton Town Hall on the second Monday of the month. 
George U. Browning, Conant Road, is enrolled in the Middle- 
sex Flock Health Program, through which the Extension Serv- 
ice is attempting to help poultrymen and turkey growers to 
keep their flocks healthy. Rabbit breeders were given assis- 
tance through the Middlesex Commercial Rabbit Association, 
which meets monthly at the Extension Service "Schoolhouse" 
in Concord. 

Mrs. Myron Lidga and Mrs. Charles MacFarland are repre- 
sentatives on the Women's Advisory Council and were respon- 
sible for groups organized in Lincoln this year. A coat-mak- 
ing program was taught by a leader, and slip cover demonstra- 
tions were taught by the home agent. Lincoln homemakers 
also took advantage of suggestions for Christmas giving which 
are included in the Gift Kit. 

4-H activities in clothing, food, gardening, poultry, and live- 
stock were carried on with nineteen boys and girls. The clubs 
were under the leadership of Mrs. Medford Huntley, who was 
also the Chairman of the 4-H Town Committee, Mrs. Gladys 
McCallum, and Hans Van Leer who was assisted by Richard 
Brooks. Every girl in the Clothing Club received a Blue 
Ribbon at the local exhibit and again at the county-wide ex- 
hibit held on Girls' Day in Lexington. This is an unusual 
accomplishment. Robert Danosky was awarded a First- 
Prize Ribbon on his excellent garden. 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
Town Director. 



148 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



Work has been carried on the same as in previous years. 
Spraying was started the second week in May and a second 
spraying was done in August. 

Twelve elm trees were dead and had to be taken down. 
Samples from 10 trees were taken and sent for examination. 
The report came back that they were not diseased. 

The Moth Department is in need of a new truck and a 
sprayer in order to carry on the necessary work. 

Poison ivy control was carried on the same as in previous 
years with very good results. 

Respectfully submitted. 



JOHN W. GILBERT, 

Tree Warden. 



LINCOLN RECREATION COMMITTEE 149 

LINCOLN RECREATION COMMITTEE 



In an effort to consolidate the various interests, the Select- 
men dissolved the Summer Playground Committee and Tennis 
Committee. Members from each of these groups and others 
now form the Recreation Committee. The purpose of the 
newly organized group is to encourage, promote and supervise 
Town recreational activities. 

The summer playground under the able and enthusiastic 
direction of Mr. Edward Czarnowski had a very successful 
program. The playground was open from 9:30 to 11:30 and 
from 1 :30 to 4 :30 and each session was well attended. 

The girls' program was under the direction of Miss Mary 
Jane Samborski, and special mention should be made of the 
fine work produced in the Arts and Crafts classes. 

A varied program was conducted in individual and team 
sports. Some of the individual activities participated in were 
tumbling, tennis, croquet, horse-shoes, paddle tennis, badmin- 
ton and checkers. Tournaments were held throughout the 
summer for each of the above. For team sports basketball, 
baseball, softball, volleyball, Newcombe, kickball, dodgeball, 
and various forms of the above were played. Home and home 
baseball games were played with Weston and Concord while 
intra-playground teams engaged in the other team sports. 

Four trips were taken during the course of the summer; two 
to Major League baseball games, one to Whalom Park, and one 
to Provincetown. 

The season was closed with a field day at which time prizes 
were awarded to victors of tournaments and to winners of 
various events and contests held that day. 

Enthusiasm for adult tennis continues. Two tournaments, 
one in early summer and one in September, were greatly en- 
joyed by players and fans alike. 



150 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

It is our hope to meet with the School Committee to see if 
there are ways in which economies can be effected in recrea- 
tional facilities offered by the two groups in the future. 

ASTRID DONALDSON, 
SADIE SHERMAN, 
EDWARD ROONEY, 
ROBERT GRAY, 
DAVID TODD, 
WILLIAM DeFORD, 
JOHN GARRISON, 
ETHAN MURPHY, Chairman, 



REPORT OF DIVISION OF INSPECTORS 151 



REPORT OF DIVISION OF INSPECTORS 



Building permits issued : 

New dwellings 40 

Alterations 18 

Other buildings 17 

Fees collected $210 00 

Plumbing Inspector: 

Permits issued 62 

Fees collected $98 00 

Wiring Inspector: 

Fees collected $90 50 

Respectfully submitted, 

NILS P. SW ANSON, Building Inspector. 
MANNING MacRAE, Plumbing Inspector. 
WILLIAM M. DEAN, Wiring Inspector. 



152 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 



This Committee has now developed material for a complete 
new Building Code arrangement. Processing, involving ap- 
proval of and possible additions by the Massachusetts Board of 
Standards, is now taking place in order that this material may 
be presented to the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NORMAN F. BRISSON, 
ROBERT BYGRAVE, 
WILLIAM M. DEAN, 
MANNING W. MacRAE, 
HENRY B. HOOVER. 



REPORT OF MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 153 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



Memorial Day was observed with appropriate ceremonies 
at the three cemeteries and at the Memorial in front of the 
library. The exercises concluded with an address by the late 
Professor Waldo E. Palmer at The Town House. 

The committee extends its thanks to the Town Officials, 
Boy and Girl Scout organizations and townspeople for their 
co-operation in helping to pay fitting tribute to those who 
served their country in the causes of freedom and democracy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. DONLAN ROONEY, 

Chairman. 



154 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO STUDY 
UNION HEALTH DEPARTMENTS 



The Committee was directed at the last annual Town meet- 
ing to study the provisions of Chapter 662 of the Act of 1949 
relative to the organization of union health departments and 
determine the desirability of Lincoln joining with one or more 
of the following towns: Acton, Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, 
Lexington, Maynard, Sudbury and Way land or others to 
form a union health department. 

The Act requires all towns and cities of less than 35,000 pop- 
ulation to become members of health unions by 1959. 

During the year the committee has made some progress in 
studying the situation and in meeting with similar committees 
and representatives of Boards of Health of most of the towns 
mentioned to discuss ways in which such a department might 
be organized. 

Long before the 1949 Act required towns to set up joint 
boards, the Lincoln Board of Health at the initiative of Dr. 
DeNormandie met with the Lexington Board of Health to 
explore the possibilities of combined effort. 

The union department under the new law would have a full 
time director of health with sanitarians, nurses and a labora- 
tory technician, in order to be able to protect the public health 
of the district continuously with trained professional workers. 

The problems of organization of joint boards and problems 
of cost require longer study before a definite proposal for a 
health union of towns in this vicinity can be put into form for 
submission to the Town meetings. The process which is now 
going on, in which representatives of the towns meet together 
for discussion and careful consideration, should lead to a better 
understanding of the values to be gained from having a satis- 
factory department and the difficulties in setting it up which 
must be overcome. The committee believes that Lincoln 
should continue to participate in the study so that the citizens 



REPORT OF UNION HEALTH COMMITTEE 155 

may be informed about developments and so that at the most 
advantageous time definite plans may be brought to the atten- 
tion of the Town for consideration. We recommend that the 
committee be continued in existence for another year, the 
Moderator being empowered to make such changes in its 
membership as he may find necessary. 

RICHARD K. CONANT, 
JEAN M. MURPHY, 
BRADFORD CANNON, 
ELLIOTT R. HEDGE, 
HANCY D, HURD. 



156 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVISE 
THE TOWN BY-LAWS 



This Committee was appointed by the Moderator pursuant 
to the vote of the Town under Article 13 at the last annual 
Town Meeting. At its first meeting the Committee organized 
with Henry Warner, Chairman and F. W. Denio, Secretary; 
and a number of meetings were held during the year. 

The Committee was unanimous in feeling that it would be 
inadvisable to prepare any major changes or revisions in the 
Town's By-Laws until the Zoning Law changes which were 
voted by the Town at the last annual Town Meeting had been 
approved by the Attorney General of the Commonwealth. As 
of the date of preparing this report, this has not been done. 

However, the Committee expects to recommend one minor 
change, in order to conform to a new law enacted by the Legis- 
lature last year. This change may be presented at the 1952 
Town Meeting, and it is hoped to obtain approval by the 
Attorney General before then. The Committee feels that 
further consideration should be given to this subject, and rec- 
ommends that either it, or a new committee, be authorized to 
continue this work during the ensuing year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. W. DENIO, Secretary, 

SUMNER SMITH, 

HENRY WARNER, Chairman. 



BEMIS LECTURES 157 

BEMIS LECTURES 



During the last few years the Bemis Lecture Mailing List 
has been used more and more by Lincoln organizations. It 
seems to be the most complete list of households in the Town, 
but with the rapid growth of Lincoln it becomes increasingly 
difficult to keep it up to date. The problem is being relieved 
by making more typewritten copies of the list, placing one in 
the Lincoln Elementary School and one at the Lincoln Town 
House; while changes to the list are sent to the DeCordova- 
Dana Museum which uses the Bemis List as the basis of its 
Lincoln list. The master lists are at Dickie-Raymond, Inc., 
80 Broad St., Boston, in stencil form, and at the home of Mrs. 
E. R. Todd in card-file form. Two typewritten lists are on 
hand at the home of Mrs. Todd to be loaned when needed by 
an organization. If said organization wishes to pay for the 
faster method of stenciling notices, it can go to Dickie-Ray- 
mond, Inc., to have this done, first with the permission of one 
of the Bemis Trustees. The purposes of this rule are: 

1. To protect Town property. 

2. To prevent Town property from being used for com- 
mercial advertising. 

The Post Offices notify the Trustees of people who have left 
town, but as it is against the law for the U. S. Post Office to give 
information on addresses, reliance is placed on the School and 
other organizations to add new names from time to time. 

The report last year stressed the limitations on musical pro- 
grams due to the inadequacy of the piano. This condition 
still obtains, and it is hoped that the Town will find it possible 
to purchase a new piano, or exchange the present one for a good 
second-hand piano. 

The Trustees have been pleased at the attendance at lec- 
tures, and at the improvement in behavior of the children in 
the audience. They feel that the parents are cooperating, and 
hope they will continue to do so, and accompany their children 
at more lectures. 

MABEL H. TODD, Chairman, 
CHRISTOPHER W. HURD, 
LEONARD C. LARRABEE. 



158 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1951 



I herewith submit my report for the Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1951. Said report includes all 
arrests made within the Town of Lincoln during the past year. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 45 

Arrests by State Police 47 

Total number of arrests 92 

Males 86 

Females 6 

Crimes against the Person: 

Assault 3 

Crimes against Property: 

Breaking and Entering and Larceny 1 

Larceny 3 

Receiving stolen goods 1 

Using motor vehicle without authority 1 

Crimes against Public order, etc.: 

Delinquency 1 

Drunkeness 16 

Escapee 9 

Poultry, illicit transportation of and buying and 

selling 1 

Sodomy 2 

Turned over to other Police Departments 2 

Vagrants 1 

Violations, Motor Vehicle Law 51 

Violations Motor Vehicle Law reported to the Regis- 
trar of Motor Vehicles 17 



REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 159 

Motor Vehicle Accident Report: 

Accidents reported 73 

Occupants injured 39 

Pedestrians injured 3 

Fatal accidents 3 

Summonses served for other Police Departments. ... 62 

I wish to take this opportunity to express my thanks to the 
local telephone operators for their prompt and efficient hand- 
ling of our calls and their cooperation in contacting the Con- 
cord Police in order that we may be called by radio. I also 
want to extend my thanks to Chief Ryan and all the Concord 
Police Department for their fine cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEO J. ALGEO, 

Chief of Police. 



160 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 



Approximately 295 volunteers have been enrolled by the 
Agency since it was established late in 1950. With the excep- 
tion of the Traffic Division which could absorb about 60 more 
men or women volunteers, the organization is on a minimum 
basis to meet potential chaotic conditions following a serious 
metropolitan disaster. 

The sum of $3,399.98 has been expended in meeting the 
Agency's expenses at the lowest level commensurate with 
reasonable compliance to the numerous State and Federal di- 
rectives. Establishment of an emergency radio communica- 
tions network has about been completed and may prove to 
be the largest fiscal outlay — $1,353.49 — for which sum the 
Agency has one central fixed station and four portable, mobile 
two-way field stations as well as a portable public address unit. 
Other large sums could have been expended and still may 
prove advisable should Lincoln attempt to meet impending 
but, so far, unsettled State and Federal emergency defense 
plans. Other amounts expended include: (a) $344.38 for 
medical supply stockpiles stored at the two aid stations, i.e., 
at Farrington Memorial and Storrow House; (b) $473.58 for 
restoration and revision of the warning system inclusive of a 
portable warnings receiver tuned to the State Police emer- 
gency net; (c) $1,049.25 spent to equip, maintain and operate 
the control center and headquarters. This latter sum includes 
minor remodelling at the Town Hall, telephone rentals for 
two emergency switchboards, supplies, postage and paper — 
no small item — and clerical help. Office hours for routine 
work have been kept two days a week on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day afternoons. 

It is impossible to forsee the termination of the Agency's 
work, or, for that matter, when it may be forced into a sub- 
stantial expansion. So far there is a preliminary basis for 
meeting most emergency situations. Work in 1952 will round 
out the rough edges of organization problems with some 
operational efforts to integrate the work of personnel and 



REPORT OF CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 161 

equipment on an experimental scale. Further Blood Type 
series are being planned for the Medical Division. Volun- 
teers are still needed in that the Agency's present status is that 
of minimum operations which will have to be expanded greatly, 
and under stress in emergency times. 

The following is an outline of the several Divisions and, in 
the larger units, directive personnel responsible as of the close 
of the year. 

Headquarters and Control Center: R. H. Booth, Dir.; John 
Garrison, Dep. Dir.; D. P. Keily, Control Officer; Mrs. Howard 
Snelling, Chief Clerk. 

Medical Division: Dr. Kenneth Farnsworth, Dir.; Dr. L. A. 
Vance, Dep. Dir.; Louis Paddock, Exec. Ass't.; Mrs. Marian 
Ober, Chief Nurse. 

Police Division: Leo Algeo, Chief; Roland Robbins, Dir. 
Emer. Traffic; Henry Warner, Exec. Ass't. 

Fire Division: Edmund Giles, Chief; Charles Fitts, Exec. 
Ass't. . 

Rescue Services: H. B. Knowles, Jr., Chief. 

Communications Division: D. P. Keily, Dir.; Dr. S. F. Mar- 
tin, Dep. Dir. 

Transport Unit: Ruth Lyon, Dir.; Mrs. C. A. Bliss, Dep. 
Dir.; Anthony Campobasso, Chief Dispatcher. 

Monitor Division: W. M. Preston, Chief; Frederick Greene, 
Safety Officer. 

Civilian Aid Division: Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Newton, 
Co. -Dir.; Rev. Charles Styron, Dep. Dir.; Mr. and Mrs. John 
Carman, Dirs. Housing; Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Swift, Dirs. 
Food; Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lovejoy, Dirs. Clothing; C. H. 
Blake, Dir. of Registration; W. H. Davis, Recorder. 

Utilities: Sumner Smith, Dir.; Warren Rice, Fuel Coord. 

Advisers: D. Donaldson, Legal; F. W. Denio, Fiscal; R. H. 
Morris, Tech.; H. M. Henry, Power; L. B. Whittemore, Gas; 
W. H. Costello, Tel.; George Tarbell, H. Kane, and Board of 
Selectmen. 

ROBERT H. BOOTH, Director, 

Civil Defense A gency. 



162 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF LINCOLN SCHOOL BUILDING 
COMMITTEE 



Pursuant to Article 16 of the Town Meeting, March 5, 1951, 
the Moderator appointed a committee to study the further 
School Building needs of the town. After conferences with 
the School Committee, the present and near future needs of 
the school were established. Anderson & Beckwith, Archi- 
tects of the original school were retained to design the proposed 
addition. A report was then made to a Special Town Meeting 
on June 11, 1951, where the sum of $385,000 was voted to 
construct and equip an addition to the New School, to include 
six classrooms and a multi-purpose Assembly-Gymnasium. 
Bids were opened on October 11, 1951 and it was found that 
the lowest bidder had not conformed to the exact specifications, 
having filed a bid bond instead of a certified check as pre- 
scribed. After careful thought it was decided to ask for a 
declaratory judgment by a single Justice of the Superior Court 
as to whether the Town could waive the minor requirement 
on the specification and accept the lowest bid. After a fair 
and thoughtful hearing, the Court decided that the low bidder 
did not qualify. Therefore the second low bid of J. F. Rand 
and Son was accepted. Due to this unforseen situation start 
of construction was delayed about a month which together 
with poor weather slowed operations. However the Com- 
mittee is pleased with the cooperation it has had and expects 
the new building to be finished before the end of 1952. 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING, 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY, 
ROBERT M. KIMBALL, 
PEARSON HUNT, 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE 

SCHOOL YEAR 1951 




NEWTON 

GARDEN CITY PRINT, INC. 
1952 



164 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



ORGANIZATION Term 

Expires 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, Chairman 1953 

DR. KENNETH S. FARNSWORTH 1952 

(MRS.) LUCY BYGRAVE 1954 

MEETING: First Tuesday of each month, 8 p.m. at the New Elementary 
School. Li 6-0333. 

Superintendent of Schools 

ANDREW J. MANGES, Lincoln Rd., Li 6-0103J 
Office at New Elementary School, Li 6-0333 

Administrative Assistant 

LOUIS J. SAPIENZA, Everett, Ev 7-0563 
Office at Center School, Li 6-0462 

Secretary to Superintendent 
IRENE D. HAGENIAN, No. Great Rd., Li 6-0335M 

Clerk — Center School 

MADELEINE HOMOND, Weston, Mass. 
Office at Center School, Li 6-0462 

Office Hours 

School Days — 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
School Vacation — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

No- School Signals 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system : 
7:10 a.m. 3-3-3- repeated at 
7:15 a.m. 3-3-3 

Radio station announcements will be read between the period 7 and 7 :30 
a.m. On stormy mornings, when school opening is in doubt, tune in on 
two or more stations where possible since it is not always possible to get 
messages through to several stations in the brief time allotted us. Please 
refrain, too, from tying up local phone lines to school officials and bus opera- 
tors during the morning hour, 6:30-7:30. We try to contact all of the 
following when it is necessary to call ofF school: 

WBZ 1030K WHDH 850K 

WEEI 590K WNAC 1250K 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



165 



If an announcement reads "No school — ALL schools" it will mean that 
no buses will operate and high school pupils will govern themselves accord- 
ingly. 

During extremely stormy or cold weather, parents are urged to exercise 
their own judgment in sending the younger children. 



September 


1 




3-5 




8 


October 


12 




13 


November 


7 




11 




12 


9 


-15 


27 


-28 


December 


19 




29 


January 


1 


February 


20 


March 


2 


April 


17 




27 


May 


29 


June 


16 




17 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1952-1953 

Monday Labor Day 

Wednesday — Friday. Staff Organization and Workshop 

Monday New School Year Begins 

(Half days only for first three daj's in Grades I-III) 

Sunday Columbus Day 

Monday Columbus Day, Recess 

Friday Teachers' Visiting Day 

Tuesday Armistice Day, Recess 

Wednesday Annual Open House 

Sunday — Saturday. . . .American Education Week 
Thursday — Friday. .Thanksgiving, Recess 

Friday Christmas Vacation, Closing 

Monday School Resumes 

Thursday New Year's Day, Recess 

Friday Winter Vacation, Closing 

Monday School Resumes 

Friday Spring Vacation, Closing 

Monday School Resumes 

- Friday Memorial Day, Recess 

Tuesday Summer Vacation, Closing 

Wednesday Commencement 



Additional Calendar Data 

It is planned to continue the policy of returning Grade I children to their 
homes on each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will reverse on February 2, 
1953. 

Staff Meeting Half-Days will be the first Wednesday afternoon of each 
month except that no such half days occur in September, December and 
June. 



166 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Town of Lincoln: 

The year 1951 was a good year for the Lincoln Schools. The 
Committee is glad to report that things are running smoothly, 
much is being accomplished, and the morale of teachers and 
pupils is good. 

Of prime importance, of course, in carrying out any school 
program is the choice of teachers. Thanks to the vote of the 
Town a year ago, we have been able to adjust our salary sched- 
ule so as to attract more experienced teachers. As a result, 
the work being done is good. Furthermore, because the staff 
is apparently happy, we find broader cooperation and assign- 
ments being carried out with enthusiasm. Of considerable 
help in promoting this spirit was the completion of the initial 
phase of formulating courses of study. This long standing 
need is well on its way to realization largely due to the com- 
bined efforts of the Lincoln School Association and the entire 
staff throughout the 1950-51 school year. Much help was 
derived from a "curriculum committee" appointed by the 
superintendent to continue the work during the summer vaca- 
tion period. The new teachers especially have found this 
study helpful in formulating their class programs. 

In the early part of the year a great deal of effort on the part 
of the School Committee had to do with the problem of addi- 
tional classrooms. In this connection meetings were held with 
the Lincoln School Association, with Mr. John Marshall of the 
State School Building Assistance Commission, and later with 
our own School Building Committee. In one instance it was 
necessary to appear before the Committee on Appropriations 
at the State House to further our cause. Thanks to the co- 
operation of all we are glad to report that the addition to the 
school building is under way. It is hoped that we may be 
able to occupy it, in part at least, by next September. In the 
meantime the north basement room at the Center School, which 
was the old shop, has been renovated. This with the small 
library room on the second floor of the same building provided 
two additional rooms last fall. All classrooms were comfort- 
ably filled when school opened in September. Next fall, how- 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 167 

ever, the incoming kindergarten class will have 63 children 
according to the present count. 

During the year the School Committee attended meetings 
with the Committees of Wayland, Weston, and Sudbury to 
discuss prospects for a Regional High School. This is think- 
ing into the future, and all discussion was non-committal. 
Such meetings keep us posted, however, on current thinking 
about this problem as the bulge in school enrollment approaches 
the secondary school level. 

Members of the Committee, with the Superintendent, 
attended several meetings of the New England School Develop- 
ment Council, of which we are a member, and the Massachu- 
setts Area II School Committees. Discussions at these gather- 
ings of school administrators were helpful and stimulating. 
In some ways they were comforting, too, in that they showed 
almost all communities struggling with the same problems 
now confronting us here in Lincoln. 

As for the 1952 Budget, it is not surprising that the trend 
continues upward. We are glad to report, however, that the 
increase is not as great as that of last year. Two new items 
over which we have limited control, Instruction and Tuition, 
account for 84% of the Budget, increase. In 1952 there will 
be three additional teachers to carry out our program. As for 
Tuition, at Concord it has advanced moderately, at Weston 
considerably. 

In conclusion, may we stress that our program is a good one 
but not an extravagant one. Extra dollars are being spent for 
good teaching, the crux of any educational endeavor. Our 
salaries are not out of line, however, with those paid by the 
better schools in nearby towns. Additional facilities under 
construction at the present time place our school plant on a 
most favorable comparative basis with the new and improved 
school facilities of our neighbors. The School Budget is rela- 
tively large, necessarily but not unduly so. A sound school 
program is our first concern and this we are endeavoring to 
achieve with due adherence to prudent fiscal policies. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, Chairman, 
Lincoln School Committee. 



168 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



It is a pleasure to submit my fourth annual report for the 
Lincoln Public Schools, it being the sixty-first in the series of 
superintendents' annual reports. 

Personnel 

Several changes in teaching personnel during the past year 
were the result of resignations, revision and expansion of the 
school program. 

After the holidays, Mrs. Aldrich resigned to assume family 
responsibilities and for the same reason Mrs. Hathaway left at 
the close of the school year. In the former instance we were 
most fortunate, at that time of year, in securing the services of 
Mrs. Flagg, a teacher of many successful years of experience. 
Mrs. Hathaway 's grade three position was taken by Mrs. 
Robitaille. Miss Lyke left in March and we were again most 
fortunate in finding a very satisfactory replacement in Miss 
Zartarian. Later in the year, Mrs. Gunther, who was finish- 
ing out the year at a special job, left us when it became evident 
that there would be a reorganization in program that would no 
longer require her services. Miss Van Houten resigned during 
the summer when, after her marriage, her husband was trans- 
ferred to Connecticut. Mrs. Warren replaced her in the 
Kindergarten. Mrs. HefTron and Mrs. Harvey left, at the close 
of the school year, after their husbands had completed their 
graduate pursuits at Harvard. They were replaced by Mrs. 
D. Booth and Miss GaVel. Mrs. Kahn and Mr. Outten also 
left at the close of the school year on their decisions to make 
their training and experiences available to private schools. 
Their positions were taken by Mrs. Weaver and Mr. Johnson. 
Miss Wilson was appointed to a second grade when Miss John- 
son was given the assignment in teaching reading to the entire 
second grade. Mr. Berger was an addition to a constantly 
growing staff. 

This rounds out changes in personnel during the fiscal year 
1951, with one exception. Mr. Maher resigned as custodian 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 169 

at Center School to return to the Town Highway Department. 
We were fortunate, indeed, to find a young man of considerable 
energy and a citizen of the Town to assume these responsibili- 
ties at Center School, Mr. Anthony Ciraso. 

Enrollment 

The rapidly increasing enrollment is an old song bearing a 
certain degree of triteness but much truth. With the comple- 
tion of the additional classrooms and the combined auditorium- 
gymnasium (auditasium to coin a new term) the Town can 
take considerable pleasure in the prospect of having its school 
facilities designated as "adequate" for the next near decade. 

With no complicating formulae, and allowing a room or so at 
Center for indoor physical activities, enrollment predictions 
borne out by actual fact to date will readily disclose that the 
school population will be comfortably housed until the six 
hundred mark is reached. 

Even this will require some reorganizing of schedules since a 
school population of that size denotes a need for more than two 
sessions or sections of Kindergarten not to mention other large 
classes which must follow. Let us not forget that 1952 is the 
year of the "great migration," when over sixty children are 
expected to enroll in the Kindergarten. 

Enrollment figures by age, grade and sex are shown later on 
in this report. 

School Organization 

Several changes, effected during the year 1951, have tended 
to produce an harmonious environment at Center School. Not 
the least of these were the appointments of an administrative 
assistant and a clerk-receptionist to this building. Solidarity 
has improved from an organizational viewpoint and communi- 
cations, both within the schools and within the community, 
have improved tremendously. 

Early in the school year it was recognized that our Grade I 
children were likely to be somewhat handicapped in their basic 
reading program due to targe classes. It was midyear before 



170 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

an experienced primary teacher could be found and the grade 
further divided. The results did not appear too satisfactory. 

In the fall, it was sought to solve the problem of an unusually 
large Grade II and to improve the reading program at the same 
time. Consequently the grade was divided into two large 
homerooms. Departing from the usual plan, the teaching of 
reading was centered with one teacher and the homeroom 
teachers carried out the remainder of the usual grade work. 
While a teacher under these circumstances could not get to 
know the children individually as well as she would like, never- 
theless, greater emphasis on pupils' reading needs could be met 
with greater facility and greater intensity. This has proved 
true. Testing will not be done for some weeks, but it is the 
general consensus of opinion that the results will bear out our 
present contention that there has been decided improvement. 

In connection with the Grade II reading program, reading is 
getting emphasis in other areas. The dismissal of Grade I 
pupils twice weekly, has served the physical needs of the major- 
ity of those children. Also this plan has made it possible for 
Grade I teachers to give special attention, twice weekly, to 
those few who have need for special help due to absence or in- 
adequate readiness adjustment. 

At the various upper levels, particularly needy pupils are 
receiving remediation and development in basic reading skills 
and spelling. Reference to some of this work is made else- 
where in this report. Suffice it to say at this point that the 
program readily bears out the need referred to when a utility 
teacher was requested at Town Meeting two years ago. It is 
interesting to note that the remediation and guidance phases of 
the program are being emphasized. The use of the utility 
teacher as a substitute teacher has become highly minimized. 
It is hoped that the remediation needs may also diminish and 
the guidance and evaluative processes in this plan will receive 
due emphasis. 

Other aspects of the program are reported elsewhere by those 
specifically charged with their responsibilities. 

In order to carry on with the current program developed on 
existing policies it will be necessary to appoint three additional 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 171 

teachers in 1952. These have been provided for in the 1952 
Budget. 

Your schools are in a more enviable position generally than 
they have been in many years. Program offerings have been 
expanded, class size has been brought to acceptable standards, 
so-called extra curricular activities have been incorporated into 
the regular program. Hobbies, extensive after school sports 
and musical opportunities are merely indicative of the progress 
being made. Closer and more frequent parent-teacher-com- 
munity contacts are developing. There has been improve- 
ment in transportation services, maintenance is receiving the 
attention of long term planning, plans designed to improve the 
physical and mental health of the school population are unfold- 
ing and even the budget, accounting and record keeping proc- 
esses bear signs of improvements designed to make them more 
useful. Though these changes have been through a slow evo- 
lutionary process they are arriving at the stage of fruition and 
1952 should make them even more apparent. 

The achievements of the past year are the results of the com- 
bined efforts, over several years, of community assistance, indi- 
vidually and severally, the results of long and tedious hours by 
the staff, especially the efforts of the present staff, and those in 
whose hands is placed the responsibility of the local educa- 
tional program. 

I wish to thank friends of the school, teachers, custodians, 
bus operators, the school nurse and the office staff for the cheer- 
ful assumption of responsibilities assigned them. It is a pleas- 
ure also to express my appreciation to the members of the 
School Committee for their friendly help, guidance and co- 
operation throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANDREW J. MANGES, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



172 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Art 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The following report covers the art program for grades one 
through eight from March 15, 1951 to December 31, 1951. 

The objectives in this art program are basically the same for 
all grades, although the degree of importance is varied. 
Through various methods the following have been encouraged : 

1 . Expression — opportunities for self-expression to develop 
imagination and observation essential in enlarging and 
enriching educational horizons — - desire to look further 
into art materials. 

2. Proper use and care of tools. 

3. Sound critical judgment as common meeting ground in 
individual and group work. The individual is helped to 
understand, enjoy and appreciate materials, organization 
and meaning of his work and the work of others. 

4. Art in relation to the individual and society. 

Throughout the primary grades we have encouraged the 
children to express themselves freely. In order that freedom 
of expression can always be maintained, there are no rigid or 
mechanical rules. Individual help is given as the need arises, 
but again expression of their ideas and figuring out their own 
problems are brought out by thought provoking questions. 

We have attempted to stimulate the children to be as imagi- 
native as possible by various means. In individual work 
opportunity for self-expression was enhanced by recounting 
everyday incidents, reading stories or poems and listening to 
music. Murals and decorating the room for the holidays or 
seasons of the year were worthwhile projects for group partici- 
pation. Media, such as crayon, chalk, posterpaint, clay, con- 
struction paper and fingerpaint, were used to give each child 
experiences in working with different materials and opportuni- 
ties for releasing emotional reactions. 

In this area too, we encourage the beginning of constructive 
criticism through the evaluation of others' work, for as early as 
the second grade, some children become aware of realistic prob- 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 173 

lems and are apt to discourage a classmate by some remark 
such as, "That doesn't look like a horse." By emphasizing 
such factors as (1) are we making our story or design fit the 
paper, (2) are we using the right colors and values for our pic- 
ture, and (3) are we using and taking care of our materials 
properly, the children are forgetting petty remarks involv- 
ing realism. 

The problem of expression is relatively negligible in the 
primary grades, for the children are usually imaginative, free 
in their actions and find great delight in manipulating mater- 
ials. But in the fourth and fifth grades, as the children be- 
come more conscious and critical of their own and the efforts 
of others, expression becomes a bit more inhibited and individ- 
ual help is necessary. Keeping drawings large and filling the 
paper receive much emphasis at this level. We have en- 
couraged the free handling of art materials in order to help the 
child forget detail and concentrate on what he is trying to ex- 
press. Motivation is enhanced by using advanced materials 
such as pastel, frescole and watercolor. 

In the sixth grade concentration was centered on being more 
imaginative, more observant and working cooperatively as a 
group. I found group participation poor, for each individual 
is unable to see his work in relation to the whole. By introduc- 
ing such projects involving murals, panoramas and room deco- 
ration this situation has been offset partially. 

More emphasis was also made on the proper use of materials 
and factual knowledge. The desire for expression was en- 
couraged in addition to relating experiences and reading stories 
by the introduction of folding problems and working with 
melted crayon. 

The seventh graders have been concentrating their efforts in 
design in order to have an understanding of the importance of 
design in everyday living, to develop a sense of balance, har- 
mony, aesthetic values in design, to develop imagination in de- 
signing, to develop their powers of observation and to be more 
discriminating. Each pupil was encouraged to develop his 
imagination and sense of design through various problems with 
construction paper, three dimensional work, and the use of 
string. Mam of the projects \\ e have done have shown worth- 



174 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

while results in ridding the children of inhibitions bearing on 
their capacities for artistic expression. 

Opportunities for self-expression have also been provided, 
but usually such free choice of subject matter results in the 
students doing the same subject repeatedly. This is especially 
true in the upper grades. Activities in the eighth grade em- 
phasized color, composition and design involving murals, post- 
ers and drawings with watercolor, crayon, pencil, pastel and 
construction paper. Here the problem of being imaginative 
appears most acute and class instruction, of necessity, becomes 
increasingly individual. 

Lengthening the period for art instruction, at most grade 
levels this year, has been extremely advantageous to teacher 
and class. It is hoped that this plan of scheduling may be 
spread to include the entire art program next year. 

Among the numerous projects completed it must be noted 
that the ''stained-glass windows" project of the fifth grade has 
commanded the most attention and elicited the highest com- 
mendations from visitors, parents and passersby. Excellent 
work is being done at all levels, not all of which can be as well 
exhibited as the "stained-glass windows." This may be 
attested to by those who have seen the numerous classroom 
murals, paper sculpturing and autumn scenes and the story of 
Columbus painted on the vast glazed areas of the main foyer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Supervisor of Art. 

Remediation and Guidance 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The ultimate goal of a tests and measurements program is to 
provide the school with data sufficiently comprehensive and 
objective to give a picture of the strengths and weaknesses of 
the student body and thus guide the improvement of its pro- 
gram. To this end the California Progressive Achievement 
tests, which are designed to measure the extent of pupil mastery 
in the fundamentals, were administered to the total school pop- 
ulation during the last two weeks of May, 1951. For the most 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 175 

part the students' achievement harmonized with available 
measures of their abilities. Figures show that three-fifths of 
the student body attained a percentile rank above 70 and four- 
fifths of them scored above the 50 percentile or median rank. 
It is of interest also to note that only 23^% of the students fell 
below the 15 percentile mark whereas 17% achieved the 90 per- 
centile rank or higher. Approximately the same standard of 
achievement was shown in the social studies and science areas 
from tests given to grades VI-VIII. 

An adequate judgment concerning the reliability and validity 
of a measuring device in a particular area, can be formed by 
comparing the data accumulated from many tests. Therefore, 
it will be a part of the testing program to retest Grades III and 
VI, using other well standardized mental maturity tests, the 
Kuhlrrtan- Anderson and Otis Quick-Scoring, in order to have 
the best possible basis for predicting educational success. 

Those students, sixteen in all, whose test results showed they 
were not doing work commensurate with their capacity are 
being given remedial help in reading and spelling. They meet 
in three separate groups for one full period each day. Re- 
cently, another small group of five first graders has been formed 
which meets for an hour and a half each afternoon. 

During the fall, two groups, each comprised of fifteen pupils, 
met a half hour daily to do concentrated work in spelling. 
Tests given in December showed an average gain of 1.3 years 
per pupil for the thirteen weeks' work with these groups. 

It is recommended that the Progressive Tests which we are 
now using be supplemented in grades IV — VI with Gates Read- 
ing Tests and in grades VII and VIII with the Cooperative 
Reading Tests as our present battery is primarily diagnostic 
and does not give the speed of comprehension. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Remediation and Guidance Director. 



176 TOWN OF LINCOLN 



Music 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Our aim in the music department is to encourage every child 
to participate in a wide variety of worthwhile musical activities 
and to develop the skills necessary for such participation. 
Those who saw the performance of The Mikado in April wit- 
nessed some of the enthusiasm we are trying to generate. 
Every student in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades had a 
hand in its organization, and with a double cast and two per- 
formances over fifty children had singing roles. The assis- 
tance, too, of members of the faculty and the wholehearted 
contributions of members of the community were especially 
gratifying. This was truly a cooperative venture for the 
Town of Lincoln. Even as the final curtain was being drawn 
the children were laying plans for the next year's production. 
This they hope will employ the talents of even more people — 
students and parents. 

The May Festival this spring was more satisfying than the 
1950 Festival had been. On the ball field at the New School 
each class — kindergarten through the eighth grade — per- 
formed a favorite folk dance. Then parents and children, 
probably five hundred voices, joined in singing familiar folk 
songs. This was our first attempt at real community singing. 
Its success indicated the desirability of having many more 
school-town song-fests. What fun it is for the kindergarten 
child to realize that the songs he loves best his older brother and 
his parents are singing, too! 

There were many opportunities for individual classes to 
entertain their schoolmates and parents with a demonstration 
of the work they had been doing. One of the best was the 
fourth grade's outdoor performance of Robin Hood. The 
children enjoyed this and are already planning similar activi- 
ties for next year. 

Special programs for United Nations Day, Thanksgiving, 
and Christmas were natural developments of our regular work. 
These holidays offer great possibilities for special work in music, 
but we have always been handicapped by lack of adequate 
facilities. We hope that with the completion of the new audi- 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 177 

torium such class and school programs will become even more 
valuable. 

To develop musical skills and sensitivity in our music classes, 
the program for each grade was essentially built around the 
broad, interdependent areas of singing, rhythms, theory, and 
appreciation. Each class acquired a large repertoire of suit- 
able folk songs, some of which were familiar to all classes. 
This gave us a common ground for all-school sings. Material 
for rhythms and folk dances was taken from these songs or 
from good piano and recorded music. Aspects of musical 
theory and reading skills were considered in each class as the 
need arose. Through singing, performing, listening to others 
perform, and listening to carefully selected recordings we tried 
to develop desirable musical understanding. An effort was 
made whenever possible to correlate the work of each class. 
The eighth grade, for example, were interested in the types of 
people that made America. Our work in music and social 
studies developed into an unusual pageant for the Commence- 
ment program. 

October saw the beginning of a much needed instrumental 
program. Tonettes were introduced to the third grade. Pri- 
vate and group lessons in piano, violin, flute, clarinet, recorder, 
trumpet, trombone and drum were offered at reasonable cost 
to children in grades four through eight. The children pro- 
vided their own instruments, a few being loaned by the school 
and members of the community. In December 67% of the 
students in the upper grades were studying some instrument 
either at home or in the school program. We were surprised 
and very much pleased with the enthusiasm with which the 
Town greeted the new program. We are trying to encourage 
group and individual music-making in our homes and school, 
and we hope that 1952 will see a notable expansion of instru- 
mental music in Lincoln. The school should have its own 
band, or orchestra and smaller ensemble groups. It is planned 
that these will be organized in 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Supervisor of Music. 



178 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Physical Education and Sports 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Although confined in scope due to temporary limited facili- 
ties, a well rounded program of physical education activities 
was provided for the students of the Lincoln Public Schools. 
The program was based upon recognition of individual differ- 
ences, was wide in range and was adapted to meet the needs 
and interests of the students. The activities engaged in were 
based upon seasonal sports with equal use of facilities for boys 
and girls. Tennis, football, soccer, basketball, kickball, 
tumbling, softball, baseball, newcombe, badminton and volley- 
ball were just a few of the sports enjoyed by all. Each child 
had an opportunity to lead according to his merit and follow 
according to his willingness. It can honestly be stated that no 
child had "spectatoritis." 

The sixth grade boys and girls met for two forty-five minute 
periods each week. In this younger group the basic fundamen- 
tals of kickball, soccer, basketball, tumbling and softball were 
taught and opportunities to practice the same were carried 
over into our intra-mural program. Individual and team 
sports were played with emphasis placed upon courtesy, fair 
play and good sportsmanship as desirable outcomes. Tennis 
and golf were begun. They should have more attention dur- 
ing the coming year. 

The seventh and eighth grade boys met twice a week and 
participated in a varied program which included softball, foot- 
ball, basketball, tumbling, wrestling, boxing, dancing and base- 
ball. At this level a more thorough knowledge of the game, 
rules and strategy was taught. The development of intelligent 
leadership and wise followership among the players were desir- 
able outcomes. Our after-school sports program gave the 
boys a chance to practice the various skills acquired during the 
physical education program. 

The seventh and eighth grade girls met twice a week and 
engaged in a program which consisted of kickball, tennis, 
soccer, basketball, tumbling, dancing and softball. The basic 
skills were stressed with a lead up to a more complex activity. 
Opportunity was provided for all girls to play for the full en- 
joyment of the game. 

During the course of the year an after-school program and a 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 179 

lunch period sports program was conducted. In these intra- 
mural games, any child who wished to play had an opportunity 
to display his talents. Tournaments were formed for both 
boys and girls in kickball, soccer, football, pingpong, tennis 
and some quiet games. The theme of our program is, "Play 
for the sake of Play." 

Our intra-mural program was operated on a sound and co- 
operative basis. It wasn't our policy to stress a highly organ- 
ized competitive team but rather to provide an opportunity for 
those boys who possessed particular talents in baseball or 
basketball to develop them in interscholastic competition. 

Lincoln was entered in the Middlesex Basketball League. 
Through the splendid cooperation and effort of the other 
schools in the league the boys had an opportunity to practice 
and play the game. Upon entering high school it is hoped they 
will be on an equal footing with boys from other schools. 

The baseball team had the good fortune to win the Middle- 
sex League Baseball Championship. The group deserves com- 
mendation for their team spirit, fair play, cooperation and good 
sportsmanship which resulted in the designation "Cham- 
pions— 1951." 

It is distinctly advantageous "that the person in charge of the 
summer playground and school physical education and sports 
program is one and the same. This results in closer coopera- 
tion between the two committees, accessibility of materials, 
use of facilities, outlining of playground area, less duplication 
of materials, thereby less unnecessary expenditures. 

It is extremely difficult to conduct a physical education pro- 
gram without the proper facilities. This temporary obstacle 
will be overcome with the completion of the new gymnasium. 
It is recommended that: 

1 . Complete physical examinations be provided for every 
student in school. 

2 . Physical Education classes for grades one through eight. 

3. A full time teacher of girls physical education. 

4. A full time teacher of boys physical education. 

5. Correction class for those having structural defects. 

6. Smaller classes for more individual help. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Director of Physical Education and Sports. 



180 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Health 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I hereby submit my annual report of school nursing for the 
period ending December 31, 1951. 

Schools have been visited daily. Weighing and measuring 
done, at least, twice; scalps examined frequently. 

I assisted Dr. Randolph Piper with the physical examina- 
tions, having stripped-to-the- waist examinations in Kinder- 
garten, grades V and VII. All other grades receive a cursory 
examination, excepting when it is indicated a pupil should have 
a very thorough examination. Results were: 

Rheumatic heart . 1 

Congenital heart 2 

and minor defects — all reported to parents. 



Tuberculin Tests 
Tests are done in grades V and VII only. 

Vollmer (TB) tests done 58 

X-Rayed (Middlesex Sanitorium) 5 

All X-Rays negative. 

The entire faculty attended Middlesex Sanitorium and had 
chest X-Rays. 

Immunization 
All children, entering Kindergarten or new to first grade, are 
asked to attend our Well Child Conference, where he is ex- 
amined by Dr. John A. V. Davies, and may, if necessary, re- 
ceive inoculations and vaccination. 

Number of kindergarten children attending 51 

Number of children new to first grade 2 

Number of children receiving triple inoculation 

(Pertussin, Diptheria, Tetanus) . 33 

Number of children receiving booster inoculation 1 1 

Number of children vaccinated 13 

Injuries — Accidents 
I received, at the office, 22 pupils with minor injuries which 
were treated or advice given. We did have two playground 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 181 

accidents (after school). One fractured femur, taken to 
Emerson Hospital, X-Rayed and admitted. The other pupil 
was cared for by school nurse and school physician was called ; 
the patient was referred to the family physician. 

I took home, because of illness, 21 ; and made 76 home calls 
on absent pupils. 

Eyes and Ears 
During April and May I had the Massachusetts Vision 
Chart, also the Maico Audiometer, from the State Department 
of Public Health. The results were: 

Examined 359 

Defects (eyes) 11 

Defects corrected 5 

Defects (ears) 4 

Defects under treatment or oberration 2 

Communicable Diseases 
Among our pupils there has been : 

Scarlet fever 2 

Measles 5 

Chicken pox 3 

Mumps . . . 3 

Dental Clinic 

Pupils examined • 359 

Pupils with teeth in good condition 73 

Pupils with rampant caries 33 

Number of pupils attending clinic 78 

Number of pupils having no correction 5 

Dr. Harold Ehrlich held two clinics a week, Tuesday a.m. 
and Friday p.m. 

A very healthy school year has been enjoyed, working with 
you and all the teachers, for the constructive improvement, 
mentally and physically, of our pupils. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION N. OBER, R.N. 



182 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Lincoln Scholarship Fund Committee 

In May, 1951, the superintendent asked the undersigned 
persons if they would serve as the initial committee in adminis- 
tering the newly established Scholarship Fund. 

Their responsibility was (1) to determine policies governing 
the awarding of scholarships and (2) to award scholarships. 

It was decided by the Committee that (1) scholarships shall 
be available to any high school graduate, resident of Lincoln, 
desiring further education or training; (2) scholarships shall 
be awarded on an individual basis, taking into consideration 
financial need, citizenship and scholarship. 

The Scholarship Fund was set up originally with the pro- 
ceeds of the Gilbert and Sullivan production in 1950 which was 
put on by the Music Department of the Lincoln Schools. 
More money was added from the same source in 1951. In 
addition the Fund has received contributions from interested 
citizens and from the Lincoln Grange. 

In May, 1951, three applications for scholarships were re- 
ceived. Two were awarded: one to Elizabeth Dougherty of 
$100 and one to Barbara Cullen of $100. 

This Committee recommends that the Lincoln School Asso- 
ciation assumes the responsibility of the Scholarship Fund and 
that it appoint a revolving committee from its membership to 
administer the Fund. It also recommends that the Fund be 
supported by benefits and contributions from individuals and 
Town organizations. 

This Committee feels that there will be an increasing number 
of deserving applicants and that every effort should be made 
to establish a substantial and permanent Fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEX H. TAYLOR, Chairman, 
SARAH KINDLEBERGER, 
MAXINE CRIDER, 
SADIE SHERMAN, 
MARTHA DeNORMANDIE. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



183 



B. 



School Census 

Distribution of Minors 5 yrs. or over 

by Age and Sex and under 7 
October 1, 1951 

1. Boys 84 

2. Girls 71 

Total 155 
Distribution: Location 

1. In Public Day School 146 

2. Other 

3. In private schools 8 

4. Not enrolled in schools 1 

5. Special — Elementary 

155 



7 yrs. 
and under 16 



179 
190 

369 

229 

1 

49 

2 

1 

369 



Vocational School Enrollees 
October 1, 1951 

1. Brookline Evening Practical Arts 1 

2. Boston Technical High School 1 

3. Arthur A. Hansen Trade School 1 



Tuition Pupils Attending Secondary Schools 
Outside of Lincoln 

October 1, 1951 

School 9 10 11 12 Totals 

Concord.., 17 16 11 11 55 

Weston 10 7 8 7 32 

Waltham 

Other 1 .. .. 1 



27 



24 



19 



18 



88 



184 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



School Statistics 

Membership by Rooms and Grade 
December 31, 1951 

Teacher — Room Boys 



Grade 
Kdg: 

A.M. Mrs. Warren 14 

P.M. Mrs. Warren 10 

I Miss Gavel 12 

Mrs. Booth k 11 

II Miss Wilson 15 

Mrs. Weaver 17 



III Miss Antonangeli 
Mrs. Robitaille. . 



10 

8 



IV Mr. Johnson 11 

Mr. Sapienza 10 

V Mrs. Flagg 10 

Mrs. Sullivan 10 

VI Mrs. Paranya 8 

Mr. McVinney 9 

VII Mr. Czarnowski 16 

VIII Mr. Berger 10 



Girls 

13 
12 

12 

13 

11 
12 

14 
16 

11 
13 

11 

10 

10 
11 

16 
19 



Totals 



27 




22 


49 


24 




24 


48 


26 




29 


55 


24 




24 


48 


22 




23 


45 


21 




20 


41 


18 




20 


38 




32 




29 



16 Totals 181 



204 



385 



Per Pupil Costs — 1951 

1. Population of Town 2,427 

2. Average School Membership 459 

3. Equalized Valuation, per Pupil . ; $10,517 00 

4. Expenditures for Schools $127,490 04 

5. Receipts Accredited to School $23,613 10 

6. Net Expenditure from Local Taxation $103,876 94 

7. Expenditures per Pupil $277 75 

8. Per Pupil Net Expenditure from Local Taxation $226 31 

9. Receipts per Pupil $51 44 

10. Transportation: Elementary High School Total 

Number of Pupils 326 87 413 

Mileage 25,508 16,706 42,214 

Expenditure S7,443 61 $5,38112 $12,824 73 

11. Expenditure per Pupil $20 01 $6185 $27 94 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 185 



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186 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET 
FOR 1952 

Budget Items Expenditure Expenditure Recommended 

1950 1951 1952 

I. General Control: 

Salaries $6,936 60 $9,158 08 $10,600 00 

Expenses 504 10 675 96 954 00 

II. Instruction: 

Salaries 43,876 04 55,488 20 68,655 00 

Textbooks 1,526 25 2,300 96 2,277 23 

Supplementary Books 

and Supplies 2,16113 3,846 33 3,50158 

III. Operation: 

Salaries 4,500 00 4,523 14 5,020 00 

Fuel 3,164 23 3,429 91 3,865 00 

Supplies 590 58 1,459 82 1,222 00 

Utilities: 

Ligh and Power 1,424 76 1,628 78 2,290 00 

Water 229 52 229 52 316 00 

Telephone 253 83 325 75 357 00 

IV. Maintenance: 

Repairs and Upkeep 624 79 2,129 03 1,413 95 

New Equipment 1,922 35 2,706 51 674 13 

V. Auxiliary Agencies: 

Health 73188 746 03 865 00 

Transportation 10,119 00 12,824 73 13,705 00 

Tuition 25,594 71 25,496 10 29,196 00 

Miscellaneous 323 18 352 17 350 00 

VI. Vocational 305 70 169 02 470 00 

Totals $104,788 65 $127,490 04 $145,731 89 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



187 



Graduated in June, 1951 



Grade VIII 



Dimitri D. Afonsky 
Amelia Joan Argento 
Abigail Cole 
Cynthia Agnes Corrigan 
Charles Edward Crane, Jr. 
Richard Henry Dunbrack 
Lucretia Hoover 
Elizabeth Hoover 
John Hurd, II 
Thomas Merriman Kimball 
Halina Kleindienst 
Margaret K. Lahnstein 
Richard I. Liddick 
Robert Daniel McCart 
Patricia Joyce Neary 

Elizabeth 



Penelope Eaton Paddock 
James Henry Pallotta 
George Jeffrey Patterson 
Jean Catherine Rando 
Richard Bellows Rice, Jr, 
Richard Wells Robbins 
Margaret C. Rooney 
Charles William Snelling 
Stephen Spooner 
Claora Elizabeth Styron 
Richard Erwin Tandy 
Andrew Lex Taylor 
Robert Joseph Tracey 
Conrad Hatheway Todd 
Henry Eldridge Warner, 
Jean Williamson 



II 



John Ciraso 
Carol Cousins 
Lesley Crowson 
Barbara Cullen 
Paul J. Dorian 
Elizabeth Dougherty 
Robert Dunbrack 
Frank Gordon 
Barbara Hart 



Concord High School 

Frances Henley 
Jean Kinsler 
Paul Leslie 
Raymond Maher 
Constance Moszka 
Richard Picazio 
Jeanne Russes 
Mary Ann Simonds 
Caroline Stone 
Milica Trofimov 



Weston High School 

Parker Spooner Malcolm Stone 

Richard Thorpe 

Honors 

Amelia Joan Argento DeCordova Medal 

Barbara Cullen Lincoln Scholarship 

Elizabeth Dougherty Lincoln Award 

DA.R. Good Citizenship Award 



188 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



STAFF ROSTER, JANUARY 1, 1952 



Name 
Andrew J. Manges 

Louis J. Sapienza 

Phyllis Johnson 
Augusta F. Sisk 

Martha H. Booth 

Ann G. Paranya 
Irma Antonangeli 

Edward J. Czarnowski 
Eleanor F. Sullivan 

Joseph P. McVinney 
Hazel Flagg 
Miriam Zartarian 
Harvey R. Berger 
Dorothy E. Booth 
Sylvia R. Gavel 
Robert J. Johnson 
Ruthjane Robitaille 
Joan B. Warren 
Judith C. Weaver 
Madeleine C. Wilson 



Position 

Superintendent 
of Schools 



Administrative 
Assistant 

Grade Two 

Remedial and 
Guidance 

Music 

Departmental 
Grade Three 

Departmental 
Grade Five 

Departmental 
Grade Five 
Art 

Departmental 
Grade One 
Grade One 
Grade Four 
Grade Three 
Kindergarten 
Grade Two 
Grade Two 



Training Appointed 

Butler University 1948 
Harvard Grad. Sch. of Ed., 

A.B., M.S.Ed. 

Boston University, B.S.Ed. 1950 

Lesley College, B.S.Ed. 1946 

Boston University, B.S.Ed. 1946 

Radcliffe, Harvard Sch. of Ed., A.B., 1949 

A.M.T. 

S. T. C, Montclair, N. J., A.B. 1949 

Fitchburg State Teachers College, 1950 

B.S.Ed. 

Boston University, B.S.Ed., Ed.M. 1950 
Wilson Teachers College, Washington , 1950 

D. C. 

Boston University, B.S.Ed. 1950 

Sargent 1951 

Tufts College, B.S.Ed. 1951 

Tufts College, A.B., Ed.M. 1951 

Indiana University, B.S.Ed. 1951 

Tufts College, B.S.Ed. 1951 

Boston University, A.A., B.S.Ed. 1951 

Boston University, A.A., B.S.Ed. 1951 

Boston University, B.S.Ed. 1951 

Wheelock, B.S.Ed. 1951 

Wellesley College, A.B. 1951 



WARRANT 189 

NOTICE 
Business Meeting, Monday, March 3, 1952, at 7:30 P.M. 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Lincoln, qualified to vote in Town Meeting for the Transaction 
of Town affairs, to meet in the Town House in said Lincoln, 
on Monday the third day of March next at 7 :30 o'clock P.M . 
then and there to act on the following articles except Article 1 
and also to meet in said Town House on Saturday, the eighth 
day of March next, at 12 o'clock Noon, then and there to act 
on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of this Warrant, 
by you attested in each of the Post Offices, and in some other 
public place in said Town seven days at least before the third 
day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, 
March eighth will be open at 12 o'clock Noon, and may be 
closed at 7 o'clock P.M. 

Article 1. To bring in their votes for the following Town 
Officers and any other officers required by law, to be elected by 
Australian Ballot viz: 

One Town Clerk for one year. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen for three years. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 



190 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 
One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for three 

years. 
One member of the Board of Health for three years. 
One Tree Warden for one year. 
One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for three 

years. 
One member of the Trustees of the Bemis Fund for Free 

Public Lectures for three years. 
One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners for 

three years. 
One member of the Planning Board for five years. 
One Director for the deCordova and Dana Museum and 

Park for four years. 



Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers, required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 
any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to 
employ for additional compensation any of its members and 
to fix additional compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 



Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the neces- 
sary and expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything 
in relation to the same. 

Selectmen 



WARRANT 191 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning January 1, 1952, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year and to renew any note 
or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Selectmen 



Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct services 
on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint a committee, 
raise and appropriate money, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

By Petition 



Article 8. To see if the Town will: Instruct the Moderator 
to appoint an editorial committee of voters of the Town to 
advise the Selectmen concerning the content and preparation 
of the Town Report, appropriate not to exceed $100 for the use 
of such a Committee; or take other action with reference to 
the matter. 

Town Auditor 



Article 9. To see if the Town will accept as a public w r ay, 
the private road, known as Giles Road, as shown on a plan 
recorded with South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds. 
Plan book, 7, 729, plan 520, and approved by the planning 
board of the Town of Lincoln, September 13, 1951 . 

By Petition 



Article 10. To see if the Town will accept as a public way, 
the private road, known as Silver Birch Lane, as shown on a 
plan recorded with South Middlesex District Registry of 
Deeds. Plan book, 7735 plan 544 and approved by the plan- 
ning board of the Town of Lincoln, October 25, 1950. 

By Petition 



192 TOWN OF LINCOLN 

Article 11. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$1,500 to be paid to Leland A. and Irene E. Wildes as com- 
promise settlement,- for damages to their real estate, arising 
from the re-location of Bedford Road, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to acquire by 

purchase, gift, eminent domain or any other way, a parcel of 
land located at the North West intersection of Bedford Road 
and Route 2 containing 40,000 square feet more or less and 
appropriate the sum of $3,000 therefor or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Fire Engineers and Selectmen 



Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,886.19 to pay the following unpaid 
1951 bills. 

Board of Assessors $14 25 

Fire Department 13 50 

Insurance 1 ,164 94 

Board of Health . . . 16 75 

Schools 4 25 

Legal ".. 672 50 

Treasurer 



Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a sand spreader 
for the use of the Highway Department or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Town By-Laws by striking out Section 8 of Article IV and sub- 
stituting therefore the following Section 8 of Article IV or take 
any other action relative thereto. 



WARRANT 193 

Section 8; 

No Town Officer, Board, Department or Committee having 
the matter in charge shall (1) execute any contract involving 
an estimated expenditure of $1,000 or more for labor, equip- 
ment, materials or supplies, or any combination of same, or 
(2) otherwise purchase from a single supplier at one time any 
property having an estimated aggregate value of $1,000 or 
more, without inviting proposals therefor from two or more 
reliable parties regularly engaged in performing similar con- 
tracts and supplying similar requirements, provided however, 
that if no proposals are received from such invitation, or as an 
alternative to the foregoing procedure, proposals shall be in- 
vited by public advertisement published in Middlesex or 
Suffolk County inviting bids therefor, reserving the right to 
reject any and all proposals. No contract nor bid shall be 
split, separated or divided, for the purpose of avoiding this 
By-Law by reducing the amount below $1,000. 

This Section shall not apply to purchase of materials in con- 
nection with work to be performed under Chapters 81 or 90 
under specifications of, and at prices established by the State 
Department of Public Works. 

Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our hands this 11th 
day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-two. 

HENRY DeC. WARD, 
JOHN O. WILSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



n 



ep 



or 



t 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



C^own of loLncoLn 



FOR THE YEAR 1952 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



PRINTED BY 

COLEMAN & COMPANY, INC. 

NATICK. MASSACHUSETTS 

1953 



(contents 



Town Calendar inside cover 

Foreword 1 

TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Officers and Committees 2 

Selectmen 9 

Town Clerk 15 

Town Meetings 15 

Elections 27 

Licenses 42 

FINANCE 

Auditors 43 

Treasurer 48 

Collector of Taxes ....... 64 

Assessors . • 67 

Trust Fund Commissioners 70 

Finance Committee Recommendations , . 74 

PROTECTION 

Police Department 84 

Fire Engineers 86 

Inspector of Animals 87 

Civil Defense Agency 88 

Tree Warden 88 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 90 

Nursing Committee { X\ 

Old Age Assistance and Public Welfare . 95 

Union Health Department 97 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 99 

Board of Zoning Appeals . . . . . 100 

Water Commissioners 103 

Study for League of Women Voters 

on Water Supply 109 

Superintendent of Streets 126 

Cemetery Commissioners 128 

Inspectors 130 

School Building Committee 131 

EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Library Trustees 132 

Bemis Free Lectures 136 

Middlesex County Extension Service . . 137 

Recreation Committee . . . . . 139 

Memorial Day Committee 140 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park . . 141 

School Committee 147 

WARRANT OF 1953 191 

Fire Calls opposite 204 

APPENDIX 

Vital Statistics 205 

Valuation List . . . - 209 

Cemetery Funds . . . . ... .233 

Trust Funds 234 



9c 



orewor 



<? 



We believe that this Town Report makes a major step 
in the direction of being more useful to the Citizens of 
the Town. In our report to the Selectmen, we stated 
general objectives for the Report, and made specific 
recommendations summarized as follows: 

The Town Report should be designed to be of the 
greatest service to the typical reader. We believe this 
reader is a person who does not follow Town affairs 
regularly, and who has only an imperfect knowledge of 
whatever he has learned in the past about the duties 
and responsibilities of the various officers and boards. 

For such a reader, the Town Report needs to be in 
part a restatement of the procedures of Town govern- 
ment — especially as they relate to issues which are 
currently under consideration. The Report needs to con- 
tain summaries of recent developments, to be so organized 
that it aids the reader to get full information about cur- 
rent issues. Also, the Report should attempt to create 
and hold the reader's interest. 

The recommendations the Selectmen approved are : 

1. Rearrangement of the contents, so related matters 
are placed together. 

2. Separation into a statistical appendix of the long- 
detailed tables, thus leaving the more significant 
material in the reports to appear without interrup- 
tion of the Report. 

3. Improvement of individual reports, with the ob- 
jective of making them more informative. 

4. Redesign, keeping the present page size, but aiding 
the reader with better lay-out and typography. 

5. Continued attention to improving the Report. 

We acknowledge with real appreciation the cooperation 
of Town Officers, the authors of the individual reports, 
and Henry B. Kane, who gave the drawing for the cover. 

The Town Report Committer 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Elected Town Officers 



Moderator Term Expires 

DONALD P. DONALDSON - 1954 

Town Cleric 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1953 

Selectmen and Board of Public Welfare 

JOHN O. WILSON, Chairman 1955 

EDMUND W. GILES 1953 

HENRY DeC. WARD 1954 

Assessors 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, Jr., Chairman 1953 

ARTHUR W. RICE - 1954 

G. ARNOLD WILEY 1955 

Treasurer 

FREDERICK B. TAYLOR 1953 

Collector of Taxes 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1953 

Auditor 

PEARSON HUNT 1953 

School Committee 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, Chairman 1953 

LUCY E. BYGRAVE - 1954 

ERNEST P. NEUMANN 1955 

Water Commissioners 

SUMNER SMITH, Chairman 1953 

ROBERT W. SCOTT „ 1954 

HENRY WARNER 1955 

Board of Health 

GORDON A. DONALDSON, Chairman 1955 

WARREN F. FLINT 1953 

NANCY D. HURD 1954 

Tree Warden 

DANIEL A. MacINNIS, Jr 1953 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 3 

Cemetery Commissioners Term Expires 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM, Chairman „ 1953 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON 1954 

JAMES B. BILLINGS m 1955 

Planning Board 

ALAN McCLENNEN, Chairman , 1954 

WILLIAM T. KING „ 1953 

HOWARD SNELLING : 1955 

RICHARD J. EATON 1956 

ARTHUR T. HOWARD 1957 

Measurer of Wood and Bark 

HAROLD S. COUSINS (resigned) „ 1953 

CLIFFORD J. BRADLEY (appointed) _ 1953 

JOSEPH R. TRACEY 1953 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 

CLEMENT C. SAWTELL, Chairman 1955 

LEONARD C. LARRABEE 1954 

HENRY DeC. WARD 1953 

Trustees of Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures 

CHRISTOPHER W. HURD, Chairman , 1955 

MABEL H. TODD „ 1953 

LEONARD C. LARRABEE 1954 

Trustees of Lincoln Library 

ROLAND C. MacKENZIE, Chairman 
GEORGE G. TARBELL 
ALICE G. MERIAM 

JOHN O. WILSON, Chairman Selectmen ex-officio 
MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, Chairman 
School Committee ex-officio 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park 

A. Directors 

CHARLES H. BLAKE „ 1953 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING - - 1954 

JANE K. VANCE - 1 955 

JOHN Q. ADAMS 1956 

B. Directors 

RICHARD S. MERIAM— appointed by Library Trustees 1955 

PEARSON HUNT — appointed by School Committee 1953 

ARTHUR E.| THIESSEN— appointed by Selectmen 1954 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Officers and Committees 
Appointed by the Board of Selectmen 



Term Expires 
Clerk of Selectmen and Public Welfare Agent 
M. ELIZABETH CAUSER - „ m 1953 

Acting Superintendent of Streets 
CLIFFORD H. BRADLEY 1953 

Chief of Police 
LEO J. ALGEO 1953 

Police Officers 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT „ - 1953 

JAMES J. DIAMOND 1953 

Constables 

LEO J. ALGEO „ .. 1953 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT » r 1953 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 1953 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM „ 1953 

Dog Officers 

LEO J. ALGEO 1953 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT „ 1953 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
LEO J. ALGEO - - - 1953 

Special Police 

JOHN T. ALGEO JOHN GILBERT 

BOB BERNSON FRANCIS T. GILBERT 

ROBERT H. BOOTH FRANK GORDON 

FLORIY CAMPOBASSO HARRY B. KNOWLES 

JOSEPH CAMPOBASSO WARREN RICE 

JOHN COOK EDWARD D. ROONEY 

HENRY J. DAVIS DANIEL RYAN 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE SUMNER SMITH 

WILLIAM DOHERTY FRANCIS J. SMITH 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY JOSEPH TRACEY 

JOSEPH FRAZIER HENRY WARNER 
ORRIN C. WOOD 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 5 

Fire Engineers Term Expires 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY - 1953 

JOSEPH TRACEY „ - 1953 

CHARLES K. FITTS - - 1953 

Forest Warden 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY r „ 1953 

Deputy Forest Warden 

JOSEPH TRACEY „ „ 1953 

Petroleum Inspector 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY ...„ _ 1953 

Director of Civil Defense 

ROBERT H. BOOTH . 1953 

Building Inspector 

NILS SWANSON 1953 

Plumbing Inspector 

GLENNY S. CUTTER .'. 1953 

Wiring Inspector 

WILLIAM DEAN 1953 

Board of Appeals 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL, Chairman.... „ 1956 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE, Secretary 1955 

ANDREW J. O'REILLY (resigned) 1954 

HENRY B. HOOVER .. „ 1953 

CHARLES K. FITTS 1957 

Associate Members 

THOMAS B. ADAMS 1954 

WILLIAM DEAN 195 

Registrars of Voters 

MANLEY B. BOYCE - 1955 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1953 

HENRY J. DAVIS 1954 

WILLIAM J. DAVIS, Town Clerk ex-officio 195 I 



6 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance Term Expires 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER 1953 

MARFAN N. OBER „ „...„ m 1953 

JOHN J. KELLIHER „ 1953 



Member of District Nursing Committee 
ALBERTA A. FRADD _ 



1953 



Fence Viewers 

GEORGE G. TARBELL...._..„ 

JOHN J. KELLIHER _ 



1953 
1953 



Field Drivers 



JOHN T. GILES 

JAMES M. NEVILLE...... 



1953 
1953 



Surveyor of Cord Wood 
CLIFFORD BRADLEY ..... , 



1953 



Recreation Committee 

ETHAN A. MURPHY, Chairman. 

WILLIAM DeFORD ....~ - 

ASTRID L. DONALDSON. 

MALCOLM DONALDSON . 

JOHN B. GARRISON - .. 

ROBERT W. GRAY „ „. „... 

E. DOLAN ROONEY . . 

SADIE J. SHERMAN . . 

DAVID TODD — 



1953 
1953 
1953 
1953 
1953 
1953 
1953 
1953 
1953 



EDMUND W. GILES. 



Veterans' Agent 



1953 



Caretaker of Town Hall and Library 
ORRIN C. WOOD „ ~...~ 



1953 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Jury List, 1952 
Name 
THOMAS B. ADAMS 
HAROLD T. ASHWORTH 
PAUL BROOKS 
CHARLES E. CRANE 
GEORGE A. CUNNINGHAM 
RICHARD J. EATON 
HARRY COOK 
LAURENCE COUSINS 
SHERMAN H. DAVIS 
JAMES DIAMOND 
EDWARD DANOSKY 
ANTHONY FAUNCE 
CHARLES K. FITTS 
THOMAS T. GILES 
FRANK GORDON 
THOMAS A. O. GROSS. 
ARTHUR T. HOWARD 
MERRILL HUNT 
KARL F. LAHNSTEIN . 
LOUIS E. PADDOCK 
ROBERT PELLANDINI 
ROLAND W. ROBBINS 
EHLERT W. SEECKTS 
FREDERICK M. SPOONER 
JOHN B. TEW 



Occupation 
Executive 
Radio Engineer 
Publisher 

Industrial Real Estate 
Fireman 
Trustee 
Farmer 

Plant Superintendent 
Farmer 
Police Work 
Farmer 
Insurance 
Buyer 

Garage Superintendent 
Milkman 

Electrical Engineer 
Printer 
Executive 
Museum Work 
Industrial Engineer 
Pay Roll Clerk 
Painting Contractor 
Assistant Manager 
General Man 
Investment Analyst 



Appointed by the Treasurer 



Assistant Treasurer 
M. ELIZABETH CAUSER 



Term Expires 
1953 



Appointed by the Board of Health 



Community Nurse 
MARIAN N. OBER 1953 

Burial Agent 
WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1953 

Inspector of Animals 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY _ 1953 



8 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Appointed by the Moderator 

Finance Committee Term Expires 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO, Chairman 1954 

LELAND A. WILDES, Secretary 1954 

WILLIAM N. PAGE - m 1955 

THOMAS J. ROUNER „ .. 1953 

PAUL L. NORTON 1953 

Memorial Day Committee 

MARY S. HENDERSON 1953 

SADIE SHERMAN .. - 1953 

REV. MORRIS ROBINSON 1953 

E. DONLAN ROONEY „ 1953 

METRO FEDOCK - 1953 

Building Code Committee 

NORMAN F. BRISSON WILLIAM M. DEAN 

ROBERT BYGRAVE MANNING W. MacRAE 

HENRY B. HOOVER 

Union Health Department 

NANCY D. HURD RICHARD K. CONANT 

JEAN MURPHY ELLIOTT R. HEDGE 

BRADFORD CANNON 

School Building Committee 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL PEARSON HUNT 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE 

Editorial Committee for Town Report 

MARY K. VAN LEER JOSEPH J. O'REILLY 

PEARSON HUNT HENRY F. THOMA 

VICTOR A. LUTNICKI 

200th Anniversary Celebration Committee 

WILLIAM RAND, Chairman FREDERICK H. GREEN, JR. 

ALICE W. SMITH EDITH B. FARRAR 

E. DONLAN ROONEY 



Csown tjovernrnent 



Report of the Boord of Selectmen 

A number of new problems are being faced by the 
Town, some being the result of increased population dur- 
ing the past few years and others the result of develop- 
ments outside the Town. Some of the problems are ad- 
ministrative, to be handled by the Selectmen; others re- 
quire careful study and action by the citizens. 



Light Industrial Zone 

Probably the most important problem over the long 
term is the proposed creation of a light industrial zone 
along the Airport Access Road abutting land already 
taken by the Airport. The matter was officially brought 
before the Town by a petition' to the Planning Board to 
amend the Zoning By-Law, the purpose of which is to 
minimize the effect of the Airport expansion on Lincoln 
and to permit continued control of adjacent areas. It is 
the contention of the petitioners that complete rigidity 
may result in loss of control which would be far more 
damaging than the effects of studied flexibility in our 
Zoning By-Law. Many citizens have worked earnestly 
on this subject. Special commendation is due the League 
of Women Voters for their impartial inquiry and their 
report which, it is hoped, will be ready for distribution 



10 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

before long. The basic nature of this problem and the 
multitude of divergent opinions held by thoughtful people 
indicate the desirability of more study before the Town 
is asked to take action. 

Town Administration 

Most of the Town Officers and Committees are serving 
on a part-time basis. They are busy earning a living and 
taking care of their own affairs, but give their efforts and 
as much time as possible to the Town because they 
believe in this type of local government. Salaries, if any, 
are usually nominal, probably no more than enough to 
cover out-of-pocket expenses. The Selectmen believe that 
this system should be continued but fully recognize that 
increased population and appropriations have multiplied 
the work to the point that not everything is being done, 
or can be expected to be done, as well or as economically 
as it should be. It must be added that except for the 
highly capable and tireless assistance of Mrs. Causer and 
Mr. Davis, the situation would have required attention 
long ago. The 1953 budget includes the salary of a full- 
time assistant in the Selectmen's Office instead of part- 
time assistance as heretofore, but more than that is 
recommended. Under a special article the Town will be 
asked to appropriate funds for the employment of a full- 
time man who might be termed Assistant to the Select- 
men. It is contemplated that he will meet with the Select- 
men and other Boards on request, do preliminary assigned 
work for them, co-ordinate purchasing and the use of 
Town Equipment, and be available for consultation on 
the day-to-day emergencies that arise. This is not a 
position as Town Manager, for he would have only such 
duties as are delegated to him from time to time by the 
Town Officers who would continue to have full authority 
and to be fully responsible. 

Gymnasium 

The School Committee and Selectmen have considered 
the problems having to do with use of the Gymnasium 



SELECTMEN 11 

which both groups recognize was built for Town as 
well as School use. It has been agreed that for practical 
reasons the Gymnasium must be under the control of 
the School Committee and that the Superintendent of 
Schools as their Agent must be the person having day- 
to-day supervision. Any applications for use of the Gym- 
nasium should be made to the Superintendent's office. 
It was further agreed that a janitor should be in attend- 
ance at all times except when the Superintendent chooses 
to designate some other person to take over the responsi- 
bility for protection of the property. The janitor will be 
entitled to an hourly charge, with a minimum fee for any 
evening, to be paid at the time by the group using the 
building. It is now contemplated that any additional 
charge, such as rent, will be made. 

Town Dump 

The Town Dump has been operated on rented land 
for many years and without an attendant on hand. Cook 
Brothers, owners of the land now rented, have asked us 
to find another location and considerable work has been 
done by the Planning Board in finding the proper place. 
It seems likely that the Town will have to buy land, but 
whether it buys or not, an attendant seems necessary 
on such days as the dump is open. Action by the Town 
at the Annual Meeting may be recommended. 

Road Takings 

Pursuant to action at the 1952 Annual Town Meeting 
at which it was voted to be the sense of the Meeting 
that the Selectmen should make takings on additional 
Town roads, petitions have been filed with the County 
for laying out Page Road, Baker Bridge Road, Bedford 
Lane and Old Concord Road. 

Chapter 90 Highway Construction 

The Selectmen recommended to the County and State 
that Chapter 90 construction funds in 1953 be allocated 



12 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

to improvements on Weston Road starting at the Weston 
line. This work would include widening, reduction in 
the curves, elimination of the high crown in the road 
and resurfacing. The plan for relocation of this road 
which was completed three years ago involves no sub- 
stantial land takings. The exact plans and specifications 
for the construction have not been prepared, but of 
course the road must keep within the taking as shown 
on the plan which may be seen again at the Town House 
by those who attended the hearings or by others who are 
interested. Fifty per cent of the cost of Chapter 90 
construction is paid by the State, twenty-five per cent 
by the County and twenty-five per cent by the Town. 
It applies to secondary roads connecting two towns such 
as Weston Road and not to purely internal roads such as 
Beaver Pond Road. 

S+ickel Case 
The suit against the Town brought by Frederick 
Stickel some years ago for alleged damage to the gar- 
denias in his greenhouse on Route 2A due to contamina- 
tion of the Town water has not been disposed of. A settle- 
ment involving a payment by the Town of $1,750 is still 
under consideration and the Town may be asked to ap- 
propriate this amount under a special article. 

Speed Zoning 
The speed-zoning regulations for several roads in 
Lincoln referred to in the 1951 Report were approved 
by the Department of Public Works and the Registry 
of Motor Vehicles during 1952 and became effective on 
Route 117 with the erection of the authorized speed limit 
signs late in the year. The Police have observed a more 
even flow of traffic with fewer very slow-moving vehicles 
and fewer speeding cars, the latter perhaps due to the 
relative ease of getting convictions in Court when such 
signs are erected. It is anticipated that the balance of 
the 1951 special appropriation and a small amount from 
highway funds will be used to erect signs on Route 126 
in 1953. 



SELECTMEN 13 

Revision of Building Code 

The Building Code Committee has submitted its re- 
vision to Mr. L. C. Roy for professional study and com- 
ment. Mr. Roy, who recently revised the Brookline Code, 
was unable to complete his work in time for action at 
the March 1953 Meeting. 

Revision of Town By-Laws 

Due to the practical impossibility of obtaining ap- 
proval of Town By-Laws by the recent Attorney General, 
the Committee to Revise the Town By-Laws suspended 
operations. It is now being reactivated. This Commit- 
tee's attention was directed to all Town By-Laws other 
than those on Zoning and Building. 

Revision of Town Report 

The Committee appointed by vote at the 1952 Annual 
Town Meeting to advise the Selectmen concerning the 
content and preparation of the Town Report proved most 
helpful and cooperative. Many of their recommendations 
have been incorporated. Others could not be worked out 
immediately. It is enthusiastically urged that this Com- 
mittee be continued for another year. 

200th Anniversary 

The Committee appointed by vote of the November 
1952 Meeting to make recommendations for the 200th 
Anniversary of the Town will make its report at the 
March Meeting. Although an appropriate celebration 
will require active support by many individuals and sub- 
committees, it is recommended that the present Commit- 
tee be continued to have over-all responsibility for the 
program. All comments and suggestions are appreciated 
for there are any number of functions that can be in- 
cluded on such an occasion. It is the opinion of the Com- 
mittee that an appropriation of $2,500 for its use should 
be made at this time. 



14 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Zoning On Route 2 

It was proposed to the 1952 Legislature that an act 
should be passed preventing any relaxation of zoning by- 
laws as they affect property on both sides of Route 2 in 
the Towns of Belmont, Arlington, Lexington, Lincoln and 
Concord. Chapter 402 as passed limits the restriction to 
Lincoln and Concord, both of which Towns have until 
1954 to accept the Act at their annual Town elections. 
This act, although disappointing, accomplishes at least 
part of what the Town wanted. It will appear on the 
ballot for the election on March 7, 1953. 



The death of Nils P. Swanson in late December 1952 
took from us a friend who had served as Building Inspec- 
tor for a relatively short time but in most efficient and 
helpful manner and with complete devotion to the best 
interests of the Town. 



H. Bigelow Hills, former Selectman and active partici- 
pant in local Red Cross affairs and other worth while 
causes passed on in October 1952. He had maintained a 
keen interest in Lincoln and its citizens even after moving 
to Weston. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND W. GILES 

HENRY DeC. WARD 

JOHN O. WILSON, Chairman 



TOWN MEETINGS 15 



Town Clerk's Report 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events 
and activities and issues licenses and certificates. His 
duties include recording the proceedings at Town Meet- 
ings and elections, and notifying the Selectmen and other 
officers concerned of appropriations which have been 
voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept 
at the Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters 
in the Town should communicate with the Clerk. 



Annual Town Meeting 

Monday, March 3, 1952 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson 
at 7:30 o'clock P.M. The return of the Warrant was read, 
and the Moderator called attention to Article 1. (Election 
of Officers). 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Voted: That Harold S. Cousins and Joseph R. Tracey 
be elected Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commisioners and Trustees. 

Voted: That the reports of the Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commisioners and Trustees as printed in the 
Town Report be accepted and that the reports of the 
following Committees be accepted as interim reports and 
that the Committees and their unexpended appropriations 



16 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

be continued: Building Code Committee, Lincoln Recrea- 
tion Committee, Union Health Committee and Committee 
to Revise the Town By-laws. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any of 
its members and to fix additional compensation of such 
members. 

Voted: That the salaries of the elected officers of the 
Town for the current year be fixed at the following 
amounts respectively: 

Selectmen each $200.00 Assessors Chairman $200.00 

Treasurer 200.00 Assessors other members each 175.00 

Collector of Taxes 1,600.00 Auditor - 50.00 

Town Clerk .. 350.00 Water Commissioners each... 75.00 

and that one or more Cemetery Commissioners be auth- 
orized to work on the Cemetery grounds at the rate of 
$1.00 per hour. 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate for the necessary 
and expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything 
in relation to the same. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate under 
Artirle 5, an aggregate sum of $382,261.15 consisting of 
the several itemized appropriations as recommended by 
the Finance Committee in their report on pages 54 to 59, 
inclusive of the printed Town Report for the year 1951, 
numbered 1 to 77, inclusive and the un-numbered item 
designated "Water Works Recommendations" read to the 
Meeting as follows: The items increased were Police by 
$600.00, Schools by $2,740.00 and item 70 by $42.15 a 
total increase of $3,382.15 which total is included in the 
aggregate sum above. An amendment under item No. 56 
"that the minimum pay rate per hour for Custodians or 
Janitors of the Lincoln Schools shall be no less than the 
maximum pay rate per hour of any other nonsupervisory 
employee of the Town of Lincoln," was lost, as was also 
an amendment to item No. 59 "that the sum of $2,500.00 



TOWN MEETINGS 17 

shall be appropriated for Black top Surfacing of the bus 
turn around at the Central School as originally called 
for in the 1952 School Budget and the work shall be 
done by the Town of Lincoln Highway Department." 

Total recommendations $348,482.15. (Details appear 
in Treasurer's Report). 

Water Works Recommendations— $33,779.00. 

And that the appropriation of $33,779.00 for Water 
Works be taken from the Water Works Treasury; and 
that $9,500.00 of the appropriation under "item 45. 
Chapter 90" be taken from Free Cash and returned there- 
to when reimbursed by the State and County ; and that of 
the amount appropriated under item "59 Schools Equip- 
ment Supplies and Miscellaneous" $646.75 be taken from 
accumulated income from the DeCordova School Equip- 
ment Fund and $85.55 from accumulated income from the 
Grammar School Fund ; and that item "74. Reserve Fund 
$4,000..00" be taken from Overlay Surplus account; and 
that $25,000.00 of the appropriation of $37,000.00 under 
item "75. Bonds" be taken from free cash; and that 
$1,807.80 of the appropriation of $37,000.00 under item 
"75. Bonds" be taken from the bond sale premium reserve 
balance; and that the following amounts be hereby ap- 
propriated to surplus from their unexpended reserve bal- 
ances as set forth in the Treasurer's Report; 

Gazette $60.08 

War Memorial Committee 50.00 

Highway Equipment Building Construction... 117.83 

Highway Equipment Building Equipment 65.93 

Resurfacing Tennis Court - 10.73 

Accrued Bond Interest Reserve 776.32 

Total 1,080.89 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 
1952, and to issue a note or notes therefor payable 
within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 



18 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of 
the Selectmen be authorized to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1952 and to issue a note or 
notes therefor payable within one year and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct 
services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint 
a committee, raise and appropriate money or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator be authorized to appoint 
a committee of five to plan and carry out exercises on 
Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May next and that the 
Town raise and appropriate the sum of two hundred and 
twenty-five ($225.00) dollars for the use of such com- 
mittee in connection with these exercises. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will : Instruct the Mod- 
erator to appoint an editorial committee of voters of the 
Town to advise the Selectmen concerning the content and 
preparation of the Town Report, appropriation not to 
exceed $100.00 for the use of such Committee; or take 
other action with reference to the matter. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee of at 
least three voters of the Town to recommend to the 
Selectmen possible improvements in the content of the 
Town Report and the manner of its presentation, and that 
$100.00 be appropriated from free cash for the expenses 
of such committee. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will accept as a public- 
way the private road, known as Giles Road, as shown on 
a plan recorded with South Middlesex District Registry 
of Deeds, Plan Book, 7, 729, plan 520, and approved by 



TOWN MEETINGS 19 

the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln, September 
13, 1951. 

Voted: That, subject to the receipt of a deed in form 
satisfactory to the Selectmen the Town accept as a public 
way the private road known as Giles Road, as shown on 
a plan approved by the Planning Board, September 13, 
1951 and filed in the Land Registration Office Plan Book, 
7,729, plan 520, 

Article 10. To see if the Town will accept as a public 
way, the private road known as Silver Birch Lane, as 
shown on a plan recorded with South Middlesex District 
Registry of Deeds. Plan Book 7735, plan 544 and approved 
by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln October 25, 
1950. 

Voted: That, subject to the receipt of a deed in form 
satisfactory to the Selectmen, the Town accept as a public 
way the private road known as Silver Birch Lane, as 
shown on a plan recorded with South Middlesex District 
Registry of Deeds. Plan book 7735, plan 544 and approved 
by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln October 

25, 1950. 

• 

Article 11. To see if the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $1,500.00 to be paid to Leland A. and Irene E. 
Wildes as compromise settlement for damages to their 
real estate arising from the re-location of Bedford Road, 
or take -any action relative thereto. 

Voted: To authorize the Selectmen to settle all claims 
of Leland A. and Irene E. Wildes concerning any possible 
damages which might have been suffered at the time of 
the re-location of Bedford Road, August 23, 1950 or 
subsequent thereto and to secure from said Leland A. and 
Irene E. Wildes proper releases running in favor of the 
Town and to appropriate the sum of $1,500.00, said sum 
to be taken from free cash. And be it Resolved; that it is 
the sense of this meeting that the Selectmen proceed 
as soon as practicable with the taking of untaken roads 
in the Town with the cooperation and help of the County 
and State Public Offices. 



20 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to acquire 
by purchase, gift, eminent domain or any other way, a 
parcel of land located at the North West intersection of 
Bedford Road and Route 2 containing 40,000 square feet 
more or less and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 there- 
for or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be authorized to purchase 
on behalf of the inhabitants of the Town of Lincoln from 
Elizabeth A. and Edward B. Cunningham a parcel of land 
at the Northwest intersection of Bedford Road and Route 
2 described as follows: Beginning at the Southeasterly 
corner thereof at a stone bound in the line of the Con- 
cord Turnpike thence N. 52° 00' 10" W. 190.00 feet to 
a point, thence turning at a right angle and running N. 
37° 59' 50" E. 205.00 feet to a corner; thence turning and 
running S. 45° 03' 00" E. 167.43 feet to Bedford Road, 
thence Southwesterly along Bedford Road 124.12 feet to 
a stone bound at a point of curve ; thence Southwesterly 
by a curve of 50 foot radius 109.59 feet to the point of 
beginning containing 41,139 ft., and to appropriate therel 
for the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000.00) said 
sum to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,886.19 to pay the following 
unpaid 1951 bills : 

Board of Assesors $14.25 Board of Health $16.75 
Fire Department 13.50 Schools 4.25 

Insurance 1,164.94 Legal 672.50 

Voted: That the Treasurer be authorized to pay the 
following 1951 unpaid bills : 

Board of Assessors Alma G. Bowen Reg- 
istrar of Deeds $ 14.25 
Fire Department, Wages 13.50 
Insurance Ted H. Oakey 1,164.94 
Board of Health West End Chevrolet 

Company 16.75 

Schools Rinehart & Company - - 4;25 



TOWN MEETINGS 21 

Legal C. T. Sittinger Consulting Engineer 672.50 



$1,886.19 

and that same be taken from Surplus. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a sand 
spreader for the use of the Highway Department, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $1,650.00 
for the purchase of a sand spreader for the Highway 
Department, said sum to be taken from Machinery Fund. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Town By-laws by striking out section 8 of Article 4 and 
substituting therefor the following section 8 of Article 
4, or take any other action relative thereto. Section 8. 
No Town Officer, Board, Department or Committee having 
the matter in charge shall (1) execute any contract in- 
volving an estimated expenditure of $1,000.00 or more 
for labor, equipment, materials or supplies, or any com- 
bination of same, or (2) otherwise purchase from a single 
supplier at one time any property having an estimated 
aggregate value of $1,000 or more, without inviting pro- 
posals therefor from two or more reliable parties regul r- 
ly engaged in performing similar contracts and supplying 
similar requirements, provided however, that if no pro- 
posals are received from such invitations or as an alterna- 
tive to the foregoing procedure, proposals shall be invited 
by public advertisement, published in Middlesex or Suffolk 
Counties inviting bids therefor, reserving the right to 
reject any and all proposals. No contract nor bid shall 
be split, separated or divided, for the purpose of avoiding 
this By-law by reducing the amount below $1,000. This 
section shall not apply to purchase of materials in con- 
nection with work to be performed under Chapters 81 
or 90 under specifications of, and at prices established 
by the State Department of Public Works. 

Voted: That the Town By-laws be amended by striking 
out Section 8 of Article 4 and substituting therefor the 



22 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

following- Section 8 of Article 4 : No Town Officer, Board, 
Department or Committee having the matter in charge 
shall (1) execute any contract involving an estimated 
expenditure of $1,000, or more for labor, equipment, ma- 
terials or supplies, or any combination of same, or (2) 
otherwise purchase from a single supplier at one time 
any property having an estimated aggregate value of 
$1,000 or more, without either inviting proposals there- 
for from two or more reliable parties regularly engaged 
in performing similar contracts and supplying similar 
requirements; or as an alternative to the foregoing pro- 
cedure inviting proposals by public advertisement pub- 
lished in Middlesex or Suffolk County inviting bids there- 
for, reserving the right to reject any and all proposals. 
If the first method is used but no proposals are received, 
the second method shall be used. No contract nor bid 
shall be split, separated or divided, for the purpose of 
avoiding this By-law by reducing the amount below 
$1,000. This Section shall not apply to purchase of ma- 
terials in connection with work to be performed under 
Chapters 81 or 90 under specifications of, and at prices 
established by the State Department of Public Works. 

Boston, Mass., October 9th, 1952. 

The foregoing by-law is hereby approved. 

FRANCIS R. KELLY, 
Attorney General 

Meeting adjourned at 10:25 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



TOWN MEETINGS 23 



Special Town Meeting 

Monday, November I Oth, 1952 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator at 7:30 o'clock P.M., 
the return of the Warrant was read and the various 
Articles acted upon as follows: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
funds for the removal of elm trees which are affected 
with the Dutch Elm Disease, on the public ways and on 
private property, or take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 
for removal of elm trees designated by the tree warden 
as being infected with the Dutch Elm Disease on the pub- 
lic ways and on private property subject to the case of 
trees on private property to receipt by the Selectmen of 
releases and agreements in form approved by them, said 
sum to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
additional funds for Aid to the Disabled or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 
for Aid to the Disabled, said sum to be taken from Free 
Cash. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
a sum for the adminstration of Aid to the Disabled or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $10.00 
for administration of Aid to the Disabled, said sum to be 
taken from Free Cash. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will accept as a public 
way, the private road known as Willarch Road, as shown 
on a plan recorded with South Middlesex Registry of 



24 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Deeds, Plan book 7558, plan 291 and approved by the 
Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln May 27, 1951. 

Voted: That subject to the receipt of a deed and ease- 
ment in form satisfactory to the Selectmen, the Town 
accept as a public way the private road known as Willarch 
Road as shown on a plan approved by the Planning Board 
May 29, 1951 and recorded in the South Middlesex Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds Plan Book 7558, Plan 291. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a 
Committee to make plans for the observance of the 200th 
anniversary of the Town's incorporation, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator appoint a committee of 
five which together with the Selectmen now in office shall 
constitute a committee of eight to prepare preliminary 
plans for the observance of the 200th anniversary of the 
Town, said Committee to report at the Annual Town 
Meeting in March 1953. 

Voted to adjourn at 7:55 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



TOWN MEETINGS 25 



Law Relating to Route 2 

Note : Article 15 of the March 1951 Town Meeting in- 
structed the Selectmen to support a statute like the fol- 
lowing", which became law on June 4, 1952. 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Office of the Secretary 
State House, Boston 33 

Edward J. Cronin, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 

June 10, 1952 

I hereby certify the Attached to be a True Photo- 
static Copy. 

Witness the Great Seal of the 

Commonwealth 

Edward J. Cronin, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 




CHAPTER 402 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Fifty-two. 
AN ACT Restricting the use of lands abutting the high- 
way known as Route 2 in the towns of Lincoln and 
Concord. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represent 
atives in General Court assembled, and by the authority 
of the same, as follows: Section 1. For the purpose of 
promoting the health, safety, convenience and welfare 
of the inhabitants of the Commonwealth, the use of the 



26 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

land in the Towns of Lincoln and Concord abutting- the 
highway now known as Route 2, and extending back for 
two hundred feet from either side line of said highway, is 
hereby restricted to such uses as are lawfully permitted 
therein under the respective zoning by-laws of said towns 
in effect immediately prior to the effective date of this act, 
such uses, however, to be subject to the restrictions of 
said by-laws. The restrictions in such by-laws in respect 
to the area of lots, frontage, the height and bulk of 
buildings, the set-back from the way fronted upon, and 
the width of side yards and rear yards in force immediate- 
ly prior to the effective date of this act, so far as applic- 
able to the land to which this act relates, shall remain in 
full force and effect. Section 2. This act shall become 
effective upon its acceptance at annual town elections held 
in the towns of Lincoln and Concord prior to April 
thirtieth, nineteen hundred and fifty-four. 

June 4, 1952 



ELECTIONS 27 

Annual Town Election 

Saturday, March 8, 1952 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the 
Annual Town Meeting, the meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator, the Ballot box was inspected, the 
following Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, Helen 
M. Dougherty, Bertha V. Bowles, Manley B. Boyce, 
William 0. Causer and D. Everett Sherman, Jr., and the 
Polls declared open at 12 o'clock Noon. Total number of 
Ballots cast 683 with the following result: 

Town Clerk (I Year) 

William H. Davis. „,..,„ 645 

Scattering - ., i 

Blanks « 37 

Selectman (3 Years) 

John O. Wilson 592 

Scattering- - 3 

Blanks - 8 8 



Assessor (3 Years) 

William C. Holmes .„ „ 280 

G. Arnold Wiley M „ 360 

Blanks 43 



Treasurer (I Year) 

Frederick B. Taylor 621 

Scattering - - 1 

Blanks - ~ 61 



Auditor (I Year) 

Pearson Hunt - 579 

Scattering ~ ~ 3 

Blanks -....- - 101 



28 town Government 

School Committee (3 Years) 

Ernest P. Neumann 405 

David F. Rogers 260 

Blanks 18 

Water Commissioner (3 Years) 

H enry Warner „ „ 557 

Scattering 3 

Blanks „ 123 

Board of Health (3 Years) 

Gordon A. Donaldson „ 619 

Blanks 6 4 

Tree Warden (I Year) 

John Cook .. 106 

Edward B. Cunningham „ 181 

Daniel A. Maclnnis „ 384 

Blanks „ 12 

Commissioner of Trust Funds (3 Years) 

Clement C. Sawtell „ 604 

Blanks 79 

Trustee of Bemis Fund (3 Years) 

Christopher W. Hurd „ 603 

Scattering .. 1 

Blanks :......:. 79 

Cemetery Commissioner 

James B. Billings 403 

Edward B. Cunningham 258 

Blanks 22 

Planning Board (5 Years) 

Arthur T. Howard 597 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 85 

Director of DeCordova Museum and Park (4 Years) 

John Q. Adams 607 

Blanks , .... *76 



ELECTIONS 29 



Presidential Primary 

April 29th, 1952 

Warrant 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Lincoln, 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town 
House, Tuesday, the twenty-ninth day of April, 1952, at 
12 o'clock noon, for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the follow- 
ing offices: 

10 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the 

Republican Party. 
10 Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Conven- 
tion of the Republican Party. 
16 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the 

Democratic Party. 
16 Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Conven- 
tion of the Democratic Party. 
2 District Delegates to the National Convention of the 

Republican Party. 5th Congressional District. 
2 Alternate District Delegates to the National Conven- 
tion of the Republican Party. 5th Congressional Dis- 
trict. 
4 District Delegates to the National Convention of the 

Democratic Party. 5th Congressional District. 
4 Alternate District Delegates to the National Conven- 
tion of the Democratic Party. 5th Congressional Dis- 
trict. 



30 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

District Members of State Committee— (One man and 
One Woman) for each political party for the 5th Mid- 
dlesex Senatorial District. 

20 Members of the Republican Town Committee. 

10 Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Presidential Preference. 

The polls will be open from 12 o'clock noon to seven 
P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this seventh day of April, A.D., 
1952. 

EDMUND W. GILES, 
J. 0. WILSON, 
HENRY DeC. WARD 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

On the reverse of the Warrant is the following: April 
18, 1952, I have served this Warrant by posting attested 
copies at both Post Offices and the Town Hall, seven days 
before the date of said Meeting. 

LEO J. ALGEO, Constable 

In acordance with the above Warrant the Polls were 
declared open at 12 o'clock Noon by Mr. John 0. Wilson, 
previously the ballot box had been inspected and the 
following Ballot Clerks duly sworn : Helena A. Dee, Helen 
Dougherty, Bertha V. Bowles, Manley B. Boyce, William 
0. Causer, and Howard Snelling. The Polls were declared 
closed at 7 P.M. by Mr. John 0. Wilson. Total vote 651, 
Republican 618, Democrat 33 8 

REPUBLICAN 

Delegates 

Lever ett Saltonstall 510 

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr 506 

Joseph William Martin, Ji\ 449 

Sinclair Weeks 465 



ELECTIONS 



31 



Katherine G. Howard. 

Daniel Tyler, Jr 

Robert S. Bradford 

Richard I. Furbush....... 

Charles Gibbons _. 

Clarence A. Barnes 

Blanks . — 



447 
447 
480 
460 
416 
415 
1,585 



Alternate Delegates 

Carroll L. Meins _ „ 435 

Maxwell M. Rabb _ - 434 

Basel Brewer 404 

John A. Volpe .. 432 

Julia B. Kirlin„ 432 

Esther W. Wheeler „ 430 

Louis Van N. Washburn. .. 434 

Robert C. Cochrane, Jr 426 

Jean L. Olmsted .. 400 

George W. Schryner 402 

Blanks I : 1,95 1 



District Delegates 
5th District 

Harris S. Richardson _ 

Otis M. Whitney 

Blanks 

Alternate Delegates 

Paul R. Achin 

Muriel S. Barnes 

Blanks - ~ 



407 
425 
404 



393 
392 
451 



Group Delegates 
Group 2 

Ralph H. Bonnell 65 

Robert H. W. Welch, Jr 64 

Blanks 1,107 

Alternate Delegates 

Edward J. DeSauliner, Jr _ „ 60 

Edith G. Gallant „ 59 

Blanks _ 1,117 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

State Committee Man 

Ernest C. Graves „ 148 

Herbert C. Harting „ „ 89 

John J. McCarthy, Jr 191 

Blanks - „ M 190 

State Committee Woman 

Marianne Harcourt „ 3 9 

Eleanor A. Pallotta 462 

Blanks 117 

Town Committee 

Anthony Faunce „.... 465 

Eleanor A. Pallotta . 494 

Robert W. Scott 474 

Arthur T. Howard 473 

Pauline K. Rice .. 469 

William H. Davis .. 507 

Gladys de Y. Herman . 479 

Alan McClennen 484 

Robert H. Thorson 463 

Kenneth W. Bergen 486 

D. Everett Sherman, Jr .. 480 

Walter E. Lovejoy 460 

William L. Grinnell 468 

Laura Thiessen ........ 461 

Charles K. Fitts - 489 

Eveleth R. Todd 506 

Chester Jones . 7 

James DeNormandie 77 

John White 88 

Elliott Grabill 2 

Leonard Rooney 72 

John Tew „ 7 2 

Scattering ~ 10 

Blanks „ 3,814 

Presidential Preference 

Eisenhower 475 

Taft ~ 93 

W. O. Douglass .. .. 1 

Stassen .. ..... 1 

Warren 3 

MacArthur 2 

Scattering .-. 1 

Blanks 42 



ELECTIONS 33 

DEMOCRATIC 

Delegates Group 

Paul A. Dever 17 

John W. McCormack...... 18 

Maurice J. Tobin .. 18 

John B. Hynes „ „ 18 

William J. Foley - ... . 18 

Henry Brides . . . 14 

J. William Belanger 17 

James M. Curley . . 16 

Margaret M. O'Riordan 19 

Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr . . 14 

John C. Carr * 1 6 

John E. Powers . 16 

Daniel E. Brunton . . 14 

Mary DePasquale Murray ~ 15 

Charles' I. Taylor 14 

John W. Codaire, Jr „ „ 14 



Alternate Delegates 

Edward A. Pecce 15 

J. Henry Goguen . 13 

Peter J. Levanti - 15 

James Leo O'Connor . 14 

Stanislaws G. Wondoloski . „ 14 

Edward F. Doolan 15 

Salvatore Cametio 15 

Paul F. Smith 1 3 

Charles Collatos. 1 4 

Elizabeth A. Stanton . 1 5 

Louis H. Glaser 13 

Helen J. Fay . 13 

Silas F. Taylor 13 

Francis H. Murray, Jr 14 

Thomas F. Graham 13 

Edith T. Wilcox 14 

Blanks 305 

District Delegates Group I 

Daniel F. Moriarty 13 

William C. Geary 12 

Edward P. Gilgun „ 12 

Daniel D. O'Dea 12 

Blanks 83 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Delegates Group 2 

Joseph W. Monohan, Jr 1 

James C. Menton .. 2 

John J. Curran .. .. 1 

Leo F. Garvey. 1 

Blanks - - 127 

Alternate Delegates 

John F. Finnerty 1 

Robert E. Mahoney .. 2 

John J. Sheehan .. - 1 

James A. Coffey. .. 1 

Blanks ., 127 

Delegates Not Grouped 

Thomas J. Corbett 

Cornelius F. Cronin . 

James A. Cullen , 

Mary Maloney Lynch 

Clara A. Gannon........ , 

Blanks „ 132 

Alternate Delegates Not Grouped 

Helen M. Fitzgerald Cullen 

Thomas H. McFadden 

Blanks 6 6 

State Committee Man 

Martin J. Hansberry „ 14 

Thomas F. Tracey 3 

Blanks 16 

State Committee Waman 

Alice D. Sullivan 16 

Blanks 17 

Town Committee 

H. A. Doherty 6 

Allen Dougherty 1 

Thomas Carney 7 

Edward Cunningham , 7 

Dennis Dougherty 7 

A. J. Dougherty 9 

Hope Hunt - 2 



ELECTIONS 



35 



Marion Billings ~ „.. 7 

Helen Dougherty ._ . — 8 

Scattering 4 

Blanks .. ; - 2 7 1 



Presidential Preference 

Douglas 7 

Harriman ~ 1 

Barkeley .. 1 

Kefauver .. 4 

Lodge 1 

Eisenhower 3 

Stevenson 3 

Truman 1 

Blanks 12 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



State Primary 

September 16th, 1952 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was 
called to order at 12 o'clock Noon by Mr. John 0. Wilson, 
previously the ballot box was inspected, the following 
Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, Helen M. 
Dougherty, Elizabeth J. Snelling, William 0. Causer, 
Manley B. Boyce, and D. Everett Sherman Jr., the Polls 
were declared closed at 7 o'clock P.M. by Mr. Edmund W. 
Giles with the following results : Total number of Ballots 
cast 563, Republican 526, Democratic 37. Total number 
of Rent Control Ballots cast 563. 





REPUBLICAN 




Governor 


Christian A. Herter 
Blanks 


500 
23 


Lieutenant Governor 


Sumner G. Whittier 
Blanks 


494 
32 


Secretary 


Beatrice Hancock Mullaney 

Scattering 

Blanks 


475 

1 

50 



36 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Treasurer 


Fred J. Burrell 


79 




Roy Charles Papalia 


430 




Blanks 


17 


Auditor 


David J. Mintz 


472 




Blanks 


54 


Attorney General 


George Fingold 


491 




Blanks 


35 


Senator in Congress 


Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. 


501 




Blanks 


25 


Congressman 5th District 


Edith Nourse Rogers 


488 




Scattering 


3 




Blanks 


35 


Councillor 3rd District 


Otis M. Whitney 


492 




Scattering 


1 




Blanks 


33 


Senator 


Richard I. Furbush 


491 


5th Middlesex District 


Blanks 


35 


Representative in 


Howard S. Russell 


490 


General Court 


Blanks 


36 


Clerk of Courts 


Charles T. Hughes 


371 


Middlesex County 


Charles E. Jellison 


67 




John F. Lombard 


52 




Blanks 


36 


Register of Deeds 


William B. Bailey 


128 


Middlesex Southern 


Arthur L. Harris 


250 


District 








Arlyn F. Hassett 


19 




Harold I. Hunt 


46 




Arthur S. Scipione 


23 




Blanks 


60 


County Commissioners (2) William G. Andrew 


298 




H. Herbert Applin 


203 


% 


L. Johnson Callas 


18 


Walter Francis Chapman 


17 




Edward F. Con very 


2 




Albert L. Daigle 


1 




S. H. Harding 


20 




Patrick J, Jennings 


11 




John W. Justice 


3 




Thomas P. Lane 


8 




Harold E. Lawson 


266 




Robert L. MacGregory 


8 




W. Edward Magiera 







Herbert Kenneth Noble 


30 




Maurice L. Spaulding 


18 



ELECTIONS 



37 





Ellis Sutcliffe 


11 




D. Paul Wormwood 


7 




Blanks 


131 


RENT CONTROL 


YES 


156 




NO 


385 




Blanks 


22 




DEMOCRATIC 




Governor 


Paul A. Dever 


18 




Blanks 


19 


Lieutenant Governor 


Charles Jeff Sullivan 


11 




Thomas B. Brennan 


4 




Edward C. Carroll 


1 




Thomas J. Kurey 


2 




C. Gerald Lucey 


7 




Joseph L. Murphy 


3 




Blanks 


9 


Secretary 


Edward J. Cronin 


23 




Blanks 


14 


Treasurer 


William R.' Conley 


2 




Cornelius P. Cronin" 


6 




James E. V. Donelan 


1 




Foster Furcolo 


15 




John F. Kennedy 







Jeremiah J. Murphy Jr. 


1 




Alexander Francis Sullivan 







Blanks 


6" 


Auditor 


Thomas J. Buckley 


24 




Blanks 


L3 


Attorney General 


Francis E. Kelly . . 


7 




Robert T. Capeless 


16 




George Leary 


7 




John V. Moran 


4 




Blanks 


o 


Senator in Congress 


John F. Kennedy 


27 




Blanks 


10 


Congressman 5th District 


Helen M. Fitzgerald Cullen 


18 




Blanks 


19 


Councillor 3rd District 


Daniel T. Carey 


4 




Joseph P. Duca 


3 




Donald B. Falvey Jr. 


11 




Edmund F. Haverty 


4 




Thomas C. Quinn 


2 




Blanks 


13 


Senator 


Charles A. Whalen 


19 


5th Middlesex District 


Blanks 


18 



38 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Representative in P. Joseph Murphy 20 

General Court Blanks 17 

Cleric of Courts Joseph V. Carroll 1 

Middlesex County Edward J. Crane 3 

John F. Ferrick 4 

Frederick T. McDermott 4 

Clement Gregory McDonough 2 

Edward J. Sullivan 7 

John F. Sullivan 1 

Blanks 15 

Register of Deeds James G. Bagley 3 

Middlesex Southern George H. Boyle Jr. 

District William P. Crowley 2 

James F. Fitzgerald 11 

Thomas A. Hagerty 

Clarence E. Lord 

Paul V. Shaughnessy 9 

Blanks 12 

County Commissioners (2) James A. Cullen 13 

Patrick J. Brennan 4 

Henry F. Buckley 

James H. Burns 2 

Theodore Campo 1 

James M. Cook 1 

Benjamin Watkins Corey 5 

Edward J. Coughlin 1 

Charles Cullinane 1 

James W. Donahue 3 

Emile A. Dumas 3 

Vincent A. Errichetti 

Eugene X. Giroux 1 

Gordon F. Hughes 2 

Andrew V, Kelleher 4 

Francis R. King 1 

John L, Mallett 

Gertrude S. McManug 7 

John F. Mullin 

Charles Joseph Murphy 1 

William H. Murphy 

Francis H. Murray Jr. 1 

Andrew J. Rogers 1 

Edward H, Sullivan 1 

Blanks 2] 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



ELECTIONS 39 



State Election 

November 4th, 1952 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Polls were 
declared open at 7 o'clock A. M. by Mr. John 0. 
Wilson, Warden. Previously the ballot box was in- 
spected and Elizabeth J. Snelling and Helena A. Dee 
duly sworn as Ballot Clerks. At 8 o'clock A.M. the 
following* Ballot Clerks were duly sworn: Helen M. 
Dougherty, Manley B. Boyce, D. Everett Sherman Jr. 
and William 0. Causer. At 1 o'clock the following were 
duly sworn as Ballot Clerks: Marion B. Billings, Mar- 
garet M. Algeo, Sadie Sherman and Bertha V. Bowles. 
Mr. Henry De C. Ward took over the duties of Warden, 
followed by Mr. Edmund W. Giles at 5:15 P.M. The Polls 
were declared closed by the latter at 8 o'clock P.M. Total 
vote 1,432. 

STATE ELECTION 

Electors of President and Vice President 

Eisenhower and Nixon — Republican 1079 

Hallinan and Bass — Peace Progressive 3 

Hamblem and Holtwick — Prohibition 

Hass and Emery — Socialist Labor 1 

Stevenson and Sparkman — Democratic 335 

' Blanks 1 4 

Governor 

Paul A. Dever — Democratic 315 

Christian A. Herter — Republican 1089 

Lawrence Gilfedder — Socialist Labor 1 

Florence H. Luscomb — Peace Progressive 5 

Guy S. Williams — Prohibition 

Blanks 22 

Lieutenant Governor 

Charles F. Jeff Sullivan — Democratic 272 

Sumner G. Whittier — Republican 1113 

William R. Ferry — Prohibition :{ 

Francis A. Votano — Socialist Labor :j 

Blanks 41 



40 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Secretary 

Edward J. Cronin — Democratic „ 295 

Beatrice Hancock Mullaney — Republican 1072 

Alice M. Ferry — Prohibition 6 

Fred M. Ingersoll — Socialist Labor 3 

Blanks „ „ „ 56 

Treasurer 

Foster Furcolo — Democratic 277 

Roy Charles Papalia — Republican 1100 

Henning A. Blomen — Socialist Labor „ 3 

Harold J. Ireland — Prohibition 1 

Blanks „ 5 1 

Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley — Democratic 339 

David J. Mintz — Republican „ 1033 

Anthony Martin — Socialist Labor 1 

Robert A. Simmons — Prohibition 2 

Blanks 57 

Attorney General 

Francis E. Kelly — Democratic 188 

George Fingold — Republican „ 1197 

Arthur W. Blomen — Socialist Labor „ 1 

Howard B. Rand — Prohibition 3 

Blanks „ 43 

Senator in Congress 5th District 

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. — Republican 1049 

John F. Kennedy — Democratic 360 

Thelma Ingersoll — Socialist Labor „ 1 

Mark R. Shaw — Prohibition 2 

Blanks 2 

Congressman 5th District 

Edith Nourse Rogers — Republican 1132 

Helen M. Fitzgerald Cullen — Democratic 225 

Miriam S. Hall — Prohibition 9 

Blanks - - 66 

Councillor 3rd District 

Otis M. Whitney — Republican „ 1191 

Thomas C. Quinn — Democratic - 194 

Blanks - 47 



ELECTIONS 41 

Senator 5th Middlesex District 

Richard I. Furbush — Republican 1144 

Charles A. Whalen — Democratic 238 

Blanks - - 50 

Representative in General Court I Oth Middlesex District 

Howard S. Russell — Republican „ 1114 

P. Joseph Murphy — Democratic 270 

Blanks ........ ; 48 

Clerk of Courts Middlesex County 

Charles T. Hughes — '.Republican 1100 . 

Edward J. Sullivan — -Democratic... ,. 269 

Blanks ^.........„:;.....;......„..... 63 

Register of Deeds Middlesex Southern District 

William B. Bailey — Republican...... 1062 

James F. Fitzgerald — Democratic 304 

Scattering ... 1 

Blanks ....»;.,.., „..,..,.....,....„...., „..* 65 

County Commissioners Middlesex County 

William G. Andrew — Republican .. 1068 

James A. Cullen — Democratic 261 

H. Herbert Applin — Republican 821 

Patrick J. Brennan — Democratic .. « 211 

Blanks 503 



QUESTION 

..Yes - 234 

No 994 

Blanks 204 

.Yes 265 

No 944 

Blanks „ 223 

•Yes _ 397 

No 84 J 

Blanks ly | 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Licenses 

Total number of Dog Licenses issued during the year 
1952, 397; namely, 234 Male, 61 Female, 100 Spayed 
Female and 2 Kennel for which the sum of $913.60 has 
been paid to the Treasurer. 

Sporting, etc., issued during the year 1952; Fishing 
84, Hunting 56, Sporting 43, Minor Fishing 8, Female 
Fishing 16, Non Resident Special Fishing 2, Non Resident 
Hunting 1, Non Resident Military 2, Duplicate 3, for 
which the sum of $700.00 has been paid to the Division 
of Fisheries and Game, 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



Note: For vital statistics (births, marriages, and 
deaths see Appendix.) 



^ 



LYiance 



Report of State and Town Auditors 

The work of the State Auditor in 1952 consisted, a \ 
usual, of a thorough check of the Town's financial rec- 
ords for the preceding year, 1951, and the preparation 
of a statement of the Town's financial condition at the 
beginning of the year 1952. The Town Auditor par- 
ticipated in this work as an observer for part of the 
time that the records were being examined in Lincolr, 
and the trust fund securities were being examined in 
Boston. 

The statutes provide that the "substance" of the State 
Auditor's report be published. In the Town Auditor's 
opinion, this substance is contained in the material re- 
produced below, consisting of a portion of the text, writ- 
ten by the State Auditor, and the Balance Sheet of the 
Town, prepared by the State Auditor but condensed by 
the Town Auditor. This shows the Town's condition at 
the beginning of 1952. 

The State Auditor's report contains many details which 
are not reproduced below because the differences be- 
tween these details and those reported by Town officia s 
are, in the Town Auditor's opinion, of minor important 
The detailed tables are available for public inspection 
at the Selectmen's office. 



44 FINANCE 

Last year it was pointed out that the Town could look 
forward to an increase in its Surplus Revenue (or "free 
cash") when the State of Massachusetts paid accrued 
installments of financial aid for the building constructed 
in 1948. These payments had not been received by De- 
cember 31, 1952, so five annual installments will be due 
in 1953. The total sum so due is estimated at about 
$23,000. This does not appear on the Balance Sheet. 



PEARSON HUNT, Town Auditor 



January 15, 1953. 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the Town of Lincoln for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1951, and report thereon as follows: 

The records of charges against appropriations as kept 
by the Board of Selectmen were analyzed and checked 
with the Town Clerk's records of appropriations and 
loan authorizations voted by the Town meetings and 
with the transfers authorized from the reserve fund 
by the Finance Committee. Ledger accounts were com- 
piled, and a balance sheet, which is appended to this 
report, was prepared showing the financial condition of 
the Town on December 31, 1951. 

The books and accounts of the Town treasurer were 
examined and checked in detail. 

The cash book additions were verified, and the cash 
balance on February 11, 1952, was proved by recon- 
ciliation of the bank balances with statements furnished 



AUDITORS 45 

by the banks of deposit, by examination of the savings 
bank books and United States Treasury bills, and by 
actual count of the cash in the office. 

The payments made for maturing debt and interest 
were verified by comparison with the cancelled securities 
and coupons on file and with the amounts falling due. 

The income, disbursements, and all other trust fund 
transactions were verified, and the cash balances were 
proved by reconciliation with statements furnished by 
the banks in which these funds are deposited. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. 

The records of departmental and water accounts re- 
ceivable were examined and checked. 

The outstanding tax, excise, departmental, and water 
accounts were verified by mailing notices to a number 
of persons whose names appeared on the books as owing 
money to the Town, and the replies received thereto in- 
dicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The financial accounts of the Town Clerk were ex- 
amined and checked for dog and sporting licenses issued. 

The surety bonds of the various Town officials required 
by law to furnish them were examined and found to be 
in proper form. 

The records of the boards of Selectmen and health, of 
the wire, plumbing, and building inspectors, and of the 
school and library departments, as well as of all other 
departments collecting money for the Town or committing 
bills for collection, were examined and checked. 

In addition to the balance sheet, there are appended 
to this report tables showing a reconciliation of the 
Treasurer's and the Collector's cash, summaries of the 
tax, motor vehicle and trailer excise, tax title, depart- 
mental, and water accounts, as well as tables showing 
the transactions and condition of the trust and invest- 
ment funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(s) HERMAN B. DINE, 

Assistant Director of Accounts. 



46 



FINANCE 



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LYlClYLCe 



Report of State and Town Auditors 

The work of the State Auditor in 1952 consisted, a ". 
usual, of a thorough check of the Town's financial rec- 
ords for the preceding year, 1951, and the preparation 
of a statement of the Town's financial condition at the 
beginning of the year 1952. The Town Auditor par- 
ticipated in this work as an observer for part of the 
time that the records were being examined in Lincolr, 
and the trust fund securities were being examined in 
Boston. 

The statutes provide that the "substance" of the State 
Auditor's report be published. In the Town Auditor';^ 
opinion, this substance is contained in the material re- 
produced below, consisting of a portion of the text, writ- 
ten by the State Auditor, and the Balance Sheet of the 
Town, prepared by the State Auditor but condensed by 
the Town Auditor. This shows the Town's condition at 
the beginning of 1952. 

The State Auditor's report contains many details which 
are not reproduced below because the differences be- 
tween these details and those reported by Town officia s 
are, in the Town Auditor's opinion, of minor importance 
The detailed tables are available for public inspection 
at the Selectmen's office. 



44 FINANCE 

Last year it was pointed out that the Town could look 
forward to an increase in its Surplus Revenue (or "free 
cash") when the State of Massachusetts paid accrued 
installments of financial aid for the building constructed 
in 1948. These payments had not been received by De- 
cember 31, 1952, so five annual installments will be due 
in 1953. The total sum so due is estimated at about 
$23,000. This does not appear on the Balance Sheet. 

PEARSON HUNT, Town Auditor 
January 15, 1953. 



Mr. Francis X. Lang 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

State House, Boston 

» 
Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the Town of Lincoln for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1951, and report thereon as follows : 

The records of charges against appropriations as kept 
by the Board of Selectmen were analyzed and checked 
with the Town Clerk's records of appropriations and 
loan authorizations voted by the Town meetings and 
with the transfers authorized from the reserve fund 
by the Finance Committee. Ledger accounts were com- 
piled, and a balance sheet, which is appended to this 
report, was prepared showing the financial condition of 
the Town on December 31, 1951. 

The books and accounts of the Town treasurer were 
examined and checked in detail. 

The cash book additions were verified, and the cash 
balance on February 11, 1952, was proved by recon- 
ciliation of the bank balances with statements furnished 



AUDITORS 45 

by the banks of deposit, by examination of the savings 
bank books and United States Treasury bills, and by 
actual count of the cash in the office. 

The payments made for maturing debt and interest 
were verified by comparison with the cancelled securities 
and coupons on file and with the amounts falling due. 

The income, disbursements, and all other trust fund 
transactions were verified, and the cash balances were 
proved by reconciliation with statements furnished by 
the banks in which these funds are deposited. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. 

The records of departmental and water accounts re- 
ceivable were examined and checked. 

The outstanding tax, excise, departmental, and water 
accounts were verified by mailing notices to a number 
of persons whose names appeared on the books as owing 
money to the Town, and the replies received thereto in- 
dicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The financial accounts of the Town Clerk were ex- 
amined and checked for dog and sporting licenses issued. 

The surety bonds of the various Town officials required 
by law to furnish them were examined and found to be 
in proper form. 

The records of the boards of Selectmen and health, of 
the wire, plumbing, and building inspectors, and of the 
school and library departments, as well as of all other 
departments collecting money for the Town or committing 
bills for collection, were examined and checked. 

In addition to the balance sheet, there are appended 
to this report tables showing a reconciliation of the 
Treasurer's and the Collector's cash, summaries of the 
tax, motor vehicle and trailer excise, tax title, depart- 
mental, and water accounts, as well as tables showing 
the transactions and condition of the trust and invest- 
ment funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(s) HERMAN B. DINE, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 



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48 FINANCE 



Treasurer's Report 

During 1952 a total of $387,000 of General Funds of 
the Town were received from many sources. The largest 
items were : 

Taxes paid by owners of property in Lincoln $261,000 

State and Federal welfare subsidies 32,000 

Lincoln's share of State Corporation and 

personal Income Taxes 33,000 

State aid for School expenses $31,000 

Expenditures for 1952 (exclusive of school construction 
payments) totalled $370,000 The major expenditure 
items were: 

School operations $148,000 

Highways 48,000 

Debt maturities and interest 47,00(> : 

Welfare aid 41,000 

Despite the appropriation of $36,000 from Surplus by 
the Town for 1952 expenditures our Surplus at the end 
of 1952 was higher than a year earlier, totaling over 
$118,000, of which approximately $96,000 was "Avail- 
able Surplus" (free cash). This was due to substantially 
larger receipts than had been estimated, when setting 
the tax rate — more Motor Vehicle Excise taxes, State 
and Federal aid, interest income, etc. Also certain un- 
needed Reserves were transferred to Surplus by Town 
vote, and $7,000 of departmental appropriations were not 
spent. ; ". 

For several years a considerable portion of our Surplus 
has been deposited in savings banks. Since this policy 
was adopted nearly $10,000 of interest has accumulated 
in these accounts of which $2,000 was earned in .1952. 
Also in 1952 about $2,700 income was earned by keep m 
much of the unspent portions of the -School- Addition. bor- 
rowing in U. S. Treasury bills, " : L 



DP 



TREASURER 49 

The exact amounts of receipts, expenditures and the 
year-end balance sheet follows. All figures are subject to 
adjustment by the State auditors. 

Several years ago the State adopted an assistance pro- 
gram for towns faced with new school building require- 
ments. Provided the new facilities meet the standards 
set up by the School Building Assistance Commission, a 
portion of the gross cost is paid by the State. Both the 
New School and the Addition have been approved as 
qualifying The State subsidy is not paid in a lump sum 
but is spread over the period of borrowing entered into 
by the Town to provide the funds to build. Due to various 
delays the necessary documents covering the New School 
did not get to the Commission until late in 1952 where 
they are now being checked. We should receive in the 
next few weeks the amounts for 1949 - 1952 inclusive, 
and later this year the 1953 installment The annual in- 
stallment will exceed $4,000 Eventually we will receive 
nearly as much again on account of the School Addition. 

The volume of work in handling the Town's finances is 
substantial. Unlike many towns Lincoln has no Town 
Accountant, and all accounting services are provided 
through the Treasurer's Office. In 1952 nearly 4,000 
checks were drawn and distributed. Some 87 separate 
commercial and savings bank accounts were maintained 
for General Funds, the Water Department, the Cemetery 
Commissioners, 36 Cemetery Perptual Care Funds, and 
19 trust funds. Approximately 140 persons received com- 
pensation from the Town and payroll records including 
withholding taxes, retirement funds and Blue Cross were 
handled for these persons. Innumerable reports of va- 
rious kinds were prepared and submitted to Town, County 
and State officials in addition to the usual amount of con- 
ferences and correspondence. All this work was accom- 
plished by two part-time persons with a small amount 
of extra clerical help. 

FREDERICK B. TAYLOR, Treasurer 



50 FINANCE 



Treasurer's Report, Calendar Year 1952 

January 1, Balance $489,383.84 

Receipts 

Anti-Rabies Dog- Clinic 76.00 

B oar d of Appeals 110.00 

Board of Health 431.80 

Cemetery, Digging Graves 363.00 

City of Cambridge, Taxes 730.39 

C ollector of Taxes 261,525.81 

Interest and Costs „ 270.45 

C oncord C ourt Fines 278.55 

deCordova School Equipment Trust Fund Income 705.70 

deCordova, audit refund.. 100.00 

Highways, Local „ _ 50.15 

Machinery 200.00 

Inspectors, Building, Plumbing and Wiring 488.50 

Interest on Deposits - 4,868.0 1 

Library Fines - 305.00 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

Chapter 90, 1951 - $5,995.62 

1952 999.04 

Income Tax „ 14,052.77 

Corporation Tax. 19,086.73 

Highways, Snow Removal 263.25 

Licenses 8.00 

Old Age Assistance 17,401.91 

a/c Loss of Taxes 545.23 

Meals Tax 1,332.69 

School Aid, Ch 70 17,801.19 

H. S. Transportation.. 12,915.50 

Tuition of Children 633.12 

Veterans' Benefits 276.25 



91,311.30 

Miscellaneous, Licenses, etc 117.50 

Middlesex County, Dog Tax 736.13 

Care and Killing of Dogs 149.50 

Highways, Chapter 90 4,496.83 

Old Age Assistance Refunds 1,740.01 

Recovery 2,059.79 

Planning Board 18.00 



TREASURER 51 

Schools, Grammar School Fund Income 34.26 

T uition „ 352.00 

Damage 88.00 

Miscellaneous 19.50 

Town Clerk, Dog Licenses .. 913.60 

Town Hall Rentals - - 61.00 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance 13,803.01 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance Adm „ 581.52 

U.S.A. Aid to Disabled 90.00 

U.S.A. Aid to Disabled Adm 1.16 



Total Receipts $876,460.31 

Payments 

Selectmen's Orders (see detail) $654,487.67 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

State Parks and Reservations 541.29 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 488.33 

Middlesex County: 

1952 Tax 11,324.76 

Dog Licenses 910.00 

Tuberculosis Hospital 2,237.36 



Total Payments $669,989.41 

Balance in Banks 206,470.90 



$876,460.31 



52 



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60 FINANCE 



GENERAL FUND, DECEMBER 31, 1952 

Assets 

Concord National Bank $40,270.82 

Day Trust Company 85,653.12 

First National Bank of Boston 3,708.82 

Arlington Five Cents Savings Bank 4,626.59 

Belmont Savings Bank 4,254.52 

Beverly Savings Bank 4,419.27 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 4,136.45 

Brockton Savings Bank 4,569.52 

Brookline Savings Bank 2,319.04 

Cambridge Savings Bank 4,849.16 

Charlestown Savings Bank 5,121.56 

East Bridgewater Savings Bank 4,577.00 

Franklin Savings Bank „ 4,695.91 

H ome Savings Bank 4,661.20 

Institution for Savings in Roxbury 4,609.33 

Lowell Institution for Savings 2,262.23 

Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank 4,634.06 

Maiden Savings Bank 2,297.79 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bank 1,3 83.93 

Newton Savings Bank „ 4 695.94 

North Avenue Savings Bank 2,346.86 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,839.37 

Whitman Savings Bank 4,738.41 

$206,470.90 

Taxes, Interest to be Added $13,439.67 

Accounts Receivable: 

. State and County, Chapter 90 ... 4,991.85 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts @ O.A.A 3,012.78 

Total Assets .'. $227,915.20 



Liabilities and Surplus 

Dog licenses, due County $5.40 

Old Age Assistance recovery, due others 2,059.79 

Road Machinery Fund 1,466.26 

Federal grants for public welfare: 

Old Age Assistance $8,277.19 

Old Age Assistance Administration 82.90 

Aid to Dependent Children 115.31 



TREASURER til 

Aid to Dependent Children Admin- 
istration 4.23 

Aid to Disabled - 90.00 

Aid to Disabled Administration .. .02 8,569.65 

Grammar School Fund income 34.26 

deCordova School Equipment Fund 

income ~ 705.70 

Overlay Reserves: 

1951 .. - $241.70 

1952 .. ... 2,163.91 2,405.61 

Unexpended appropriation balances: 

Elm Tree removal $1,998.50 

Civil Defense 627.45 

Chapter 90 highway construction 3,352.90 

New School construction 318.88 

School Addition construction 68,267.95 

■ Cemetery improvements 885.42 

Town Report Committee 100.00 

Preservation of Town records 150.00 

Building Code Committee .. 195.25 

Revision of Town By-Laws 150.00 

Speed zoning 215.71 

Union Health District Committee 100.00 

Land damages, Wildes „ „ 1,500.00 

Fire station site .. - «. 3,000.00 80,862.06 

Overlay Surplus 13,638.33 

General Funds Surplus: 

Receivables reserved until collected $21,444.30 

Available Surplus ("free cash") „ 96,723.84 118,168.14 



Total Reserves and Surplus $227,915.20 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$160,000 School Building Loan, 1 % % , due $10,000 
each December 1, 1953 - 1968, issued un- 
der Chapter 208, Acts of 1948. 

70,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $5,000 
each December 1, 1953 - 1958, and $4,000 
each December 1, 1959-1968, issued un- 
der Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 

24,000 Highway Equipment Building Loan, 1 % %, 
due $4,000 each December 1, 1953 - 1958, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws as 
amended. 



62 FINANCE 

237,000 School Building" Loan, 1%%, due $13,000 
each December 1, 1953 - 1961, and $12,- 
000 each December 1, 1962 - 1971, issued 
under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 
80,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $5,000 
each December 1, 1953 - 1956, and $4,000 
each December 1, 1957 - 1971, issued un- 
der Chapter 44, General Laws as amended. 



SCHOOL MILK FUND 

Balance January 1, 1952 $175.52 

Receipts ...: .. 1,728.87 



$1,904.39 
Payments . 1,630. 1 6 



December 31, 1952, Balance on Deposit $274.23 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Balance January 1, 1952 $129.07 

Receipts ............ 70.93 



$200.00 
Payments 100.00 



December 31, 1952, Balance on Deposit $100.00 

WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1952 

January 1, Balance 6,095.08 

Receipts 
Operating: 

Rates, 1950 . . . $100.00 

Rates, 1951 .... „ ...... 729.60 

Meter, 1951 . , 14.58 

Rates, 1952 . 21,128.02 

Meter, 1952 669.27 

Water Connections .. 2,475.00 

Rent of Hydrants 3,135.00 

Miscellaneous 114.00 

- ." 28,365.47 

$34,460.55 



TREASURER 63 

Expenses 

Salaries .. $4,725.00 

Labor 4,958.10 

Meters - 7,814.71 

Equipment 2,717.09 

Supplies and Maintenance .. 6,993.24 

Services and Equipment Rental 1,325.24 

Power - - 2,701.86 

Miscellaneous 387.29 

Legal and Engineering- 25.00 

Stickel Suit „ 1,750.00 

33,397.53 

December 31, Balance on Deposit. 1,063.02 



$34,460.55 
FREDERICK B. TAYLOR, Treasurer 

CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Receipts of 1952: 

Proceeds of sale of Cemetery lots $535.00 

Interest on savings bank deposit 186.22 



$721.22 
Less amount deposited in Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 535.00 



Cash balance at December 31, 1952 $186.22 

Savings Bank Deposit at December 31, 1952 

Middlesex Institution for Savings $7,150.99 



64 















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66 FINANCE 



Assessor's Report 

The Board feels that the citizens of the Town would 
appreciate a general statement as to how their property 
is valued for assessment purposes. 

For many years the Board has used a system of com- 
parison with one ultimate objective — that every build- 
ing and parcel of land be fairly assessed in ratio to the 
other property in Town. Though "sound'' or "market" 
value is not the sole guide, it will be noted that assess- 
ments run somewhere in the vicinity of 30% of sale value 
—a figure lower than in surrounding towns. Due consider- 
ation is given to type of construction, quality, age, condi- 
tion, location and other factors. A card file is maintained 
listing this and other pertinent information such as Reg- 
istry of Deeds book and page numbers, room count, and 
comparative houses. The Board is constantly improving 
this file. In recent years under-assessed properties have 
been raised and over-assessed properties lowered. This 
procedure will continue until, in the opinion of the Board, 
every property is valued in proper relation to every 
other. 

To help clarify the Table of Aggregates the Board 
makes note of the following : 

1. Under Real Estate, $43,100.00 is levied against the 
North Eastern Gas Transmission Co. 

2. Under Personal Estate, Stock in Trade, $143,666.00 
is levied against Boston Edison Co., and $85,000,00 
against Boston Consolidated Gas Co. 

3. Under Personal Estate, all other Tangible Personal 
Property, $64,650.00 is levied against New England 
Tel. & Tel. Co. 

4. Under Personal Estate, Machinery, $450.00 is 
against New England Tel. & Tel. Co., and $2,800.00 

against Western Union. 






ASSESSORS 67 

Thus it can be seen that, after removing the above 
public utilities, the Town has very little assessed per- 
sonal property. 

Attention is called to the following items : 

1. All real estate and personal property abatement 
requests must be filed by October 1st of the year 
in question, according to law. 

2. The Board meets regularly the first Tuesday of 
every month in the Town House, at 8:00 P.M. 

3. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of 
the Purple Heart award, and others, may qualify 
for a tax exemption. Please contact the Board to 
see if you qualify. 

The Board extends its sincere appreciation to the 
citizens of the Town for the spirit in which they have 
received our visits which, of necessity, often come at 
inconvenient times. The Board welcomes any helpful 
comments and urges all property owners to feel free to 
discuss their assessments at any regular meeting. 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, Jr., Chairman 
ARTHUR W RICE, Jr. 
G. ARNOLD WILEY 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report 
for the year 1952 : 

Computation of Tax Rate 

Total Town appropriation to be raised 

by Taxation - $346,184.25 

Total appropriation to be taken from 

available funds in 1951 53,675.00 

in 1952 49,438.09 

State Parks and Reservations 497.08 

State Audit of Municipal Accounts 439.70 

County Tax - 13,248.69 

1951 underestimate 458.44 



08 FINANCE 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 3,004.21 

1951 underestimate 526.07 

Overlay of current year . 5,419.70 

Gross amount to be raised $472,891.23 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

Income Tax $21,055.15 

C orporation Taxes 11,195.60 

Reimbursement on account of publicly 

owned land 529.40 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 25,000.00 

Old Age Tax (Meals) 629.14 

General Government 1,000.00 

Protection of Persons and Property 300.00 

Health and Sanitation „ 600.00 

Charities „ 1,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 17,000.00 

Schools 8,500.00 

Libraries 200.00 

Water 38,779.00 

Cemeteries 500.00 

Interest 1,900.00 

State Assistance for School 

. Construction :. 4,500.00 

City of Cambridge, Tax ............ ' 700.00 

Amount voted to be taken from free 

cash in 1951 : .:.......... 53,675.00 

in 1952 49,438.09 

Overestimates of previous year 57.42 

Net amount to be raised by Taxation $236,558.80 

Poll Tax.. ... $1,560.00 

Personal Property Tax.. .......[....... ......:..... 18,553.50 

Real Estate Tax 216,218.93 

$236,332.43 

Table of Aggregates 

Number of Persons Assessed: 

On Personal Estate only........... 54 

On Real Estate only 692 

On both Personal and Real Estate 32 

Total number of persons assessed 778 

Number of Polls assessed 780 

Value of assessed Personal Estate Stock 

in Trade..:..;.........:. $235,566 



ASSESSORS 69 

Machinery 46,125 

Live Stock 63,359 

All other Tangible Personal Property 67,250 
Total value of assessed Personal Estate $412,300.00 

Value of assessed Real Estate Land 1,112,300.00 

Buildings exclusive of Land 3,692.565.00 

Total value of assessed Real Estate 4,804,865.00 

Total valuation of assessed Estate $5,217,165.00 

Tax Rate per $1,000.00 $45.00 

Number of Live Stock assessed: 

Horses (1 year or over) 41 

Cows (1 year or over) 217 

Heifers 84 

Swine 400 

Sheep 6 

Fowl 5,119 

All other 6 

Number of Acres of Land assessed 8,271.91 

Number of Dwelling Houses assessed 678.00 

NOTE: For the Valuation List January 1, 1952, see Appendix. 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, Jr., Chairman 
ARTHUR W. RICE 
G. ARNOLD WILEY 



70 . FINANCE 



Report of Commissioners of Trust Funds 

For the information of those reading this report, the 
investment of Town Trust Funds under the supervision 
of the Trust Fund Commissioners is now restricted by- 
law to certain types of savings deposits and bonds or 
notes legal for savings banks in Massachusetts. 

The present securities held in the Town Trust Funds, 
in the opinion of the Commissioners, were purchased in 
conformity with the law. They reflect the rates prevail- 
ing on legal securities during the war years, and the 
recent purchase of some legal securities other than 
United States Government Bonds. 

As the pattern of interest rates becomes established 
and as opportunity presents, the Commissioners will con- 
sider the propriety of withdrawing savings bank de- 
posits or selling United States Government issues and 
purchasing with the proceeds legal corporation bonds 
to improve income. 

At the April 16, 1952, meeting of the Commissioners 
the sum of one hundred dollars was appropriated from 
the income of the Donald Gordon Recreation Fund to- 
wards the cost of a band for the Fourth of July cele- 
bration and twenty-five dollars for Fourth of July prizes. 
Of this amount only $26.25 was spent by the Fourth of 
July Committee, and the balance remains in the Donald 
Gordon Recreation Fund income account. 

On the request of the Committee to improve the Town 
Report, the Commissioners have included under certain 
of the individual funds a few words describing their 
purpose. The balance of the Commissioners' report will 
be found in the statistical section at page 233. A brief 
summary of these figures, prepared by the Town Auditor, 
appears on a following page. 

The Commissioners are mindful of the fact that a 
digest is incomplete, frequently misleading, and at best 
a poor substitute for the original instrument to which 
the reader in each case is referred. 



TRUST FUNDS 71 

Summary of Purposes of Trust Funds 

Managed by the Commissioners of Trust Funds 

Town of Lincoln, 1952 • 

NOTE: The full text of the controlling- documents can be found 
in the Town publication, "Wills and Deeds", which is 
available at the Town House. 

John H. Pierce, Hospital and Park 

Decreed October 8, 1947, that the Town of Lincoln is author- 
ized to use the income as follows : 

(a) So much thereof as the Selectmen shall consider advisable 

for maintenance for (Pierce) park purposes; 

(b) Prom the remainder provide hospital treatment for such 

inhabitants of Lincoln as the Selectmen deem deserv- 
ing; 

(c) From the remainder thereof to provide such medical and 

nursing care and treatment as the Board of Health 
of the Town may recommend and the Selectmen ap- 
prove for such inhabitants of Lincoln as the Select- 
men deem deserving, including dental care and treat- 
ment for school children, etc. 
(See Decree of Court) 

Abbie J. Stearns, Aid to the Silent Poor 

". . . the interest and income shall be paid over (not to Town 
paupers) but* to that class of honest temperate men and women 
who work hard or are prudent and economical and yet find it 
difficult to make both ends meet." 
(See Will) 

Julian de Cordova, School Equipment 

The income to be available for providing and maintaining equip- 
ment for public schools in the Town. 
(See Indenture dated April 27, 1936) 

Joseph Brooks, Grammar School* 

"Lincoln, April 10, 1761. The Legacy given by Mr. Joseph 
Brooks to the Town of Lincoln the interest thereof to be im- 
proved for the maintenance of a school in the Town, the prin- 
cipal upon April 10, 1761, being £388-10-5." 

Charles S. Smith, High School Building 

. toward the building of a new schoolhouse on or in con- 
nection with land heretofore given by me to the Town. Said 
building shall provide accommodations for a high school 
(See Will) 



72 FINANCE 

George F. Bemis, Lecture 

". . . the income of which shall be used to provide an annual 
course of public lectures in said Hall (the Town House) of an 
instructive and elevating character . . ." 
(See Will) 

Donald Gordon, Recreation 

". . . the annual net income thereof to be expended for the 
recreation or amusement of the townspeople." 
(See letter June 28, 1923) 

Library 

Julia A. Bemis — for the use of the Library, especially salaries. 
Elizabeth and Leland Burr Memorial — for the purchase of 

books. 
Ogden Codman — for the use of the Library. 
Hugh Anthony Gaskill Memorial — for children's books. 
Hattie Hoar Howard — for the use of the Library. 
David W. Mann — for the use of the Library. 
John H. Pierce — for augmenting salaries. 
George Russell — for the use of the Library. 
Abbie J. Stearns — for the purchase of books. 
Abbie J. Stearns, special for the purchase of books. 
C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler — for the purchase of books, 
George G. Tarbell — for the purchase of books. 



TRUST FUNDS 



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74 FINANCE 



Finance Committee 
Recommendations for 1953 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town 
appropriate for general purposes the several separately 
numbered items detailed in the list attached hereto 
aggregating $385,015. 

This aggregate of $385,015. recommended compares 
with total expenditures for similar general purposes in 
1952 of $339,298. an increase of $45,717. or 13.47%. 

The Committee also recommends an appropriation of 
$28,475. to be taken from the Water Works Treasury for 
the Water Department, a reduction of $4,923. from the 
expenditures for 1952. 

A comparison between the actual expenditures in 1952 
for the ten major categories into which our expenditures 
are divided, and the sums recommended by our Commit- 
tee for those purposes for 1953, shows that seven of them 
need more and three need less than was spent last year. 
Education (schools and library), of course, shows the 
greatest increase and is the only category in which the 
increase exceeds $1,500. 

As was to be expected, schools show the greatest in- 
crease in the specific appropriation recommended for 1953 
over the 1952 expenditures, namely, $47,207. or 31.79%. 
The following is a more detailed breakdown. 

Expended Recommended 

1952 1953 Increase % 

Salary $83,716. $104,333. $20,617. 24.63 

Transportation 18,584. 28,689. 10,105. 35.22 

Tuition and 

Vocational Ed 27,233. 31,875. 4,642. 17.04 

Equip., Supplies and 

Miscellaneous 18,938. 30,781. 11,843. 62.54 

Total ~ $148,471. $195,678. $47,207. 31.79 

Since every additional $5,200. of appropriations to be 
raised by taxation adds $1 to the tax rate, it is perhaps 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 75 

fortunate for our 1953 rate that a substantial drop in 
expenditures for highways and citizens aid is expected, 
that a large part of the increase for school transportation 
will be refunded by the State, and that the first State 
reimbursement for upwards of 20 per cent of the school 
bonds (first issue) which have been paid, is expected soon. 
However, it is doubtful if the peak of school expenses 
has yet been reached. The breaks in favor of our tax 
rate for 1953 are of a non-recurring nature. 

The following table shows the trend in the last few 
years of the percentage figures that the school appropria- 
tion bears to the total general purpose appropriations of 
the same year. The figures deal with appropriations and 
not expenditures. 



1943 .... 


Percentage, not including 
school bond retire- 
ments and interest, 
as school expense 

„ 38.5 


Percentage, including 
school bond retire- 
ments and interest, 
as school expense 

38.5 


1949 


„ 37.7 


46.5 


1950 .... 


- 40,8 


48.5 


1951 -.. 


„ ..... 43.7 


50.4 


1952 


41.0 


53. 


1953 


50.9 


62. 



The major decreases in appropriations recommended 
in comparison with 1952 appropriations are : 

Item 43 Chapter 90- Highways $4,000 

48 Public Welfare 9,000 

The Committee made the following transfers from the 
Reserve Fund during the year: 

Highway Machinery — 

Repairs « - $836.57 

Highway Salaries — 

Lack of Chap. 90 work...... „ 1,341.40 

Board of Appeals — 

Increased Postage - 100.00 

Town House — 

Salary - ~ 7.87 

Election and Registration — 

Special Town Meeting .. 44.94 

Inspectors (Bldgs., etc.) 

Additional Inspections .. 88.12 



76 FINANCE 

Board of Health 

Increased Expense 54.85 



Total $2,473.75 

Without the appropriations at the Special Town Meet- 
ing of $2,500. for Aid to Disabled and $2,000 for Dutch 
Elm Disease Control, the $4,000. Reserve Account would 
not have been sufficient for the unforseen expenses. 

The unexpended appropriations accruing to surplus 
aggregated $7,006.33, and unexpended appropriations 
which carry forward and do not require reappropriation 
aggregate $21,449. The details appear in the Treasurer's 
Report. 

We recommend the appropriation of $30,000. from free 
cash for bond retirement, and $6,500. as an advance on 
Chapter 90, Road Construction and Maintenance. 

Your elected officers and the departments under their 
charge, we believe, have served the town well and have 
made judicious Hise of the appropriations available. 

Much of the top responsibility for the town's business 
is shouldered by citizens to whom no payment or only 
token payment is made but who contribute competence 
not to be measured by any salary we can expect to pay 
based on service rendered. They deserve the thanks of 
the Townspeople. 

In our opinion, the recommended appropriations make 
entirely adequate provision for carrying on the public 
business of the Town for the year 1953. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO, Chairman, 
LELAND A. WILDES, Secretary, 
WILLIAM N. PAGE 
THOMAS L. ROUNER 
PAUL L. NORTON 

Finance Committee. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



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Jrrotection of 
Jrersom ana 1 roperty 

Report of the Police Department 

The Police Department now consists of three regular 
officers, twenty-three special officers and two radio 
equipped cruisers. The radios are in connection with the 
Concord Police Department. The resuscitator, purchased 
at last year's Town meeting, is carried in one of the 
cruisers at all times and is always available for any 
case of respiratory disorder. 

For the benefit of old and new residents alike the 
following information will be of value when calling for 
the police. The Lincoln Police telephone number, as listed 
in your telephone directory, is Lincoln 6-0174. Since this 
line has four extensions, in most cases your call will be 
answered. However, in case of an emergency and there 
is no answer on this line, simply inform the telephone 
operator that it is an emergency call, who you are, where 
you are and the nature of the emergency. The operator 
will contact the Concord Police who will in turn contact 
the Lincoln Police via radio. This service given by the 
Lincoln telephone office is definitely beyond their regular 
line of duty and is a service for which all residents of 
the Town should be most thankful. 

Your Police Department is on twenty-four hour duty 
and is always ready to serve you. 



PROTECTION 85 

I wish to extend my thanks to the local telephone 
operators and to the Concord Police Department for their 
help and cooperation throughout the past year. 

The following report includes all arrests made within 
the Town of Lincoln during the past year. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 51 

Arrests by State Police 50 

Total number of arrests 101 

Crimes against the Person : 

Assault and Battery 1 

Crimes against property : 

Breaking and Entering and Larceny .... ... 4 

Breaking glass 1 

Larceny under $100.00 2 

Using motor vehicle without authority .... 1 

Crimes against Public order, etc. : 

Delinquency 2 

Drunkenness 11 

Escapee 6 

Vagrancy 1 

Violation of Game Laws 2 . 

Violation Governors Proclamation closing 

woodlands 4 

Violation Motor Vehicle Laws 66 

Violations Motor Vehicle Laws reported . . 

to the Registrar of Motor Vehicles 34 

Motor Vehicle Accident Report : 

Accidents reported * 83 

Occupants injured .' 60 

Pedestrians injured 1 

Fatal accidents 1 

Summonses served for other Police 

Departments 81 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEO J. ALGEO, Chief of Police. 



86 PROTECTION 

Report of Board of Fire Engineers 

The Department responded to 86 alarms during the 
calendar year of 1952. To better visualize the distribution 
of these calls, they have been listed below by type of fire 
and the quarter of the year in which they were recorded : 

1st 2nd 3rd 4th Total 

Brush .. 6 13 8 7 34 

Chimney .. 13 2 6 

House ... — .. 1 1 

Dump „ 1 3 3 2 9 

Auto 1 1 11 4 

Oil Burner 2 114 

"CD" Test - 1 1 

Miscellaneous 3 5 11 7 26 

False „ 1 1 



Total Fires 86 

The total property loss for the year amounted to $1,000. 
Although the operation costs of the Department indicated 
an unexpended balance in the labor account as estimated 
for 1952, we have recommended that the budget for 1953 
be increased by $100 in the operation of equipment ac- 
count, in order that better maintenance of the fire ap- 
paratus be assured. 

During 1952 the Department added 500 feet of booster 
hose to its equipment. We have also replaced the two 
Civilian Defense medical kits and in their place have two 



FIRE 



87 



fire department type first aid units. The following list 
represents the call men assigned to the Fire Department : 



E. MacLeod 
W. Porter 
E. Teabo 
D. Todd 
L. Todd 
R. Malloy 
R. Gormley 
J. Knowles 
W, Meriam 
(provisional) 



J. Cotoni 

C. Smith 

A. Davis, Jr. 

J. Algeo 

Frank Gordon Jr. 

(Armed Services) 
C. C. Wood 
W. Doherty 
E. Murphy 
C. Bradley 



A. Brooks 
H. Lawson 
F. Campobasso 
J. Campobasso 
D. Spooner 
W. Dean 
F. Gordon 
C. Lahnstein 
O. a Wood, Jr. 



A. J. DOUGHERTY, Chief 
C. K. FITTS, Clerk 
JOSEPH TRACEY, 

Board of Engineers 



Report of the Inspector of Animals 

The following- animals have been inspected : 

Cows, 2 years and older 209 Steers 12 

Heifers, 1-2 years 66 Horses 33 

Heifers, under 1 year 66 Goats 2 

Bulls 10 Sheep 5 

Swine 1 , 136 

I have found the animals to be under the rules and reg- 
ulations of the Division of Livestock Disease Control 
and have supplied the Division of Livestock Disease Con- 
trol with a list of the owners and the number and kind 
of animals on the premises. 

There is an epidemic among swine which is somewhat 
similar to the foot and mouth disease among cattle, but 
no case has been reported in Lincoln. 

Eight dog bites were reported, six of these by local 
dogs, another by a dog that could not be located; the 
eighth bite was by an unlicensed Concord dog, and Con- 
cord took action against the owner of the animal. 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 

Inspector of Animals 



88 CIVIL DEFENSE — TREE WARDEN 



Civil Defense Agency 

The Lincoln Civil Defense Agency was placed on a 
standby basis during the year. Certain unfinished or- 
ganizational projects carried forward from 1951 were 
completed. All divisions, with the exception of traffic, 
have now been organized. The latter awaits final agree- 
ment on inter-town arrangements before volunteers to 
fill the posts will be recruited. 

No appropriation is being asked in 1953. In 1952, 
$872.55, out of an allotment of $1,500.00, was expended. 
It is estimated that for the current year basic expenses 
will run about $375.00 for communications, $200.00 for 
clerical assistance, and $150.00 for supplies and material. 
This sum can be taken from the unexpended balance of 
the 1952 appropriation, with any overdraft coming from 
the Selectmen's fund. 

The present policy is to continue on a standby basis, 
with a minimum of expenditure, to conform with the 
emergency laws still on the books. 

ROBERT H. BOOTH, Director 



Report of the Tree Warden 

The Tree Warden's duties are established by State law 
and consist primarily of care of the public shade trees 
and control of Dutch elm disease. He has sole control 
of the shade trees, that is trees along the public ways, in 
parks, and on other Town owned property, including 
trimming, spraying, removal, and planting. 

In the control of Dutch elm disease, he must detect 
infection and see to the removal of infected trees. Any 
infected trees on public ways or Town property are to 
be removed by his department or under his direction. 



TREE WARDEN 89 

He has authority to order the owners of other infected 
trees to remove them and the power to enforce his orders. 

Resitox D-25, a liquid D.D.T., was used in both the 
general foliage spray to control the gypsy moth in late 
May and June and in the August spraying of the road- 
side elms. A five hundred dollar increase in the appro- 
priation is being requested for 1953 so that the work 
may be done more thoroughly. 

A survey of all elm trees visible from the road was 
made this year to check on Dutch elm disease. Samples 
were cut from 97 suspects and the Shade Tree Labora- 
tory at the State College confirmed 73 as being infected, 
45 on private property and 28 on public ways. Pursuant 
to vote and appropriation at the Special Town Meeting 
in November, all were removed at public expense with 
the exception of a few on private property which the 
owners preferred to destroy themselves. More infection 
will appear in 1953. All residents of the Town are urged 
to report to the Tree Warden anything of a suspicious 
nature in elm trees so that samples may be sent for an- 
alysis promptly. 

Spraying of poison ivy along the roadsides was carried 
on in July with good results. A continuation of this pro- 
gram is recommended. 

In order to do a timely and efficient job, the Moth 
Department will need a new sprayer of greater capacity 
and a second-hand truck on which to mount it. The pres- 
ent sprayer will be used for poison ivy work, replacing 
the inefficient and worn out equipment now available 
for that purpose. 

I wish to thank the members of the Police Department 
for their prompt notification of storm damage, and the 
members of the Highway Department for their coopera- 
tion and help. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DANIEL A. MacINNIS, JR.. 
Tree Warden 



uteaitk ana ( To elf are 



Report of the Boord of Health 

In March of 1952, the Board of Health held its first 
meeting and voted to continue the duties of its members 
as of the previous year. Mrs. Nancy Hurd resumed her 
secretarial duties; Mr. Flint, member of the Nursing 
Committee; and Dr. Donaldson, chairman. Mrs. Ober 
was again appointed agent, and Mr. William Davis, burial 
agent. Mr. Andrew Dougherty was asked to continue as 
Inspector of Animals, and Dr. Alden Russell, Inspector 
of Slaughtering. 

In May of 1952 various licenses were renewed or grant- 
ed : sale of wood alcohol, 5 ; maintenance of piggeries, 4 ; 
home for the aged, 2 ; convalescent home, 1 ; overnight 
cabins, 1 ; sale of oleomargerine, 1 ; slaughtering of poul- 
try, 1. 

As required by State law, various diseases have been 
reported to the Board of Health by attending physicians : 
Measles, 305 ; chicken pox, 34 ; dog bite, 10 ; whooping 
cough, 4; mumps, 3; poliomyelitis, 3. The procedure for 
handling the problem of dog bite has been outlined in the 
reports of the past two years, and no changes have been 
made. Although advances have been made in the labora- 
tory in the understanding of poliomyelitis, the best prac- 
tical preventive in the summer months remains the avoid- 
ance of undue physical exhaustion and excessive sweat- 



BOARD OF HEALTH 91 

ing or chilling. Quarantine was not established last sum- 
mer, and none is justified in the present knowledge of 
poliomyelitis. Physical rest and avoidance of strenuous 
exertion with playmates, particularly in the week or two 
after exposure to the disease, does seem rational ; and 
this will be encouraged in the ensuing year. 

On May 3, 152 dogs attended the Dog Clinic and were 
innoculated against rabies. The clinic will again be held 
this year at the Town Barn; and this seems to be the 
logical time to license dogs with the Town Clerk, as well 
as protect your dog against rabies and yourself from 
law suits. Due notice will be sent dog owners well in 
advance of this clinic in May. 

We were fortunate again in having Dr. John Davies 
conduct the Well Child Conference in a series of eleven 
c'inics held at regular intervals through the year. These 
check-up clinics are open to all, and a minimal charge 
is made for preventive innoculations of various types. 
Twenty-nine babies under one year, 47 children between 
the ages of one and four, and 82 in the immediate pre- 
school age group, four to six, were presented for general 
physical examination. 

The Dental Clinic continued its active pace in the past 
year. The general policy in this clinic was outlined in 
the Town Report of 1951. In June Dr. Harold Ehrlich 
was called into military service, and we were fortunate 
in securing Dr. David Farrell from the Harvard Dental 
School. After six years of training in medical and dental 
work at school, he comes very highly recommended, and 
has gained the confidence of his children patients and 
the respect of those who have worked with him. 

The possibility of adding fluorine to the Town water 
supply has temporarily been tabled. It is still recom- 
mended as the best preventive of tooth decay, particularly 
if begun in infancy and continued for ten or twelve 
years, but some have felt that more data regarding its 
drawbacks and dangers in a rural community should be 
accumulated before it is used extensively. 



92 HEALTH AND WELFARE 

The Board has continued its interest in the Union 
Health movement, and the members have attended meet- 
ings in company with the special committee appointed 
by the Moderator to explore this program. As in any 
new legislation, certain flaws have been uncovered and 
reports from the State House indicate that steps are 
afoot to make this law, effective as of 1959, more ap- 
plicable and helpful to towns similar to Lincoln. A pre- 
vious report discusses this projected law in more detail. 
Among other worthwhile features, the Union Health or- 
ganization would provide a Sanitation Officer, shared by 
Lincoln with one or more other towns. At the present 
time the Board feels such an officer with special training 
in this field would be most useful in helping settle various 
problems which seem to appear with increasing fre- 
quency. It is felt that shortly a part time Sanitation 
Officer might be acquired, regardless of the immediate 
future of the Union Health Law. 

Finally, some garbage nuisances continue to exist about 
Town, and we would call new residents' attention to the 
collection route conducted by Mr. Joseph Cotoni. It is 
hoped that an individual contract arrangement may be 
worked out whereby home-to-home garbage collection at 
regular intervals may be made for an annual fee. 

NANCY HURD 

WARREN FLINT 

GORDON DONALDSON, M.D. 



NURSING COMMITTEE 93 



Report of the Nursing Committee 

The Nursing Committee of the Town is made up of 
three members: one from the School Committee, one 
from the Board of Health, and one from the Town at 
large It is the purpose of this Committee to work with 
the Community Nurse on those problems which she en- 
counters in her work throughout the Town 

At the present time Mrs Ober, our Community Nurse, 
as an agent of the Board of Health covers all the public 
nursing needs of the Town, as well as the school health 
program, which she directs in her capacity as School 
Nurse Mrs. Ober's duties under the direction of the Board 
of Health include bedside nursing, social welfare work, 
supervision of the Well Child Conference w T hich Dr. 
Davies so ab> conducts, registration of the Water Safety 
Class which the American Red Cross sponsors at Lake 
Walden, one morning and one afternoon a week as as- 
sistant to Dr. David Farrell at the Dental Clinic, assist- 
ance with the annual Dog Clinic, and conference attend- 
ance. 

Owing to the rapid growth of the Town — population 
has increased from about 1,500 to over 2,400, and the 
elementary school population has increased from 118 
to 483 since Mrs. Ober took this position twenty years 
ago — the time is fast approaching when one person 
will no longer be able to meet the demands. In an effort 
to apportion her time for maximum efficiency, Mrs. Ober 
is seeking to adhere to a more rigid schedule than has 
been the custom in the past. Barring exceptional circum- 
stances, the majority of her mornings will be spent at 
the school, and the afternoons devoted to community 
nursing and the clinics. It is also suggested that persons 
trying to reach Mrs. Ober leave their names for a return 
telephone call, thus eliminating insofar as possible eve- 
ning and week-end business calls. It is possible that 



94 HEALTH AND WELFARE 

some relief may be secured through volunteer assistance 
with routine duties. It is the suggestion of the Nursing 
Committee that our increasing public nursing needs be 
considered in any appraisal which the Town may make 
of the Union Health Program currently under study. 

1951 1952 

Total number of calls 1,769 1,890 

Medical 790 1,164 

Surgical 205 119 

Pre-natal 49 35 

Post-natal 12 24 

Child Welfare 294 233 

Well Child and Dental Clinic 251* 247 

Social Welfare 42 97 

Board of Health 78 92 

Out of town (hospitals, conferences, 

supplies, etc.) .',..' 48 33 

Fees collected]- $445.75 $751.55 



* Well Child Conference only. 

f Includes all fees: nursing calls, dental, Well Child Conference. 

Mrs. Ober reports that during the past year the school 
faculty and the bus drivers all received chest X-rays. 

Again this year, as in the past, the Town has been 
fortunate in getting Miss Bates to substitute for Mrs. 
Ober during the latter's vacation in August. 

LUCY BYGRAVE 
ALBERTA FRADD, Secretary 
WARREN FLINT, Chairman 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 95 



Report of the Committee on 
Old Age Assistance and Public Welfare 

Fundamentally the aim of the public assistance pro- 
gram is, through financial assistance and service, to 
meet the basic needs of those people who are unable to 
meet them through their own efforts or resources. Closely 
related to this aim is the responsibility to help people 
recognize and make full use of all their resources and 
capacities, as well as all available community resources, 
in meeting their problems and maintaining themselves 
in the most self-reliant way possible to them. Public 
assistance agencies are set up by the community as a 
whole to make sure that all members of the community 
have the means for adequate and healthy living. If the 
individual cannot obtain this from his own resources 
or through his own efforts, it is the responsibility of 
the public assistance agency to provide the means. The 
agency also has the added responsibility of helping the 
individual, within his abilities, to develop his resources 
and increase his efforts toward meeting his require- 
ments. 

There are now four categories of Public Assistance, 
namely Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children, 
Aid to Disabled, and Public Welfare. The Federal Gov- 
ernment and the State contribute to the first three cate- 
gories and for this reason there are certain rules and 
regulations, established by them, that must be carried 
out in order to receive reimbursement under these pro- 
grams. 

Following is a summary of expenditures and receipts 
in all categories. 

Old Age Assistance : 

Gross Cost $36,419.88 

Federal Government 13,803.01 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 17,401.91 



96 HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Meals Tax 1,332.69 

Other Cities and Towns 1,740.01 

Cost to Town of Lincoln 10,419.45 



$44,697.07 
Balance in Federal Grants account, 

reserved for Old Age Assistance 8,277.19 



$36,419.88 



The Old Age Assistance case load has been reduced 
from 42 at the beginning of the year to 37 at the close 
of the year. For this reason there is a substantial bal- 
ance held in reserve for Old Age Assistance in the Fed- 
eral Grants account and a smaller appropriation has 
been requested for the year 1953. 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Gross Cost $192.40 

About 75% of this amount will be re-imbursed by the 

State and Federal Government. 

Aid to Disabled: 

Gross Cost $2,583.10 

Federal Government 90.00 



$2,673.10 
Balance in Federal Grants account, reserved 

for Aid to Disabled 90.00 



$2,583.10 



Although only $90.00 was received in 1952 75%, of 
the total amount will be re-imbursed by the State and 
Federal Government. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER, 
Public Welfare Agent. 



UNION HEALTH DEPARTMENTS 97 

Report of the Committee 
to Study Union Health Departments 

The Lincoln Committee, members of the Board of 
Health, and Mrs. Ober, have continued to meet with 
similar committees and representatives of Boards of 
Health of most of the towns mentioned in last year's 
report. Concord, Lexington, Sudbury and Lincoln repre- 
sentatives have most faithfully attended the meetings 
this year, but it is hoped that Acton, Bedford, Carlisle, 
Wayland, Stow and Maynard may be reactivated in the 
coming months. 

Under discussion were Public Health Services already 
rendered in the various towns, i.e. — Sanitary Inspection, 
Hea-th Units, Nursing Services, Well Child Clinics, and 
all measures that might be called for under the terms 
of the Act. Meetings are always open to anyone inter- 
ested in attending. 

There has been discussion during the fall of 1952 
about new proposed amendments to the original Act. 
These amendments have to do with the compulsory clause 
and also a proposal providing financial assistance by 
the Commonwealth for local Health Departments. Since 
these amendments are scheduled to come before the pres- 
ent Legislature for decision, the Lincoln Committee and 
those of the neighboring towns are in accord that we 
should reserve recommendation for action by our towns 
until we know the results of the proposed amendments. 

However, we do recommend again that the Committee 
be continued in existence for another year, the Moderator 
being empowered to make such changes in its member- 
ship as he may find necessary. 

NANCY D. HURD 
RICHARD K. CONANT 
JEAN M. MURPHY 
BRADFORD CANNON 
ELLIOTT R. HEDGE 



(PL 



ayiyiLYicj 
ana Jrubtic OYorlcs 



Report of the Lincoln Planning Board 

The Planning Board was organized with Alan Mc- 
Clennen, Chairman, and Howard Snelling, Clerk. Ac- 
tivities during the year covered three fields : subdivision 
control, zoning changes, and general long term planning. 

Subdivisions 

During the year the following subdivisions were ap- 
proved : 

Robert Pearmain, August 28, 1952, Medina Road, off 
Trapelo Road; 

James A. Carrig, October 22, 1952, Morningside Lane, 
off Bedford Road. 

Several other subdivisions and land problems were con- 
sidered. 

Zoning Amendments 
The general amendment to the Zoning By-Law and 
Map which was passed unanimously by the Town in 
March, 1951, was never approved by the Attorney Gen- 
eral. Upon recommendation of counsel, the Board is 
re-submitting the matter to the Town in order that it may 
properly be placed before the Attorney General again. 
The Board expects that some additional changes will 
be recommended to the Town. 



PLANNING BOARD 9fl 

On May 7, 1952, a public hearing was held on the pe- 
tition of John 0. Wilson and others requesting considera- 
tion of a proposal to create a Light Industrial District 
off the Airport Road. The Board devoted several meet- 
ings to the matter. Since the petitioners have not pre- 
sented the matter to the Town for approval, the Board 
has taken no further action on it. 

On May 7, 1952, a public hearing was held on the 
petition of Norman Brisson and others for an extension 
of the business area on North Great Road 544 feet west- 
erly. This area had been considered as suitable for the 
proposed use when the Board was reviewing the by-law 
and map in 1950 and 1951. Since the petitioners have not 
presented the matter to the Town for approval, the Board 
has taken no further action on it. 

Long Term Problems 

The Planning Board has been giving some attention 
to the matter of the reservation of added land under 
public control. Two possibilities present themselves. The 
first is active play areas, which, as the Town grows, it 
may be found desirable to have north of Route 2 and 
south of the railroad. The second is the desirability of 
protecting the watershed of Sandy Pond. 

The Board, at the request of the Selectmen, has been 
studying alternative locations for a Town Dump. It is 
hoped that detailed recommendations may be made at 
the Town Meeting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALAN McCLENNEN, Chairman 
HOWARD SNELLING, Clerk 
WILLIAM T. KING 
RICHARD W. EATON 
ARTHUR T. HOWARD 



100 PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of Board of Zoning Appeals 

The Board of Appeals has met more frequently during 
1952 than any previous year. 

The primary function of the Board of Appeals is a 
semi- judicial one. Because the Town of Lincoln is pro- 
tected by a carefully defined zoning by-law, the Board 
of Appeals exists to hear appeals by individuals who feel 
that special circumstances entitle them to relief from a 
rigid application of the zoning by-law to their particular 
circumstances. 

Each case is thoroughly and fully considered on its 
individual merits and in relationship to any possible 
effect not only on an immediate neighborhood but also 
on the Town as a whole. 

Every effort is made by the Board to decide appeals 
arising under the zoning by-law fairly, impartially, and 
for the good of the Town as a whole. Of course the 
Board of Appeals is not an enforcement agency. The 
Board has no power whatsoever to enforce provisions 
of the zoning by-laws. Violations of the zoning by-law 
must be dealt with primarily through individuals and 
agencies under the Board of Selectmen. Set forth below 
is a summary of the decisions of the Board. 

January 7, 1952 

Permission granted to John C. and James J. Canella 
for extension of a non-conforming use to permit the sale 
of new and used automobiles on their premises, subject 
to restrictions set forth by the Board of Appeals and on 
file at the office of the Town Clerk. 

Permission to remove loam from property on Bedford 
Road granted to James A. Carrig subject to terms and 
conditions set forth by the Board of Appeals and on file 
at the office of the Town Clerk. 



ZONING APPEALS 101 

February 26, 1952 

Permission granted to Robert P. Condit to use a Multi- 
lith Duplicator in his home on Concord Road. 

Permission granted to Joseph Hurd for a variance to 
permit the construction of a store on Lincoln Road. 

Permission granted to Philip Corrigan for a variance 
to permit the construction of a garage and breeze way on 
property on Winter Street. 

March 10, 1952 

Permission granted to Domenic Dominichello for a va- 
riance to permit alterations to a building on Mill Street. 

Permission granted for one year only to Mary A. and 
Delia M. Neville to store contractors equipment in a barn 
and yard on Nelson Road. 

Permission granted to Lena Primak for a variance to 
permit alterations to her property on North Great Road. 

March 24, 1952 

Permission granted for one year only to W. Newton 
Nelson to store contractors equipment in a barn and yard 
on Nelson Road. 

Permission granted for one year only to Norman F. 
Brisson to store contractors equipment in gravel pit off 
North Great Road. 

April 28, 1952 

Permission granted to Ferdinand L. Troisi for a vari- 
ance to permit alterations to his property on Old Sudbury 
Road. 

Permission granted for one year only to Mildred Bowles 
to rent ponies on her property subject to the approval of 
the Board of Health and provided that ponies be restricted 
to her property and not to exceed three in number. 



102 PUBLIC WORKS 

July 16, 1952 

Permission granted for one year only to Francis Um- 
brello to use a trailer on his property on South Great 
Road for sleeping quarters for hired help, subject to re- 
strictions set forth by the Board of Appeals and on file 
at the office of the Town Clerk. 

Application of Joseph Morrissey for permission to re- 
move loam from his property on Airport Road not acted 
upon. 

Application of Pasquale B. Conti for extension of a 
non-conforming use not acted upon. 

September 9, 1952 

Application of Pasquale B. Conti for extension of a non- 
conforming use denied. 

Permission granted to Paul F. Shepard to use a build- 
ing as a dwelling on Virginia Road. 

Application of George Dubina for a variance to permit 
the use of property on Concord Turnpike for business 
purposes denied. 

Permission granted to Merrill and Hope Hunt to con- 
tinue the use of their house for two families for a period 
of one year under section 21 of the zoning by-laws. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE 
HENRY B. HOOVER 
CHARLES K. FITTS 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 103 



Report of the Water Commissioners 

Policy of the Board on Extension and Improvement 
of the System 

The Department is run as nearly as possible on a pay- 
as-you-go basis, no borrowing having been done since 
well before the War, when the 12" main was laid on Bed- 
ford Road. When a sufficient accumulation exists in the 
Water Works Treasury, a project is undertaken. A strong 
effort is made to give priority to possible projects in order 
of their value to the Town as a whole. For instance, the 
present project is the metering of the Town in an effort 
to put the charges for water on a fair basis and to elim- 
inate wastage. Since this project, spread over three years, 
costs some $6,000 a year, and since water works surplus 
has been used in the efforts to locate a practical new 
water supply, no important extensions or replacements 
of pipe can be contemplated for the immediate future. 

There are several areas in Town where increased pop- 
ulation or the age and small original size of the present 
pipe would warrant extension or replacement. In making 
a selection as to which one of these areas to attend to 
first, the Board must take into consideration a number 
of factors. Among these are: cost of project in each area 
(which in turn is a function of the distances involved 
and the terrain) ; number of persons served in each area; 
future population trends in the Town and so on. In ad- 
dition, decisions must be reached as to whether it is better- 
to complete a smaller project as soon as funds are avail- 
able or to wait perhaps another year and save toward 
a larger one. In any event, the Board tries to settle each 
situation in as logical a manner as possible. 

Routine Works 

The Commissioners employed a superintendent and 
two men full time during the year. They operated the 
pumps, repaired leaks, attended to general upkeep and 



104 PUBLIC WORKS 

repairs, including attention to the hydrants, renewed 
worn-out services, and installed new ones This is the 
routine work of the Water Works. The balance of the 
time and the balance of income was used in purchasing 
and installing meters. 

The Board intends to follow the same procedure this 
year. 

Regulations Pertaining to the Installation of 
Sub-Division Water Supply Mains 

Regulations and requirements for the guidance of Real 
Estate developers applying for water connections and 
for those seeking extension of water mains are on file 
in the Town Hall and may be examined by request. 

The following applications were received and acted 
upon: 

Permain Application 

An application for approval of pipe layout on proposed 
Medina Road in development by Robert Permain off 
Trapelo Road was granted after due examination and 
discussion. 

Moscza Application 

Mrs. Anna Moscza desired Town water for a distance 
of about 1,400 feet along the cutoff from the corner of 
Route 2-A and Brooks Road. The State Highway Com- 
mission will not issue permits to individuals for such 
work on State property, so the Town, through the Water 
Commissioners, with protection by contract, surety and 
indemnity bonds, acted as intermediary and granted the 
permit. This extension was completed last November and 
practically became the property of the Water Works. It 
may be accepted by the Town upon approval and recom- 
mendation of the Water Commissioners, after the two 
year maintenance by the contractor has expired. 

James C. Carrig Application 
An application from James C. Carrig (for approval) 
of a pipe layout to bring water to subdivisions on Shea 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 105 

and Taylor Farms, was approved after Mr Carrig agreed 
to abide by the Water Works Regulations which included 
the requirements that he connect the proposed main in. 
the Taylor subdivision with that at corner Route 2-A 
and Old Bedford Road. 

Burkett Application 

Mr. D. M. Burkett of Cambridge applied for water for 
a house to be built on Page Road approximately 704 feet 
beyond the terminus of the Town main. He was advised 
that according to the regulations of the Water Works, 
the main might be extended at his expense under Water 
Works supervision. 

Water Waste or Leak Survey 

There are extremely emphatic indications that much 
more water is pumped than is accounted for by consump- 
tion. The reservoir was tested for leaks and appears 
tight. In order to locate leaks in the pipe system the Com- 
missioners recommend accepting the current proposal 
from the Pitometer Company to make a "Water Waste 
Survey," which includes the following : 

Details of Work to Be Done 

The term "Pitometer Water Waste Survey" will in- 
clude the following : 

First •: A test of the high lift pumps for slip or effi- 
ciency, if practicable, and a measurement of the total 
consumption. 

Second : A division of the distribution system into each 
districts, and a measurement of the flow into each district 
throughout the twenty-four hours. 

Third: Further investigation in all districts wheiv 
excessive waste is indicated, for the purpose of locating 
all underground leaks of the mains and services large 
enough to be measured with the Pitometer. These tests 
will also result in determining those sections where waste 



106 PUBLIC WORKS 

is occurring, due to leaking plumbing fixtures, so that 
house-to-house inspections may be made by the Town 
under the supervision of our engineer, if desired. 

Fourth: A check on all large industrial consumers 
for the purpose of detecting the unauthorized use of un- 
metered water, through fire lines or otherwise, and a test 
of all commercial and industrial meters larger than three 
inches in diameter in place, wherever feasible, either by 
direct or indirect measurements with the Pitometer- 

Fifth: At the completion of the survey a report of 
the work in detail will be submitted, accompanied by a 
map showing the boundaries of each district, the location 
of all gauging points, and charts showing the variation 
of flow into each district. 

Cost of Engineering Services: We will undertake 
such a survey for the sum of Fifteen Hundred ($1,500.00) 
Dollars, this sum to include the services of our engineers, 
their living and traveling expenses, and the use of the 
necessary Pitometers. 

Cooperation by the Town : The Town will furnish 
and set corporation cocks at the points designated by 
our engineers, supply competent labor for operating valves 
and repairing leaks, construct and furnish shelter boxes 
for the protection of our instruments, and furnish trans- 
portation necessary for properly conducting the Survey. 

Terms of Payment: Payments will be made in the 
following manner : 

One-third when the Town has been divided into dis- 
tricts and the flow into each district measured with the 
Pitometer. 

One-third when the field work has been completed. 

The remaining one-third when the report has been 
submitted and accepted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THE PITOMETER COMPANY, INC. 
By: E.D. CASE, President 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 107 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY 

The Commissioners, through the efficient efforts of 
Representative Russell, were successful in having the 
following House Bill No. 1151 passed, 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In the year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Fifty-two. 

An act relating to the disposition of certain property now 
used for water supply purposes in or adjacent to the 
Town of Lincoln. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the 
same, as follows: 

Section 1. In the event that the City of Cambridge 
or any officer or board acting under its authority, shall 
determine to sell, lease, abandon or otherwise dispose of 
its property or rights or any portion thereof lying in or 
adjacent to the town of Lincoln, and included in the water 
basin commonly called the Hobbs Brook reservoir, or in 
any stream or tributary connected with said reservoir, 
and lying in or adjacent to said town or shall be authorized 
or directed by the Commonwealth so to do, no such sale, 
lease, abandonment, or other disposition shall become 
effective until said Town of Lincoln, through its Board 
of Selectmen and its Board of Water Commissioners shall 
have been notified by registered mail of such intended 
disposition, and until said property lying in or adjacent 
to said Town of Lincoln shall have been offered to said 
town for purchase, lease or acquisition otherwise for 
water supply or other municipal purposes. Such notice 
of intention and offer shall be made by the City of Cam- 
bridge as above provided not less than one year previous 
to the date when such intended sale, lease, abandonment 
or other disposition is planned to become effective. In 
case any such transaction is proposed to be carried out 
by authority of or by direction of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts or of any board or commissioner acting 
under it, notice of intention as above provided shall be 
issued in the same manner by the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth. 






108 PUBLIC WORKS 

ESTIMATES, 1953 

The following budget is estimated and recommended 
for passing: 

Salaries .. $4,725.00 

Labor „ „ 6,000.00 

Meters, Equipment Supplies and 

Maintenance „ 10,000.00 

Services and Equipment Rental ~ 1,350.00 

Power ~ - 3,000.00 

Miscellaneous .. - 400.00 

Legal and Engineering ~ „ 3,000.00 

$28,475.00 

STATISTICS — January I, 1953 

Pipe in use 29.254 in 

Number of hydrants in use - „ 213 

Number stop-gates in use „ 271 

Number blow-offs in use 27 

Range of pressure on mains 40 - 100 lbs. 

Total gallons pumped 1 50,000,000 

Number of services added „ 37 

Number services renewed 18 

Number services in use 696 

Number meters in use 11 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY S. WARNER, Secty. 
ROBERT W. SCOTT 
SUMNER SMITH, Chairman 



WATER SUPPLY 109 

Report to the League of Women Voters 
on the Town Water Supply 

By 

Dr. Charles H Blake 

The Water Commissioners consider the following re- 
port, prepared for the League of Women Voters, so 
valuable that it is being printed herewith for future 
reference and for the information of the Town. It is the 
result of very thorough work performed by Dr. Blake 
and his collaborators. It contains expert opinion and its 
conclusions are a guide to the plans of the Commissioners. 

Stimulated by a general public lack of comprehension 
of the Town water system, the Lincoln League of Women 
Voters in the early fall of 1951 set up a project to remedy 
the situation. 

A number of citizens have contributed to the technical 
side of this study, notably C. P. Kindleberger, E. P. Neu- 
mann, E. S. Taylor, Harland Newton, and F. S. Taylor. 
Under the chairmanship of Mrs. Charles Kubik, a num- 
ber of members of the League have been most helpful. 
Finally and very importantly, the Board of Water Com- 
missioners have been ever ready to provide us with data 
and to discuss the problems which arose. Prof. Rolf 
E iassen discussed some points at length with E. S. Tay- 
lor and C. H. Blake. All these persons deserve the warm 
thanks of the League and the Town. 

The study fell rather naturally into two major divisions, 
the physical and the financial. 

PHYSICAL 

Typical questions which arise under this head are : 
What does the physical plant in Lincoln consist of? How 
much water do we use? How long will the present sources 
of suppy be adquate? 



110 PUBLIC WORKS 

General Description — At present, Lincoln gets its en- 
tire water supply from Sandy Pond. When Sandy Pond 
is full the surface area is 156 acres. The water shed 
from which the water flows into Sandy Pond has about 
three times this area. The capacity of Sandy Pond when 
it is full is 729,000,000 gallons. If all of this water could 
be used and no rain fell, it would be approximately sum- 
cient to supply the Town for four years at the present 
rate of consumption. However, the intake to the pump is 
located eight feet below the high water level and only 
329,000,000 gallons or about two years of storage is avail- 
able. This is assuming that none of the water in Sandy 
Pond is being used by Concord. Up to 1948 Concord 
used less than 20% of the amount of water that Lincoln 
took out of Sandy Pond. However, in 1949, Concord 
used nearly as much water from Sandy Pond as did I in- 
coln. This was presumably due to some changes being 
made in the Concord water system, and in 1950 Concord's 
draw from Sandy Pond was about one-third of Lincoln's. 

In a normal year approximately 41 inches of rain falls 
in this area. This means that 512 million gallons of water 
fall on the water shed which supplies Sandy Pond. About 
45% of this is pumped out of Sandy Pond by the com- 
bined Lincoln and Concord pumping systems. (45% would 
be about 230 million gallons.) The rest is lost, presumably 
by evaporation, transpiration from the trees, and leakage 
through the ground. Since the pond has not overflowed 
in recent years, it seems reasonable to believe that this 
is the maximum amount of water which can be pumped 
out of the pond without reducing its level. If the level 
is reduced, somewhat less water is lost by evaporation. 

Lincoln has two pumps whieh take water from Sandy 
Pond and put it into the main supplying the Town. Only 
one of these pumps is run at any one time. The other 
pump is held in reserve in case of mechanical failure. In 
case of electric failure, one pump is arranged so that it 
can be driven by a gasoline engine. When the pumps 
are operating, any excess of water pumped, over the 
amount immediately used by the Town, goes to a- storage 



WATER SUPPLY 111 

basin (the reservoir) located on Bedford Road. When 
the pumps are not operating, the Town is supplied from 
this storage basin. The capacity of this storage basin is 
about three days supply at the normal rate of use in the 
Town. This basin (or reservoir) also has the important 
function of ''storing" pressure. A 12-inch pipe leads from 
the pump on Sandy Pond Road to the basin on Bedford 
Road. If this pipe were clean, it would have adequate ca- 
pacity to handle the flow from both pumps. However, 
the pipe has been in use for some time and is partially 
filled with deposits. Its present capacity is about equiv- 
alent to a 10-inch pipe and is just about adequate to take 
care of the discharge from one pump. This pipe thus 
forms one of the bottlenecks in the Lincoln water supply. 
At present it limits the rate at which water can be pumped 
out of Sandy Pond. 

The accompanying map gives a rather complete picture 
of the water mains now in service in Lincoln. As a gen- 
erality, we may say that the smaller the main, the longer 
it has been in use. The policy of the Water Board is to 
make replacements with 8-inch pipe or larger. The quan- 
tity of pipe replaced varies somewhat from year to year. 
In an average year rather more than one third of the 
Water Department's income goes into replacements and 
additions. The partition between these two categories 
of new pipe would hardly be expected to be fixed, i.e., the 
proportion of new pipe laid which is additional to the 
system varies from year to year. 

Water Consumption — Owing to the fact that there are 
only 12 meters on the individual services in the Town 
of Lincoln (December 1951), one can give figures only 
on how much water has been pumped. At the present 
time there are approximately 640 services in the Town. 
A service is defined as an individual connection to a water 
main. The figures that follow, then, will be based upon 
the amount of water pumped per service. A large water- 
meter at the pumping station records the rate at which 
water is pumped and gives a total of the amount pumped. 
This meter has been checked against the specifications on 



112 



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the pump and found to be adequate for our present pur- 
poses of estimation. A figure for the average amount of 
water pumped per service over the past 17 years is 230,- 
000 gallons per service per year. It is interesting to note 
that this figure of .230,000 gallons per service per year 
compares with a figure of 100,000 gallons per service per 



WATER SUPPLY 113 

year for Concord, and approximately the same for the 
town of Wellesley. The towns of Wellesley and Concord 
have had individual water meters in operation for a num- 
ber of years. In order to achieve some idea of the influ- 
ence of water meters on consumption, data was acquired 
for 17 years in Concord when the Town had meters on 
all services and these figures were compared with the 
previous 15 years when Concord had no meters. This 
evidence, as indicated by the accompanying graph, shows 
that during the, period after Concord installed water 
meters, the water consumption in the Town was reduced 
by approximately 28 r / ( of its previous value. 

Regarding the data on the amount of water pumped 
in Lincoln over the 17 year period of study, the deviation 
from the average was about plus or minus 10'/. This 
deviation from the average is largely caused by irrigation 
and depends primarily on the rainfall during the months 
of June, July and August. For example, during a very 
wet summer such as 1938, there would be virtually no 
irrigation of lawns or gardens. At that time the water 
consumption was approximately 200,000 gallons per serv- 
ice per year in Lincoln. However, during drier years like 
1941, 1940 or 1950, the consumption went up to 240,000 
gallons. It is also interesting to note that during 1949, 
one of the driest years during this 17-year period, the 
water consumption was only slightly in excess of that for 
1938, the wettest year during this period. This indicates 
that the restriction on irrigation required by the Lincoln 
Water Department had a very considerable effect. It 
should also be noted that the inordinately high water con- 
sumption for the Town of Lincoln as compared with Con- 
cord is not due to irrigation. Information on the Town 
of Wellesley, which has many lawns, indicates that the 
monthly rate of water consumption during a dry sum- 
mer is twice as great during these summer months as 
during the winter months. 

In an attempt to estimate the future demands for water 
in the Town of Lincoln, the accompanying graphs may 
be of interest. Note that the growth of Lincoln has been 




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WATER SUPPLY 115 

virtually constant since 1934 with the exception of the war 
period when in the years 1941 to 1947 there were vir- 
tually no new services added. However, during the period 
after 1947 and up to the present time, the number of 
services added has brought us approximately up to the 
point we would have been had the prewar building rate 
continued. If one then assumes approximately a constant 
rate of growth of Lincoln, these figures indicate that 
the number of services increases approximately 2%% 
per year. Or putting these same figures in other words, 
it will be approximately 28 years before the number of 
services in Lincoln has doubled, if one is willing to as- 
sume that the rate of growth is constant. 

How long will Sandy Pond be adequate? — No cate- 
gorical answers can be given to this question. It could 
be answered with some precision if we knew just how 
many services would be supplied by the Town on Decem- 
ber 31 of each future year. Less precise answers can be 
given on certain reasonable assumptions: 

1. The number of services will not increase at a rate 
much greater than has been true in the immediate past. 
This rate can be reevaluated each year. 

2. The average annual rainfall will not change in the 
foreseeable future. 

3. The average service will not use much more water 
relative to the actual summer rainfall than has been true 
in the past. 

4. Concord's draught on Sandy Pond will not change; 
for purposes of computation, it is taken as one sixth of 
Lincoln's, 

On the above basis it is estimated that we will be just 
in balance at the beginning of 1959. However, if meter- 
ing reduces water consumption by 28% as it has in Con- 
cord, the balance date will be at the beginning of 1971. 
Any further reduction, by repairing leaks in the system, 
should still further postpone the balance date. It is rec- 
ommended that a check of the balance date be made each 



116 



PUBLIC WORKS 



year. This means also a check of the correctness of the 
above four assumptions. 

Barring a drastic sudden change in conditions, at least 
two years warning should always be available before 
the water supply position becomes critical. 

Water Meters. — Since the Town is not generally me- 
tered, the problem of meters is a rather special one. There 
are three significant arguments in favor of meters. 



1000 




65 



1. They appear to be the most equitable way of levy- 
ing the water rates. This does not mean that the present 
method is grossly inequitable but it could hardly avoid 
being in some cases, mildly so, because it allows no scope 
for inevitable changes in water use by consumers. Such 
changes certainly occur. 

2. In spite of some statements to the contrary, we con- 
clude that meters do result in a somewhat lower use of 
water. Concord has held its lowered use for 17 years. 

3. Meters furnish a continuing check on the integrity 
of the physical plant. Ideally the total of water through 



WATER SUPPLY 1.17 

all the meters should be but little less than the total 
pumped. Any gross difference would be a symptom of 
trouble. 

A possibly less significant reason for meters is that 
the' General Court is unlikely to reduce the draught from 
Sandy Pond by Concord until Lincoln is metered. 

The cost of buying and installing meters has been con- 
servatively estimated at $50.00 per house, or $35,000 for 
700 houses. There were 623 un-metered and 12 metered 
users at the end of 1950. Some allowance for new serv- 
ices makes 700 houses an appropriate figure for estima- 
tion. 

If meters were bought and installed serially over a ten 
year period, the annual cost amounting to $3,500 (on 
the assumption of unchanged costs) could be met out of 
current receipts and still leave a safe margin for operat- 
ing expenses and normal replacement and additions. Any 
substantial acceleration of this program would seem to 
require some slowing down of normal replacement or 
higher rates for water, or moderate borrowing. The 
Water Department's action in procuring over 100 meters 
in 1952 as a start on conversion to metered rates has 
been undertaken without borrowing or much increased 
rates as part of normal expansion. 

FINANCIAL 
This section is designed to answer two major questions : 
Where does the Water Department's income come from? 
What is this income spent for? The following statement 
also answers certain other questions. 

The accompanying table sets out the record of receipts 
and expenditures of the Lincoln Water Department for 
the last 15 years. This record is based on the Depart- 
ment's books which are kept on a cash basis, with no 
accounting for outstanding receivables or commitments 
at the end of each year. 

Receipts are mainly received from charges for water. 
The bulk of these is earned on rates based on number 



118 



PUBLIC WORKS 



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WATER SUPPLY 119 

and type of outlets. In the last five years less than $1,000 
each year has been received from some 12 metered serv- 
ices. 

A charge for water connections was levied in 1949 and 
increased in 1950. The number of new connections has 
increased from 19 in 1947 to 32 in 1948, 44 in 1949 and 
29 in 1950. 

Hydrant rental, paid to the Water Department by the 
Town, was reinstituted in 1948, after lapsing in 1934 
when the Water Department joined in the attempt to 
reduce the Town's tax burden in depression. A flat rate 
of $3,000 was charged in 1948, 1949 and 1950 when the 
Town had in use 173, 207 and 209 hydrants respectively. 
The Town's appropriation for 1951 however, was in- 
creased to $3,135 or $15 per hydrant per year, based on 
209 hydrants, which is similar to the charges levied by 
a number of other towns. The justification for any charge 
is that the hydrants and water provided by the Water 
Department to the Town for fire protection should prop- 
erly be paid for in taxes rather than by charges against 
private users. The level of the charge at $15 assumes 
an initial cost of the order of $300 per hydrant and some- 
thing like 25 year replacement. 

Operating expenditures, including power and salaries, 
are only a small portion of total revenues, somewhere 
between a fourth and a third. Power costs have grown 
in recent years with the increase in gallons pumped, but 
variation occurs normally as dry and wet years alternate 
and with them, consumption. 

The major expenses in the period covered by the table 
have been those for additions and replacements. These 
capital expenditures have been made partly for pumping 
facilities, but primarily for water mains. Expenditure 
was held to low levels during the war by unavailability 
of supplies. In consequence, the Water Commission's 
balance reached $26,000 on January 1, 1947. Subsequent 
expenditure in excess of receipts in 1947-1949 completed 



120 PUBLIC WORKS 

the work of replacing most of the 4-inch mains with 
8-inch pipe and reduced the balance on January 1, 1950 
to $3,700. A decline in pipe renewal in 1950 permitted 
some recovery in the balance to January 1, 1951, despite 
$3,900 in legal and engineering fees. 

Expenditures for pumping facilities have been cared 
for as required out of revenue and accumulated surplus. 
The renewal and replacement of pipe has also taken place 
generally out of revenues or accumulated balances. In 
1938, however, the Town borrowed $50,000 with V%% 
10-year serial bonds which was used with surplus and 
a P.W.A. grant of approximately $45,000 to replace 7% 
miles out of the 29.2 miles in the system with large pipe. 
An earlier project in 1937 involving a P.W.A. contribution 
of $13,850 cost the Water Department $17,000, paid for 
out of accumulated balances. The final payment of in- 
terest and amortization of the 1938 bonds on December 
1, 1948, left the Water Department free of debt. 

With present rates, or with a system of metered charges 
which will produce the same general level of revenue, and 
assuming that the present supply of water is adequate, 
the Water Department is in position to continue its pro- 
gram of additions and replacements in the distribution 
system out of current revenues. Thus the extension of 
Town water to new roads, the replacement of 6-inch by 
8-inch and 10-inch pipe, etc., could be undertaken as 
needed on a gradual basis. Should needs of this character 
be low, it. would be possible to reduce rates. Prudent 
financial management would suggest, however, the wis- 
dom of accumulating a substantial balance to meet the 
ultimate capital cost of an expanded water supply. 

If capital expenditures to enlarge the water supply for 
ultimate requirements must be undertaken before a sub- 
stantial surplus has been accumulated, the Water De- 
partment may need to borrow again. Borrowing by the 
Town for the Water Department, by which the Town 
pledges its full faith and credit along with the earning 
capacity of the water system may somewhat increase the 



WATER SUPPLY 121 

acceptibility of the bonds in the capital market. It would 
not encroach on the legal debt limit of the Town because 
water debt is self-sustaining and not met by tax liabilities. 
It is probably safe to assume that the Town could bor- 
row a very considerable sum at 2 percent on 20-year 
serial bonds, of which one-twentieth was paid back each 
year. If this rate can be obtained, the following table 
shows initial, average and final cost to the Water De- 
partment of borrowing different sums: 

COSTS OF BORROWING VARIOUS SUMS 

WITH 2 PER CENT BONDS 

1/20 Repaid Each Year 

Annual Amortization and Interest 
Borrowing Amortization 1st Year Average 20th Year 

$ 50,000 $ 2,500 $ 3,500 $ 3,000 $ 2,550 
$100,000 $ 5,000 $ 7,000 $ 6,000 $ 5,100 
$250,000 $12,500 $17,500 $15,000 $12,750 

The table suggests that the Water Department could 
probably undertake capital expenditures costing $100,000 
without requiring a higher level of income, so long as 
current additions and replacements for the distribution 
and pumping systems remained fairly low. If any sum 
substantially larger than $100,000 were to be borrowed 
and spent, the rate structure would have to be adjusted 
upward to produce a higher level of revenue. Abolition 
of the 10 percent discount now accorded users who pay 
their bills promptly would be a measure to raise a small 
amount of revenue, — perhaps as much as $2,000 a year 
additional, — but would probably somewhat delay col- 
lections. 

The table may further be taken to suggest that any 
capital expenditure much in excess of $250,000 is likely 
to require a drastic increase in water rates or a period 
of borrowing longer than 20 years. Neither alternative 
holds much attraction. Even an increase in rates by 50 
percent, which would raise income initially to the level 
of $30,000 a year, would probably be insufficient to sustain 
interest and amortization charges of $20,000 a year, with- 
out jeopardizing replacement needs. 



122 PUBLIC WORKS 

What of the Future? 

There seems to be no real doubt that there are sig- 
nificant leaks in the system. The first step would be to 
determine their location and render the system tight. 
A loss of 20 % of the water pumped is not abnormal. The 
evidence at hand indicates that our loss is much more 
than this. 

Metering has already been started. It may take longer 
to complete than the first step. The reasons for metering 
have been stated earlier. 

Since the two steps just mentioned might possibly post- 
pone the need of new sources of water beyond the fore- 
seeable future, the attempt to put price tags on new 
sources becomes rather academic. In spite of this, some 
consideration of the cost factors in a new source should 
be useful. There are now in sight four possible new 
sour: — 

1. Wells in southwest Lincoln, near Sudbury river. 

2. Metropolitan District Commission. 

3. Town of Wayland. 

4. Hobbs Brook Basin. 

The following factors will have to be considered in 
making a choice : 

1. Cost of development of the source. This applies only 
to wells, since they do not now exist. 

_ Cost of pumps, motors, pump housings, intakes, 
water treating equipment and incidentals. It is to be 
anticipated that this item will be very nearly the same 
for all sources. 

3. Cost of installing piping between source and Town 
mains. Since longer pipe lines should be of larger diam- 
eter to keep friction losses within reasonable limits, we 
may expect the cost of this item to be larger per mile for 
longer lines. 

^ From any source except our own wells we would 
have to pay for the water itself. The Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission is about to charge $50.00 a million 



WATER SUPPLY 123 

gallons. From Hobbs Brook Basin we feel sure the charge 
would be under $32 a million gallons at this time (Decem- 
ber, 1951). 

5. Cost of operation. Actual power costs and those for 

treating chemicals should not be very different regardless 

of source. 

NOTE: Water from source other than Sandy Pond will al- 
most certainly require sanitary treatment immediately or very 
soon after the source comes into use. How long- Sandy Pond water 
can be used without treatment remains to be seen. Each source 
will need its own treatment equipment and an increase in number 
»1 sources means an increase in supervisory personnel. Hence an 
advantage in the most efficient use of Sandy Pond is evident. 

6. Maintenance costs. As a rough estimate, we may 
put this item at a fixed percentage of the total of items 
2 and 3. 

For the sake of argument, let us assume that competent 
engineering advice says we w T ill eventually use Hobbs 
Brook Basin as a second source. Two actions might be 
undertaken by the Town. 

1. We buy from the City of Cambridge an option allow- 
ing us to draw water from the Basin whenever we wish. 
Obviously a good many questions such as intake location 
and method of determining the price we pay for the water 
would be covered in the option. 

2. We put the line up Trapelo Road in condition to 
act as the main carrying the water into Sandy Pond for 
storage. If the decision were reached early, this second 
action could be carried on over a number of years. 

The possibility of one other action might be canvassed. 
Instead of washing out Concord's right to draw water 
from Sandy Pond by legislative action, might the right 
be bought up ? 

The broad conclusion we may draw is that the water 
situation in Lincoln is anything but hopeless and not im- 
mediately critical ; that several courses of action are open 
to us. 

In spite of the apparent complications of the problem, 
we are sure that w T hen a decision is necessary, all the 
relevant facts as thev stand, can be made clear. 



124 PUBLIC WORKS 

Finally, the undersigned as editor, is wholly responsible 
for the introductory paragraphs, the section on balance 
dates, the first half of that on meters and the section on 
the Future. 

CHARLES H. BLAKE 
February 11, 1952. 



ADDITIONS TO THE REPORT — DECEMBER, 1952 

The very dry summer of 1952 brought us face to face 
with the problem of the main from the pumping station 
to the storage reservoir. Sandy Pond was essentially full 
at the beginning of the drought and dropped its level 
relatively little. The record shows that the pumps were 
run 24 hours a day and delivered the full amount (1 
million gal. /day) to the main and occasionally over that. 
This rate was not enough to keep up with unrestricted 
use, hence the restrictions. 

In its present condition the main will probably be 
adequate longer than present sources. However, the main 
must be adding deposits at an unknown rate. The present 
number of services indicates a restriction on the use of 
water for lawns and gardens about one year in three or 
four. When we come, with additional services, into an 
arithmetical balance the restriction will be necessary 
about two years out of three. This arises from the relation 
between the sizes and frequencies of deficits and surpluses 
in summer rainfall. 

It should be considered that the obvious place to store 
water from any additional source is in Sandy Pond be- 
cause of its capacity and its altitude relative to possible 
sources. This being so, the main from the present pump- 
ing station to the storage reservoir will have to be re- 
placed before any new source can be of real use to the 
Town. 



WATER SUPPLY 125 

The balance dates given in the main report and com- 
puted for December, 1950, were unchanged at the end 
of 1951. 

In late September, 1952, Mr. Sumner Smith handed 
me the meter readings for 17 residential services, cover- 
ing the late winter, spring and summer. This included 
the dry spell. Using these as a basis, I estimate the loss 
from the system to be roughly 46 million gallons a year 
or about 35^ of the water pumped. A full year on a 
larger number of meters will give a better estimate. In 
the late fall of 1952 Messrs. Newmann and E. S. Taylor 
conducted a delicate test of the tightness of the storage 
reservoir. It was witnessed by Messrs. Smith, Gilbert 
and Blake. We concluded that the reservoir is tight. 

CHARLES H. BLAKE 






126 PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of the Superintendent of Streets 

The most troublesome problem encountered in 1951/52 
was ice. Snow was light and was easily handled without 
undue inconvenience to the public, but conditions were 
such throughout the winter that ice formed on the roads 
quickly and frequently. Although the salt spreader pur- 
chased in 1951 was of material assistance in breaking up 
ice on heavily travelled roads, the equipment for spread- 
ing sand to protect traffic after a sudden icing condition 
and when temperatures prevented effective use of salt 
was inadequate to meet the conditions in early 1952. 

The sand spreader, purchased at a cost of $1,650 pur- 
suant to vote and appropriation of the Town under Article 
14 of the 1952 Annual Town Meeting, arrived too late to 
be of use until the winter of 1952/53. Operations so far 
have shown that, as expected, it permits more efficient 
application of sand, for the truck can move faster and 
the sand is spread thinner but more evenly so that more 
miles can be covered before reloading, and only two men 
rather than four are required on the truck. Although 
it is too early to tell how fast it can pay for itself, in- 
creased convenience to the public and safer travel for 
our growing and faster-driving population may be more 
important considerations than an exact determination 
of operating costs. Further observation of this equip- 
ment in use may indicate the advisability of buying 
another sand spreader before another winter. 

Chapter 90 construction to which the State and County 
contribute was limited to completion of Bedford Road 
from approximately the intersection of Bedford Lane to 
Route 2A. The surface applied as specified by the State 
and County has met with such general approval that it 
will be used on Town resurfacing work to a considerable 
extent in spite of the somewhat increased cost. 

The motor equipment now owned is adequate for the 
job. The Ford lVfc-ton Truck and the Chevrolet pick-up 



STREETS 127 

are new and the three White dump trucks bought just 
after the war are in satisfactory condition. The last 
pre-war truck was retired without replacement in 1952. 
It is possible that in 1954 the Town should start replacing 
the White Trucks, all of which are about the same age, 
so that we do not suddenly face the necessity of replacing 
all of them in one year. 

The program of oiling Town roads was continued so 
that the present standard is maintained. This standard, 
however, is fast becoming inadequate and the Town may 
have to face increased highway appropriations. The older 
roads are high-crowned and narrow, leaving inadequate 
room for snow removel which results in complaints from 
citizens and produces hazardous conditions when there 
is ice on the roads. 

There has been unusual comment this winter on snow 
piled in driveways by the Town plows. It is admittedly 
annoying to the resident who wants to keep his own 
driveway open at all times, but so far there has been 
devised no method for removal of snow from narrow 
roads except by moving it to the sides, and a few minutes' 
reflection will indicate the impracticability of either try- 
ing to avoid piling snow in driveways or stopping to 
plow them out. 

It is worth noting that during this period of inflation 
the highway appropriation has increased from $19,365 
in 1941 to only $25,000 in 1953 — an increase of only 
35 % . Probably we are building up a backlog of deferred 
maintenance and improvement which must be met soon, 
but we recognize that during this period increased ex- 
pense of education has made it necessary to reduce all 
such expenses to a point below what they should be. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLIFFORD BRADLEY, 

Acting Superintendent of Streets 



128 PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 

There are three cemeteries under the direction of the 
Cemetery Board : 

1. The Burial Ground behind the Town House which 
was given to the Town by Deacon Samuel Farrar 
in 1760. 

2. The Arbor Vitae Cemetery in the triangle bounded 
by Trapelo Road, Lexington Road and Old Lexing- 
ton Road, purchased by the Town in 1832. 

3. The Lincoln Cemetery on Lexington Road including 
the Old Cemetery, given to the Town by Ephraim 
Flint in 1764, which had previously been a private 
cemetery. 

The remainder of this cemetery was acquired by a gift 
of ten acres from George Bemis in 1883, and by purchase 
by the Town of two more acres in 1927. 

Virtually all of the currently available lots are located 
in the last two acquisitions, which are known as the New 
Cemetery. 

During the past year work on the cemetery grounds 
has been confined largely to regular maintenance involv- 
ing spring clean-up, mowing, and fall clean-up. ' Certain 
soft spots in the roadways have been repaired, and more 
of this work is needed. There is an unexpended balance 
at our disposal for this work, so that no additional ap- 
propriation is needed now. 

Additional lots have been surveyed recently in the New 
Cemetery, making a backlog sufficient to care for the 
Town's needs for several years to come. 

A brief summary of the cemetery regulations may be 
useful to our fellow citizens : 

1. Lots are for sale only to residents of Lincoln. 

2. Lots are sold with the understanding that they may 
be graded immediately at the buyer's expense under 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 1211 

the direction and approval of the Board. 

3. All planting, setting of monuments, and any other 
type of work must be done under the direction of 
the Board. 

4. Owners are encouraged to place Perpetual Care on 
their lots. The minimum amount is $150, but a 
sum amounting to approximately $1.00 per square 
foot of space is suggested for most lots. 

Burials 

January 7, 1952 Aubrey W. Burgess 

January 10, 1952 Caroline Rogers 

January 27, 1952 ...... Anna R. Snelling 

February 11, 1952 Lydia S. Brown 

March 11, 1952 Dora Farrar 

May 8, 1952 Joseph S. Newell 

May 24, 1952 . Hannah A. Benjamin 

July 11, 1952 Iva S. Mann 

July 29, 1952 Edwin B. Rice 

September 9, 1952 .... George Kolys^kin 

October 16, 1952 James Wood 

October 17, 1952 . . . • Elizabeth P. Witherton 

October 24, 1952 Ida M. Metcalf 

October 27, 1952 Joseph Ross Farnsworth 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
JAMES B. BILLINGS, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



Note: For Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds, see Ap- 
pendix. 



130 PUBLIC WORKS 



Inspectors of Building, Plumbing 
and Wiring 

The Inspectors of Buildings, Plumbing and Wiring 
are charged with the responsibility of maintaining the 
standard of construction set by Town By-Laws, State 
Law, and accepted sound practice. Generally speaking, 
no construction, remodeling or alterations of buildings 
may be undertaken until an application has been filed 
and approved by the appropriate inspector who must 
inspect the work from time to time and may order changes 
if the established standards are not being met. All ap- 
plications may be filed at the Town House. 

Building permits issued during 1952 : 

New residential buildings 39 

New non-residential buildings 9 

Alterations and additions 18 

Moving 2 

Tearing down 1 

Fees collected $265.00 

Plumbing permits issued during 1952 67 

Fees collected . . . .$124.00 

Wiring permits issued during 1952 82 

Fees collected $99.50 

Submitted by 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER, Clerk 
NILS P. SWANSON, Building Inspector 

(deceased) 
WILLIAM M. DEAN, Wiring Inspector 
GLENN Y S. CUTTER, Plumbing Inspector 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 131 



Report of the School Building Committee 

The addition to the New School authorized by the Spe- 
cial Town Meeting of June 11, 1951, was substantially 
completed during the year 1952 and should be ready for 
occupancy in January 1953. Parking space for cars has 
been provided to the south of the gymnasium and the 
field to the west has been regraded. This work will not 
be completed until Spring. We believe the Town has 
been fortunate in having the continued architectural ad- 
vice and supervision of the firm of Anderson and Beck- 
with and that the contractor, J. F. 'Rand and Son, has 
provided us with a well constructed building. 

Considerable thought has been given to the accoustic 
qualities of the Assembly Hall-Gymnasium which should 
prove highly satisfactory. We wish to express the Town's 
appreciation to Mr. and Mrs. Pearson Hunt for the gift 
of a fine old weathervane which will be placed above the 
school's main entrance. 

The Committee would like to call to the attention of 
the Town the fact that another addition to the building, 
when built, will leave only slightly more than the original 
Ball Field as play area. This will not be consistent with 
the maintenance of a good diamond for adult use nor will 
the area be adequate for a school of this size. It is our 
feeling that steps should be taken while the land is avail- 
able to acquire additional acreage both for protection of 
the present plant and to provide an adequate recreation 
area for adults and pupils. When this is considered the 
question of access to the school from both Sandy Pond 
and Baker Bridge Roads for pedestrians and bicycles 
must be faced. 

ELIZABETH SNELLING 
ELLIOTT V. GRABILL 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 
PEARSON HUNT 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE 






LsOLicaUon 
ana JVecreaUon 



Report of the Library Trustees 

Lincoln Public Library opens its doors in 1953 for its 
sixty-ninth year. To the older inhabitants of the Town, 
the Library is taken for granted, since during that time 
it has been one of the physical and cultural landmarks 
of the Town. Some watched it being built, and have 
seen its influence on the educational and recreational life 
of the community expand until today it compares favor- 
ably with the libraries of similar towns. 

There are many newcomers to Lincoln in the past few 
years. Some find the Library a pleasant place to spend 
a few hours and marvel at its completeness for a small 
town library ; others expect it to be the counterpart of a 
large city library with complete reference files on every 
subject. Obviously, the latter is impossible; the former 
is complimentary ; something between should be our aim. 

A short history of the Library may be of interest. In 
1798 a group of Lincoln people formed the "Lincoln 
Social Library Society." A committee consisting of the 
Reverend Stearns, a Mr. Hoar, a Mr. Farrar, a Mr. 
Wheeler, and a Mr. Tarbell framed its by-laws. Lineal 
descendants of these men still are benefactors and par- 
ticipants in the Library operations. In 1869 Mrs. Eliza 
Farrar, wife of Professor John Farrar, Lincoln born, be- 
queathed her library as the beginning of a "public library 



LIBRARY 133 

for the inhabitants of Lincoln." George G. Tarbell built 
the present building and gave it to the Town in 1884. 
A true "public library" then came into existence, and 
such it has been since. The deed of gift named three life 
trustees to serve with the then Chairmen of the Select- 
men and School Committee, ex officio. The life trustees 
appoint their successors, and the Chairmen of the Select- 
men and School Committee function with them as trus- 
tees. The librarian is selected by them annually. The 
present librarian, Mrs. Farrar, is the daughter-in-law 
of one of the original life trustees and has ably filled that 
position for twenty-two years. 

The care of the building and the maintenance of the 
library services are part of the educational responsibilities 
of the Town, as are the schools. Each year the trustees 
estimate the financial needs, the Town Finance Com- 
mittee considers them, and the resultant request is voted 
on in Town meeting as are the requests of other depart- 
ments. 

The Town Trust Commissioners have in their care 
approximately $10,000 in funds that over a long period 
of time have been given or bequeathed to the Library. 
None of these funds are very large; several are of $100 
or thereabouts. Each fund represents a desire on the part 
of the donor to do something tangible for the people of 
Lincoln. Most of the larger gifts are for books only, and 
only the income from such can be used. This income 
amounts to about $200 annually and is used. Of a few 
of the gifts the principal may be used, some only for 
books, other for general purposes. The tendency has 
been to utilize the latter for special purposes. 

Throughout 1952 the Library was open three after- 
noons and evenings a week. This seems to have been 
fully justified, since the Librarian's report shows an in- 
creased circulation. The usual maintenance of the in- 
terior and grounds, repairs to the chimneys, cleaning the 
cesspool, etc., have been attended to as well as minor 
incidentals. All of this was handled within the appro- 
priation. 



134 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

A situation that should be met in the not too distant 
future is the fact that the Library is being outgrown. 
Though this has been apparent to the trustees, they have 
realized the need for increased school facilities and the 
resultant strain on Town finances. Nevertheless, the 
Library is a part of the educational structure of the Town 
and its needs should also be considered. 

The Library bookshelves are full ; recently new one 5 
have been added, and there is little room for more. Pos- 
sible conversion of heating from coal to oil can make 
usable otherwise wasted basement space, some of which 
could be converted to a much needed children's reading 
room. This latter is recognized as a real necessity by 
the trustees for several years. It is our hope to make it 
an accomplished fact soon. 

Many friends of the Library have contributed in serv- 
ice, gifts, and exhibits during the year. We are grateful, 
and express our hope that their interest will continue. 
Mr. David Mann has supervised the operation of the 
tower clock; and the Fire Department helped to replace 
the hands. The Garden Club and various individuals have 
placed flowers and interesting exhibits in the book room. 
One juvenile user of the Library made a stool ladder to 
reach the upper shelves. Acknowledgment of the many 
gifts is made in the list following. If any have been 
omitted, it is hoped the oversight will be forgiven. 

Donors +0 the Lincoln Library, 1952 

Mrs. L. B. Anderson Lincoln League of Women Voters 

Rachel Billings Mrs. Walter Love joy 

Mr. C. V. Briggs Mrs. R. S. Meriam 

Mr. Paul Brooks Mrs. Lester Monks 

Laurie Cannon Dr. John P. Monks 

Concord Free Library Allan H. Murphy 

Mr. E. R. Davis Ethan A. Murphy 

Mr. F. W. Denio Stephen E. Murphy 

Mrs. James De Normandie Miss K. O' Sullivan 

Mrs. Robert L. De Normandie Mrs. Roland Robbins 

Mr. R. J. Eaton Mrs. Sumner Smith 

Mrs. N. W. Fradd Rev. C. M. Styron 



LIBRARY 135 

Mrs. John B. Garrison Mr. G. G. Tarbell 

Mrs. H. R. Healey, Jr. Mrs. E. S. Taylor 

Mrs. Stanley Heck Mrs Arthur E. Thiessen 

Mrs. E. W. Herman Mrs. Robert Thorson 

Mrs. Chester Jones Mrs. Henry Warner 

Mr. H. B. Kane Miss Elizabeth F. Wheeler 

Mrs. W. T. King United States Steel Corporation 

Lincoln Garden Club E.I. Dupont deNemours Company 



LIBRARY STATISTICS— 1952 

Number of volumes, January 1, 1952 16,022 

Number of volumes added by gift 135 

Number of volumes purchased 390 

Number of volumes withdrawn 701 

Number of volumes, December 31, 1952 15,846 

Number of borrowers, December 31, 1952. . . . 839 

Number of days open 154 

Amount of fines collected $265.00 

Circulation 

Fiction 6,217 

Non-Fiction 3,107 

Juvenile 7,413 

Periodicals 1,525 



Total 18,262 



138 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Bemis Free Lectures 

The Trustees wish to call to the attention of the towns- 
people that suggestions in regard to programs are always 
welcome. Over a period of time many ideas given to the 
Committee have been the source of excellent lectures. 
There is a conscious effort each year on the part of the 
Committee to provide variety in the content of the pro- 
gram offered to suit the varied interests of the towns- 
people. 

Income and Expenses of the Trustees are shown in 
the report of the Commissioners of Trust Funds. It is 
well to note that the current fees for first class lecturers 
are noticeably higher than in years past, but thlft the 
income remains approximately the same. This fact limits 
the number of lectures the Committee is able to provide. 

Again it should be pointed out that musical programs 
are limited because of the piano in the Town House. 
Perhaps the question of the location of these lectures 
should be discussed by the townspeople and legal advice 
sought as to the possibility of having the lectures in the 
New School in future years. 

The Bemis Mailing List is an address list intended to 
reach all households in Lincoln. The list is available for 
use on the payment of a fee by others in mailings to Lin- 
coln residents. It is now kept at the Town House and 
additions or subtractions should be given to Mrs. Causer. 
It is still requested that permission for its use be asked 
of the Trustees in order to protect Town property and 
the inhabitants of Lincoln. 

CHRISTOPHER W. HURD, Chairman 
LEONARD C. LARRABEE 
MABEL H. TODD 



EXTENSION SERVICE 137 



Report of the Work of the 
Middlesex County Extension Service 

in Lincoln 

The Middlesex County Extension Service is an organi- 
tion maintained by the County in cooperation with the 
University of Massachusetts and the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture to serve the citizens of the 
Town in the field of agriculture and home economics. 
The work is carried on under the guidance of the Town 
director who is assisted by the chairman in homemaking 
and boys and girls 4-H Club work. 

The County office makes farm and home visits to help 
when requested and, in addition, carries on organized 
projects County- wide under the guidance of farmers' 
and homemakers' service on County committees. 

Radio service is maintained weekly on WBZ ; monthly 
on WHDH and five days a week during the summer on 
WKOX. A monthly bulletin with a circulation of 5,000 
is maintained and timely notices of interest to dairymen, 
fruit growers, market gardeners, poultrymen and com- 
mercial florists are sent to anyone as requested. 

Some of the special- activities of local interest follow. 

Dairymen were primarily interested in cooperating in 

the New England-wide Green Pastures Program, the 

ierd Improvement Association, Owner-Sampler 

work and Selective Breeding. 

The Extension Poultry Program in 1952 was keyed to 
help poultrymen and turkey growers to improve the effi- 
ciency of their operations, maintain flock health and take 
better advantage of their marketing opportunities. Ef- 
ere made to provide breeders with information 
which might help them to hold their prominent place in 
the industry and routine service was provided in all 
phases of poultry and turkey farming. 



138 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

George Browning, Jr., of Conant Road, participated in 
the 1952 Middlesex Flock Health Program. 

A spray service is maintained by radio to all fruit 
growers as well as market gardeners. Fruit growers also 
follow closely the weekly twilight meetings held during 
the growing season to keep abreast of production and 
marketing problems. There has been an increased de- 
mand from home owners for information on vegetables, 
flower gardens and lawns. 

Twenty-one boys and girls carried on 4-H activities 
in garden, poultry, livestock and clothing under the lead- 
ership of Mrs. Medford Huntley, Almon Huff and Donald 
Burgess. Local Club members won honors at the County 
Fair. Carleton Huff was the outstanding rabbit exhibitor. 
Laurie Cannon won First on his American chinchillas. 
Hildred Snelling and Marilyn Bloome won First in cloth- 
ing classes. Five girls took part in County Girls' Day 
in Lexington. Ten Club members attended Camp Middle- 
sex. 

$18 in prizes donated by Robert D. Donaldson were 
awarded to Club members doing the best work. The four 
highest awards went to David Donaldson, Carleton Huff, 
Lawrence Cannon and Philip Cannon. 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
Town Director. 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 139 

Lincoln Recreation Committee 

The summer playground continues to attract more 
children each summer. Under the supervision of Mr. 
Edward Czarnowski a full eight week program of diversi- 
fied activities was offered to the children of the com- 
munity on the summer playground. A few of the activi- 
ties enjoyed by all were baseball, softball, kickball, new- 
combe, tumbling, tennis, croquet, horseshoes, volleyball, 
and many other team and individual games. 

An extensive arts and crafts program was carried out 
by our woman director, Miss Nancy Geutch. 

Tournament play in various sports was carried on 
throughout the summer. Many quiet games were offered 
for the younger set. The older boys participated in a 
playground baseball league with the neighboring com- 
munities and the girls played in a softball league with 
the same towns. 

Various trips were taken through the season: a boat 
trip to Provincetown, two visits to the major league base- 
ball games, and two trips to Whalom Park. 

The season closed with a playday. At this time rec- 
ognition was given to those who had won the tournaments 
during the summer. 

The annual spring and fall adult tennis tournament 
continues to attract new players each year and provide 
enjoyment for fans as well as players. 
, Invited by the School Committee to make use of the 
new gymnasium we are planning to try several activities 
during the remainder of this year on an experimental 
basis. If the response is sufficient and cost not too great 
these activities will become a permanent part of a year- 
round program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ASTRID DONAIDSON DAVID TODD 
SADIE SHERMAN WILLIAM DeFORD 

EDWARD ROONEY JOHN GARRISON 

ROBERT GRAY MALCOLM DONALDSON 

ETHAN MURPHY, Chairman 



140 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Report of the Memorial Day Committee 

In accordance with the Vote of the Town Meeting of 
March 3, 1952, Memorial Day Exercises were held on 
May 30, 1952, with appropriate ceremonies at the three 
cemeteries and at the Memorial in front of the Library. 

The exercises concluded with an address by Mr. Wil- 
liam Rand at the Town House. 

The Committee extends its thanks to the Town officials, 
Boy and Girl Scouts organizations and townspeople for 
their cooperation in helping to pay fitting tribute to those 
who served their country in the causes of Freedom and 
Democracy. 



Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. MARY HENDERSON 
MRS. EVERETT SHERMAN 
REV. MORRIS ROBINSON 
E. DONLAN ROONEY 
METRO FEDOCK, Chairman 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM 



141 



Report of the deCordova Museum 

We are happy to report that the DeCordova and Dana 
Museum has continued to make good progress in the last 
year. We should like to thank all those who have con- 
tributed to this progress. 

A more detailed review of the Museum's activities is 
contained in the report of our executive director 



Respectfully submitted, 

The Directors 
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, President 
JANE K. VANCE, Vice President 
PEARSON HUNT, Treasurer 
ELIZABETH SNELLING, Clerk 
CHARLES H. BLAKE 
RICHARD S. MERIAM 
ARTHUR E. THIESSEN 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

St6ff 



Frederick P. Walkey 
Joseph Hodgson 
Nancy Luxford 
Mavis Derby 
Karl Lahnstein 
Floriy Campobasso 
John Witherton 



Executive Director- 
Director of Education 
Assistant to Director 
Registrar 
Building Superintendent 
Caretaker 
Guard 



Perhaps the most significant factor to be considered 
when assessing the importance of any Art Museum is 
the growth of such an institution. This growth can be 



142 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

measured by the actual physical increase of the plant 
itself, or by improved effectiveness in the area which it 
serves. While the buildings of the deCordova Museum 
have remained unchanged, the response by the public 
to our services and the functions have increased tremen- 
dously in the past year. We have every intention of con- 
tinuing to increase our services, wherever possible, over 
larger and larger areas, but each new undertaking by 
the Museum brings us up sharply against a situation 
which makes us more and more dependent on you, our 
present or potential supporters. 

No finer compliment can be bestowed on us than that 
which is made by each individual who becomes an Asso- 
ciate of the Museum. Here is the tangible evidence of 
approval, and each payment makes our hope of expansion 
a greater reality. 

Recently the figures on the number of our Associates 
were published, and the most recent total has reached 
236. This shows an increase of 10 Sustaining Associates, 
33 Professional Associates, and 74 Associate over the 
past year. The figures are most encouraging, but we hope 
to increase the total still further. It is very apparent 
that our future growth must depend on the support of 
many hundreds. The trust income from our benefactor, 
Julian deCordova is not sufficient to cover the activities 
in which we wish to engage if the Museum continues 
to develop as it must. 

A small town cannot support a museum alone. It needs 
the help of all those in the surrounding communities 
whom it serves. Recognizing that we have good friends 
in these surrounding communities, we have instituted an 
advisory committee of citizens from the nearby towns 
around Lincoln to advise us on the particular needs of 
their towns, which might be more effectively served by 
the Museum than by any other existing institution, and 
to help us with public relations. 

The staff at the Museum has seen several changes 
during the past year. Lorena Hart resigned to travel 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM 143 

abroad with her husband. Virginia Slade decided to re- 
tire, and Mrs. Sheldon Briggs, part-time clerical assistant, 
left for full-time employment. Now two new people have 
come to the Museum. Mrs. Mavis Derby has taken over 
the position as Registrar, Mrs. Nancy Luxford is the 
Assistant to the Director, who, along with her office 
duties, will take charge of publicity and act as member- 
ship secretary. 

This report would not be complete without special 
thanks and recognition to Karl Lahnstein, Floriy Cam- 
pobasso and John Witherton, who are responsible for 
the appearance of the Museum and Park. No institution 
can surpass us in this. It is a source of great pride to 
all who work at, or are associated with the Museum. 

The change-over in staff is perhaps the best indication 
of the rapid growth of the Museum. One office can no 
longer handle the diverse functions peculiar to this in- 
stitution. The School now requires a full-time Registrar, 
who, in addition, also handles all financial matters and 
serves as librarian. The Museum office, thus freed from 
the School, will be able to do a more consistent job with 
publicity and can undertake and promote special func- 
tions, such as concerts, movies, and lectures. 

The School 

The growth of the Educational program of the Museum 
has been most encouraging. The classes continue to ex- 
pand, and each term we have been able to offer more and 
more diversity of subjects. The Fall term of 1952 saw 
the largest enrollment in the children's classes of any 
since the program was first instituted, the total of reg- 
istrations reaching 315. This compares significantly with 
the enrollment figure of 250 in 1951, and with 150 in 
1950. When we consider that the registrations from the 
Town of Lincoln have remained about the same for the 
past three years, it becomes apparent that the services 
which the Museum renders to the surrounding communi- 
ties is needed and appreciated. 



144 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Increased enrollment in the adult classes has also been 
apparent. More than 160 registered in the fall term in 
the courses in water color, oil painting, drawing, block- 
printing, jewelry and silver smithing, sculpture, ceramics 
and music appreciation. 

Such enrollment figures are in a large measure due 
to the excellence of the outstanding teaching staff. The 
young, enthusiastic group of instructors, most of them 
artists in their own right, are under the supervision of 
Joseph Hodgson, Director of Education. Those of you 
who have taken classes will already be familiar with the 
names of Merrilyn Delano, Florence Hollingsworth, Rob- 
ert Grady, Marion Weston, Barbara Ahern, Lois Tarlow, 
Paula Graham, and Kalman Novak. The entire group 
receives our sincere praise and commendation for carry- 
ing out the Museum program so effectively. 

In the Fall of 1952, an organizational meeting of the 
deCordova Camera Club was held, and since then the 
Club has grown, through the efforts of its chairman, 
Robert Brown of Lincoln, into an energetic group of 
fifteen who meet biweekly at the Museum. 



Exhibitions Program 

The Museum's exhibition program for 1952, presents, 
in retrospect, an interesting array of great variety. A 
total of 30 special exhibitions were held beginning in 
January with an invitation watercolor show by many 
of New England's outstanding artists. This exhibition 
"With A Sable Brush" received excellent press notices 
for its scope, ninety paintings, its variety and quality. 
Two other large group .shows,, the annual exhibition of 
the New England Chapter of Artists Equity in March 
and the traveling portion of the Boston Independent Art- 
ists Exhibition, both regional in character, provided our 
visitors with a cross section view of the many current 
trends, ■ styles, and approaches of most of the region's 
better artists. '■'■-■ - :■:-:-: 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM 145 

Sculpture was presented by four one-man shows and 
a group show. The sculptors' search for form through 
the increasing use of unconventional mediums was amply 
demonstrated in a choice selection from the New England 
Association for Contemporary Sculpture. The one-man 
presentations included those of Alfred Duca and Peter 
Abate, Daniel Kornblum and Charles Chase. Variety in 
sculpture was achieved with the diverse efforts of Korn- 
blum, who works with driftwood and depends heavily 
on nature's vagaries, to Chase, who went directly to nature 
for inspiration, carving birds with great skill and ad- 
mirable craftsmanship. 

For further demonstration of our unceasing support 
of the local artists, the always popular annual exhibition 
of the Boston Printmakers was held in November. Other 
drawing and print exhibits were held, including a re- 
freshing and appealing display of linoleum cuts by Elaine 
B. Livingston. Twenty prints from this exhibit were sold, 
a record to date for any one show. Crafts shown included 
jewelry, silver, ename's and hand woven textiles. 

The month of May was given over to the camera artists 
in New England when the Museum sponsored a New 
England-wide juried contest entitled "New England, a 
Photographic Interpretation." Jules Aarons, who was at 
that time photography instructor at the Museum, was 
chairman of the exhibition which was comprised of sev- 
eral sections: one from the Library of Congress, one 
from Standard Oil, a group of five selected New England 
photographers, and finally the entries to the contest. 
American Photography carried a feature story on this 
exhibition as did the New York Times, which sent its 
photography editor to cover the event. 

The ten one-man painting exhibits were climaxed by 
one of the Museum's most important efforts. With loans 
from museums, collectors and the Rosenberg Gallery in 
New York, the Museum was able to present the work of 
Karl Knaths, one of America's foremost artists. We 
thank all the individuals and institutions who contributed 



146 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

to the 1952 exhibitions, for without their help the pro- 
gram as outlined would not have been possible. 

Each year we come closer to fulfilling our promise of 
making the Museum a cultural center with sufficient 
variety in its program to attract everyone occasionally. 
The program for 1953 promises to be lively and instruc- 
tive, as we have scheduled for March an exhibition from 
the Corning Glass Museum called 'The History of Ameri- 
can Glass." This will be followed in April by the annual 
Massachusetts Crafts Exhibition, which proved so pop- 
ular at the Worcester Museum last year. They both war- 
rant your attention, and a visit to the Museum. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERICK P. WALKEY 
Executive Director. 



School (yommltt 



ee 



Jveport 



to the 



Csown of biYLcoln 



For The School Year 1951 - 1952 



148 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



School Calendar 1953-1954 

September 7 — Monday Labor Day 

8 — Tuesday Staff Organization and 

Workshop 
9 — Wednesday ..... School Opens 

October 12 — Monday .. Columbus Day Recess 

November 11 — Wednesday Armistice Day Recess 

12 — Thursday Annual Open House 

26-27 — Thursday-Friday Thanksgiving Recess 

December 23 — Wednesday Christmas Vacation, Closing 

January 4 — Monday School Resumes 

February 19 — Friday ~ Winter Vacation, Closing 

March 1 — Monday „ School Resumes 

19 — Friday Teachers' Visiting Day 

April 16 — Friday .. Spring Vacation, Closing 

26 — Monday School Resumes 

May 31 — Monday Memorial Day 

June 16 — Wednesday Summer Vacation, Closing 

18 — Friday Commencement 

21-25 — Monday-Friday Staff Organization 



ADDITIONAL CALENDAR DATA 

It is planned to continue the policy of no school on 
Wednesdays for Grade 1 children through November 12, 
1953. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will re- 
verse on February 1, 1954. 

Staff Meeting Half -Days will be the second Wednesday 
of each month except September, December, and June. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 149 



Organization 



Term 
Expires 

MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, Chairman „ 1953 

(MRS.) LUCY E. BYGRAVE 1954 

ERNEST P. NEUMANN 1955 

MEETINGS: Regular: First Tuesday of each month; 7:30 

p.m. at the Superintendent's office. LI 
6-0333. 
Called: Third Tuesday of each month usually 
and other meetings as stated; time and 
place designated. 

Superintendent of Schools 

ANDREW J. MANGES, Lincoln Road, LI 6-0103-J 
Office at New Elementary School, LI 6-0333 

Secretary to Superintendent 
SOLVAY G. VALENTINE, Lexington . - 

Building Principals 

ROBERT B. PATCH, Dunstable 
New Elementary School, LI 6-0333 

LOUIS J. SAPIENZA, Everett 
Center School, LI 6-0462 

Clerk — Center School 

(MRS.) EDITH W. HARVEY, Weston Road 

Office Hours 

School Days — 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
School Vacation — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

No-School Signals 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system: 
7:10 a.m. '.\-.\-'-\ repeated at 

7:15 a.m. 3-3-3 

Radio station announcements will be read between the 
period 6:30 and 7:30 A.M. On stormy mornings, if con- 



150 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

venient, tune in on two or more stations since it is not 
always possible to get messages through to several sta- 
tions in the brief time allotted us. Please refrain, too, 
from tying up local phone lines to school officials and 
bus operators during the morning hour, 6:30-7:30. We 
try to contact all of the following when it is necessary 
to announce "No School :" 

WBZ _ 1030K WHDH - 850K 

WEEI 5 9 OK WNAC 1250K 

If an announcement is read, "No School — All Schools" 
it will mean that no buses will operate and high school 
pupils will govern themselves accordingly. Announce- 
ments refering to Lincoln and merely stating "No School" 
will apply to elementary pupils only. 

During extremely stormy or cold weather, parents are 
urged to exercise their own judgment in sending the 
younger children. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 151 



Report of the School Committee 

To the Town of Lincoln : 

In 1947 Lincoln had two school buildings, the Center 
School and "the little red school house" in the south part 
of the Town. The latter belongs to the Codman estate, 
and under terms of the will the building can be used by 
the Town only for public school purposes. Elementary 
school enrollment in October, 1947 was 259 pupils. Some 
classrooms had thirty-five or more pupils, and there was 
much agitation for a new building. It was forecast that 
the enrollment would be 300 by 1949. 

At last the new building was constructed and opened 
in the fall of 1949 with an enrollment of 347. The South 
School was then closed. The problem of what to do with 
the Center School took care of itself as all rooms in that 
building were still needed for the large primary classes, 
which were divided to provide more individual instruc- 
tion for the younger children. 

By the fall of 1951 enrollment had reached 384 pupils, 
and the need for still more classrooms, in the near future, 
was becoming obvious. The New School addition was 
voted that year. In the meantime, to provide for the en- 
rollment of 445 pupils in the fall of 1952, the South 
School was reopened and the former shop room in the 
Center School was equipped as a classroom. We expect 
to move into the new addition in February, 1953. In the 
meantime, enrollment has reached the new high of 453. 
At this rate, it will require the registering of two more 
in-coming classes and we will have doubled the enrollment 
of five years ago. 

Hence it is obvious why our budget has risen and risen 
fast. More pupils mean more teachers, more books, more 
supplies, and more school buses. More classrooms mean 
more janitor service, more supplies, and more main- 
tenance. We now have 22 teachers compared to 11 



152 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

teachers five years ago. To attract good teachers our 
salary schedule has been raised. As a result our staff 
has many capable teachers and the rate of turnover 
among them has been reduced. Today experienced teach- 
ers are not only coming to us, but, once added to the 
staff, they are staying with us, thereby making it pos- 
sible to establish a plan of teaching with some continuity. 
The Lincoln Schools are becoming less and less a training 
ground for young teachers looking for a year or two of 
teaching experience before applying for a position in the 
larger school systems of the metropolitan area. 

Increased enrollment has put a strain on our transpor- 
tation facilities. As new houses appear about town, more 
miles must be covered to gather more pupils, all this in 
the same number of minutes in the morning. In the near 
future we may ask more pupils to walk further to bus 
stops or to school buildings. Two old buses have just 
been replaced to insure reliable service. We have finally 
abandoned the old, complicated bus contracts, under 
which we have been operating, wherein the Town bought 
the buses. We have adopted a type of contract with bus 
operation on a straight mileage basis with the contractor 
supplying everything required to provide the service. 

As the school plant increases in size it becomes neces- 
sary to make further provisions for operation and main- 
tenance. The 1953 Budget shows a considerable increase 
in these departments. The former has to do with the 
new addition, while the latter provides for care of the 
Center School. Maintenance of this building has been 
too long neglected. The roof, gutters, and coping need 
attention. All outside trim needs painting. Doors and 
windows need glazing and caulking. To provide for ade- 
quate maintenance and equipment of buildings we have 
now set up a five year plan which should lighten the 
burden for any one year. 

At this time we would like to mention the secondary 
school problem we may soon be facing. The large classes 
which have slowly been advancing through the elemen- 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 153 

tary grades will soon reach the high school level. This 
applies to other towns as well as Lincoln, and there is 
a question how long Concord and Weston will be 
able to accommodate our students in their high schools. 
Regional high schools are being talked of more and 
more, high schools which would be supported by two or 
more adjacent towns. More than a year ago we met with 
the School Committees of Weston, Wayland, and Sudbury 
on several occasions for general discussion of this prob- 
lem. So that we may be fully posted on current develop- 
ments we are apointing a committee to study the regional 
high school problem and to consult with the proper au- 
thorities in nearby towns. 

Outside our own immediate Lincoln School activities, 
the School Committee has attended several meetings 
sponsored by the New England School Development 
Council, thereby enabling ourselves to keep abreast of 
current thinking and to discuss with other School Com- 
mittees problems similar to our own. In February, we 
were invited by NESDEC to send a representative to 
help plan the agenda of the annual spring meeting in 
Cambridge. Other committeemen came from Connecticut, 
New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. We were pleased 
to have our town and schools so recognized. 

In March, the superintendent was granted a short 
leave of absence to attend the Annual Meeting of Elemen- 
tary School Principals at the University of Massachusetts 
where he had been invited to participate as a panel 
consultant. He also represented our schools at the Annual 
Meeting of the American Association of School Ad- 
ministrators held in Boston last April. 

The Committee would like to acknowledge the splendid 
cooperation of the teaching staff and the untiring efforts 
of the Superintendent to establish and maintain a good 
school system. We are grateful to the townspeople for 
their support. Some would undertake more than we have 
done; others feel we are extending ourselves too far. 



15 1 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Actually we are trying to establish a sound school pro- 
gram, which will enable our children to compete success- 
fully and live happily in the years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
MALCOLM L. DONALDSON, 

Chairman 
(MRS.) LUCY E. BYGRAVE 
ERNEST P. NEUMANN 



Report of the Superintendent of Schools 

It is a pleasure to submit my fifth annual report for 
the Lincoln Public Schools, the sixty-second in the series 
of Superintendent's annual reports. The format follows 
that pattern established last year in which subject and 
activity areas are reported as separate departments. 

In Retrospect 

Organization and Personnel — Judging from the ques- 
tions and comments heard from time to time it is alarm- 
ing to conclude that familiarity with local school organiza- 
tion, program, and personnel is so limited. This report 
seeks to set forth a few facts as simply as possible. 

Looking back over the past half decade or so we see 
numerous changes in organization and personnel. These 
may be ascribed to the impact of community growth and 
the emerging role of twentieth century education. Em- 
phasis placed on the individual learner has required an 
expansion in extent and variety of activities designed to 
promote growth. Special areas of the curriculum have 
been given particular attention. These have resulted in the 
appointment of full time personnel and the necessary 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 155 

budgeting provisions enabling the development of the 
subject. This applies especially to music, art, shop, 
physical education, and remediation, with due attention 
to accelerated as well as latent learners. 

Reorganization is in order when it helps to solve a 
temporary problem or meets the needs of a class or 
grade. For example, the departmental plan was intro- 
duced and extended to the sixth grade for several reasons. 
Not the least of these reasons was to minimize the 
number of preparations required of the straight-grade 
teacher. The plan provides more time and continuous 
contact with a subject, thus enabling the instructor to 
develop a wider range of activities and projects designed 
to challenge pupils at all levels in a given class. 

When it became apparent last year that one first grade 
was showing unsatisfactory achievement in reading, the 
normal homeroom division of the grade was altered. 
Learning to read was given particular attention by 
making it possible for one teacher to be released from 
the usual grade activities, in order to concentrate on the 
reading needs of each child. As mentioned in my report 
for last year, this plan brought excellent results, 

A few years ago music classes were divided on the 
basis of sex rather than age, grade, or ability level due 
.to complications arising from teacher-pupil maladjust- 
ment. At the present time these classes are organized in 
mixed groups by grade levels. 

Staff membership has grown from 11 in 1943 to 22 this 
year. Enrollment figures may be found elsewhere in this 
report. However, their significance may justify repeti- 
tion of the fact that elementary pupil enrollment has 
increased from 259 in 1947 to as many as 461, at one time, 
in late 1952. 

Mere figures, however, leave a lot to the imagination. 
For example, while the staff has been doubled in number 
during the past ten years, the percentage rate of teacher 
turnover has fluctuated from sixteen to eighty-two, as 
the following table shows. 



156 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 





l-.JA 


|2 19< 


3 19 


TEACHE 

*4 1^45 19^ 


* Tl 

16 19< 


IRNC 

7 19- 


)VER 

♦8. 1949 1950 iQfil iqJU 


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70* 
60* 




























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Under the subject of Testing and Remediation will be 
found the results of achievement testing. In spite of the 
special attention that has been given the current seventh 
grade, the general achievement is somewhat below grade 
level, hence, there is reason for our continued concern. 
Psychological testing has revealed that this class is not 
unlike the usual run of classes in our schools. Test results 
show the group to be above average. Unchallenged con- 
clusions may not be drawn from the results of a testing 
program since there are so many other factors which 
influence those results. Nevertheless, it is interesting 
to note that at the time of highest incidence of teacher 
turnover this class was in the primary grades. The 
median incidence was fifty per cent. Staff turnover does 
not occur in an isolated way. How serious may be the 
effect generally, in addition to the effect on a particular 
class, is debatable. It does manifest itself in the concern 
of parents for particular class assignments, as evidenced 
by the frequency with which this subject has been the 
basis for a school visit or other form of communication. 
Such concern is readily understandable, though it is not 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



157 



likely to be as serious as, at first glance, it appears. 
There are certain commitants of maturity. One of 
these is the ability to summon apparently non-registered 
knowledges and undeveloped abilities. This is borne out 
in the recorded achievement of our Grade 10 students 
in Weston High School. There may be some doubt as to 
the effectiveness of the Lincoln elementary school pro= 
gram, but Table II indicates that these fears are not 
too well founded. 







o 5: 

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££ 

Ok i> 

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Table II discloses that the class average in New Eng- 
land Schools 50 percentile was at 12.7 while the national 



158 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

scores percentile was at 13.0. Weston Grade 10 average 
percentile was 3.4 above the national scores and 3.7 above 
New England scores. The Lincoln Grade 10 pupils in 
Weston (7 cases, scoring 18.9) was 2.5 better than Wes- 
ton; 5.9 better than the national average and 6.2 better 
than the New England average. Only one Lincoln pupil 
was at or near the Weston average ; all others were above. 
Again, let us remember that these data prove nothing; 
however, certain inferences may be drawn. 

More of such comparative statistics need to be collected 
as they relate to all of our high school students, but even 
these have certain implications. 

Plant and Operation — Five years ago the two buildings, 
Center and South Schools, kept one custodian busy due 
to the distance between them and their respective needs. 
South School consisted of two nice, large, fairly well- 
lighted classrooms. Heating was by an oil-burning boiler. 
The grounds needed improvement and they still need 
it. The major problem was toilet facilities, aggravated 
by water lines that had become so filled over the years, 
that water barely managed to seep through. 

We have used South School ; moved out and loaned it 
to the Lincoln Nursery School, Inc. ; moved back and 
plan to move out again very soon. This pattern of recent 
years appears to have established itself and may be 
repeated in the near future. Three years ago the water 
lines were replaced. This improved the toilet conditions. 
However, it is likely that South School will be called on 
again and again in the next decade while the problems 
of providing adequate high school education and meeting 
the challenges of the Town's "growing pains" are being 
considered. In view of this conclusion it appears prudent 
to renovate as and when needed, avoiding postponements.. 

Center School is an unusually well constructed building. 
Despite a limited maintenance program over the years 
since 1908, this building is in remarkably good condition. 
Five years ago all eight classrooms (counting the small 
long, and narrow former library room) were in constant 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 159 

use. Even so, conditions were such as to require screen 
partitioning of the two rooms at South Schohol in order 
to use them as four classrooms. The heating- system 
consisted of steam heat supplied by two coal burning, 
hand-stoked boilers. Very rarely were they in use simult- 
aneously. Lighting was good as school lighting went at 
that time; classrooms were in the process of being 
brightened through the application of paint with higher 
light-reflecting qualities; the toilet facilities were un- 
satisfactory. 

To date, the rooms have been repainted. Toilet facilities 
have been improved, though they need further attention. 
A No. 2 oil-burning boiler has been installed. This has 
aided materially in the effort to maintain a more uniform 
building temperature. All classroom floors of wood have 
been sanded, sealed, and waxed. Two classrooms have 
linoleum or tile floor coverings and two classrooms, the 
office and the former library room have cold cathode light- 
ing thereby improving this factor between one hundred 
and two hundred per cent. 

During this five-year period the New School came into 
existence with its kindergarten, six classrooms, shop, 
music, teachers' room, health unit, and office space. At 
this writing, the addition to the new building nears com- 
pletion, and occupancy appears probable about February 2, 
1953. Our plant facilties will then consist of twenty 
classrooms, a kindergarten, a general purpose room at 
Center, offices, a health unit, teachers' rooms, music, 
shop, lunchroom, and a combined auditorium-gymnasium. 
South School, with two classrooms, will remain in a 
stand-by status. Our outside play areas will be quite 
adequate. 

During this same period our program has been aug- 
mented by addition to staff and equipment. To those 
things mentioned in the foregoing paragraphs may be 
added : 

Tape Recorder 

2 Film Strip projectors 



160 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Film Strip Library 

Bioscope 

Microscope 

Reading accelerator 

Extension of shop opportunities as far as grade four 

Providing a course in Human Relations 

Development of the rhythm and instrumental phases 

of the music program 
Remediation and testing 
Emphasis of physical education 
High School Visiting Day for eighth graders 
Completed initial stages and first printing of a local 

course of study 

Personnel— The following teachers resigned at the 
close of the 1951-52 school year: Martha H. Booth, Music; 
Eleanor F. Sullivan, Grade V; Ruth jane Robitaille, Grade 
III; Judith C. Weaver (second semester), Grade II. Of 
these, two left with their husbands who had received 
appointments out of state, one for personal reasons, and 
one to assume family responsibilities. 

New appointments included Elizabeth B. Fenno, Grade 
IV; Nancy J. Heaton, Grade III; Prudence Morey, Grade 
V; Jane R. Owen, Kindergarten; Spero Pappas, Science; 
Jean C. Scott, Music and Robert B. Patch, Principal and 
Math. Four of these were replacements, two were addi- 
tions to staff, and one made it possible to assign a teacher 
to full time work in physical education, sports, and recrea- 
tion. 



The Years Ahead 

Two tasks now face the Town. One, painful as it may 
be to admit, is an "adult education program" covering 
three areas: (1) Understanding of the organization, cur- 
riculum, and administration of the local educational plan, 
in all of its aspects ; (2) Re-educating or re-training 
adults in terms of services and the costs thereof which 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 161 

will determine the extent of restrictions that may be 
required as the schools expand and budgets increase; 
(3) An awareness of all that constitutes the emerging 
role of public education as it affects the political, relig- 
ious, economic, and social aspects of our culture. The 
last is essential in order that freedom-loving people may 
make intelligent choices in the selection of those desirable 
developments being borne along in the stream of educa- 
tional and social science research. 

Much of this may be accomplished through the pro- 
gram of the Lincoln School Association begun in the fall. 
The outcomes of this study, an inquiry into the status 
of the curriculum of the elementary schools, may point 
toward further courses of action which may aid material- 
ly in solving this problem. In this connection, studies 
performed by this organization, the League of Women 
Voters, and other delegated groups should have consider- 
able impact on this problem and on the task mentioned 
in the following paragraphs. 

The second major task is to provide adequate high 
school education for the young people of Lincoln. This 
is a job to be done in the immediate future. It will re- 
quire conscientious, intelligent, cooperative effort on the 
part of local individuals, committees, and larger groups, 
it will succeed only to the extent that calculated risks 
may be defined from data provided by us and those who 
would launch such an enterprise with us. 

Based on experience and familiarity with the plans 
which have unfolded in recent years in neighboring com- 
munities, it would appear desirable to effect a coalition 
with some one or more towns very soon. Without going 
into statistical analysis as a basis for the proposal it 
appears to the writer that there are sufficient common 
factors existing between ours and one neighboring com- 
munity to warrant overtures intended to result in a prac- 
tical regional high school plan. A quick projection of the 
current enrollment will disclose that our high school 
population may exceed 200 by 1958. Such a figure con- 
tains no allowance for drop-outs occurring prior to grade 



162 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

nine (which amount to nearly 20 per cent) or increased 
enrollments, which, as they affect total enrollment figures, 
amount to about 23 per cent. It should be recalled that 
all recent predictions of future enrollments have been 
underestimated by from three to five years. Interestingly 
enough, the Report of the John Ii. Pierce Park Commit- 
tee, submitted to the Town in 1931, estimated a total 
school population of 546 in 1950 which is within two of 
our total for 1952 — a good nineteen-year guess. An 
enrollment of 200 pupils would be equivalent to one-half 
of the enrollment considered necessary to warrant a high 
school. If our present growth continues, and every indica- 
tion is that it will exceed the current rate, our facilities 
in the process of completion will have to be expended by 
the early 1960's, assuming that South School had relieved 
the bulge sometime earlier. It is conceivable that an 
adequate high school plant would be constructed such 
that, in the initial stages of its occupancy, there would 
be extra classroom space. Such space might be utilized 
by our own upper grades, creating a 6-6 plan thus giving 
some relief locally. At such time as the high school en- 
rollment would require the extra classrooms, we should 
have provided for our local needs and the organization 
would shift from the K-6-6 to a K-6-3-3 or to that K-8-4 
plan under which we now function. 

Tapering off of school expenditures may be expected 
to the extent that the following factors permit: 

1. Broadening and enriching the curriculum, especially 
developing the manual arts, home arts, physical 
education, and health programs. 

2. Wider community use of the plant facilities at the 
expense of the school budget. 

3. Needs for additional staff personnel determined by 
program expansion. 

4. Revision of transportation policies. 

5. State regulations as they affect teachers' minimum 
salaries and the enforcement of currently existing 
permissive legislation, particularly as it relates to 
health and safety. 






SCHOOL COMMITTEE 163 

6. Rising tuition rates at neighboring high schools. 

7. A functional plan for maintenance (renovations, 
repairs, and replacements) which was introduced in 
the 1952 Budget. 

As the economy stabilizes, school costs should tend 
to level off, since the fundamental requirements will have 
been met and improvements generally may be expected 
without a disproportionate increase in cost. Elsewhere in 
this report comparative data will indicate that the Town 
is getting a high return on its per pupil cost when it is 
recalled that our children compete most favorably with 
other pupils in the high schools of their choice. (See 
Table III.) 

Transportation is no small factor in the increasing cost 
of our public schools. Even so, it may be a very small 
price to pay when one considers the safety of the children 
being transported versus the threatening hazards to 
children afoot on our numerous, narrow, winding streets. 
To provide safety for a sudden increase in the foot traffic 
could require alarming increases in other Town budgets ; 
namely, the police and highway departments. 

In closing, I should like to express my appreciation to 
the entire staff, the secretaries, the custodians, the school 
nurse, the local clergy, and the various departments of 
the Town for their cooperation which has had its effect 
on the success of the past year. More specifically, I want 
to thank those staff members, friends, committees, and 
other groups who have gone beyond the obligations of 
mere membership or organization status in their efforts 
to insure the success of the local educational program. 
Finally, I would express my appreciation to the School 
Committee, individually and severally, for its friendly, 
cooperative help and guidance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANDREW J. MANGES, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



164 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Reporf of the Principal — New School 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Four months of activity are hardly enough to gain 
familiarity with the program and procedures in effect. 
It has, however, been sufficient to gain considerable 
respect for the quality of education in the Lincoln Schools. 

In our effort to train the whole child, a second set of 
3 R's is taking its place alongside the traditional Reading, 
'Riting, and 'Rithmetic. This second set has been listed 
as including Responsibilities, Rights, and Relationships 
with other people. In our homeroom organizations, Safe- 
ty Patrol, Student Council, student-run convocation pro- 
grams, and what might be classed as extracurricular ac- 
tivities, we are attempting to provide opportunities actual- 
ly to practice these newer 3 R's. Pupils, especially in the 
Junior High Grades, are capable and desirous of taking 
an active part in the running of their school. Only by 
having opportunities to practice democratic living in their 
school can our pupils learn that citizenship with social 
concern which they will use in later life. 

The number and quality of our convocations have been 
limited by the lack of facilities in the Music Room. We 
look forward to the time when the facilities of the addi- 
tion will be available for our use. As we become familiar 
with the facilities our convocations will become a more 
valuable part of our educational program. 

With the addition of grade 4 to the New School, a total 
of 220 pupils will be housed in one plant. Without making 
any allowance for pupils new to the Lincoln system, we 
can look forward to 245 pupils in Septmber, 1953. 

Certainly, the task of providing the best possible educa- 
tional program for so many pupils will require the con- 
tinued best efforts of our splendid faculty. As we look for- 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 165 

ward to the challenge of the new year, may I take this op- 
portunity to express my thanks to the staff and pupils for 
their excellent cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. B. PATCH 



Report of the Principal — Center School 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Each year a new group of beginners comes to enroll 
in the schools which the Town provides for them. They 
come gaily, confidently, happily, shyly, and longingly into 
this new world to which they have looked forward. We 
are duty bound to provide for them the best start in 
school that is possible, 

"Well begun is half done" is an old adage which is 
never more true than when applied to the education of 
children. I recall reading this somewhere and feel that 
it is the theme to which the staff at Center has become 
dedicated. One major stride was made toward this end 
by the return of a greater number of Center teachers 
than we had heretofore experienced in my short term 
in Lincoln. Progress and growth toward any end can be 
achieved only by continuity of purpose and endeavor. The 
type of continuity necessary in education demands a 
permanence in ideas which can be gained through a well- 
knit staff, orientated and acquainted with the objectives 
and attitudes which the parents in Lincoln expect their 
children to attain in their schools. 

In the school year 1951-52 a program in reading for 
the second grade was put into effect which was aimed at 
negating a deficiency in that area which was brought to 
our attention through the achievement testing of the 
previous school year. This plan was explained in the 
1951 Town Report in the Superintendent's Annual Report. 
The program is not in effect this year since the objective 



166 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

was reached — chiefly to give the children (that 2nd 
grade in particular) a good start in school. That the 
program was a success was borne out by our testing in 
the spring of 1952. 

With the return of familiar faces, 1952 saw the start 
of regularly scheduled holiday programs at Center School 
with the responsibility for them shared by the teacher 
and the program taking place at the Town House. 

A safety patrol was inaugurated in 1952 with added 
inspiration from the Town's Chief of Police. January, 
1953, will see the installation of a new safety patrol made 
up entirely of third grade children. 

Visual aids have been introduced quite extensively in 
the form of film strips. A complete library has been pro- 
vided covering many areas and subjects for grades I- VIII. 
The new year will see the addition of many more film 
strips. The use of the motion pictures in the classroom 
will assume its place again in our program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS J. SAPIENZA 



Art 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Some of our general aims in our art program through- 
out grades 1-8 for 1952 were: to encourage free expres- 
sion realistically and imaginatively by reliving past ex- 
periences, reading stories and listening to music; to 
enable the individual to be creative by giving individual 
help and a variety of media for expression ; to encourage 
the individual to develop the ability to work with his 
hands ; to encourage group participation for social de- 
velopment; and to realize the importance of art in our 
daily life as a means of communication and as a means 
of enriching ourselves and our community. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 167 

In that part of our program where we have encouraged 
individual and group work, results have been very re- 
warding. To cite some instances, we can remember this 
years fifth grade executing more stained glass windows 
to enhance the entrance of our new school, or the com- 
bined efforts of the seventh and eighth graders in paint- 
ing all the scenery for the "Gondoliers." 

But we should not forget the many opportunities we 
have had to work together in the lower grades too. In 
grade 3, the children saw marvelous results in their efforts 
as a class working on the Nativity scene for Christmas. 
There was also, in this one project, opportunity to work 
with their hands in constructing figures from clay and 
construction paper, to learn to paint on clay, and to 
develop the ability to understand depth, contrast, and 
composition. 

In grades 1-3 the children were given more freedom 
to express themselves, and though there was direction in 
teaching a new medium or a phase of art, no formal 
adult standards were imposed on them. Then they were 
given such media as crayons, poster paint, clay, papier 
mache, construction paper, finger paint, yarn, and buttons 
to enable them to try different means of expression, 

There was added emphasis in grades 4-5-6 on keeping 
the individual free to express himself, for now it became 
apparent that as the child was maturing and becoming 
more aware of his inability to create realistically, he was 
losing confidence in his work. Individual assistance was 
more necessary, and group work in figure and animal 
drawing renewed some confidence in the individual's 
ability to draw. More media — such as charcoal, pastel, 
frescol, watercolors, stick and potato printing — were 
introduced for further encouragement in self-expression. 

Wood blocks and linoleum block printing and stenciling 
were successfully used in the seventh and eighth grades 
where the children were able to understand and execute 
more difficult media. 



168 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Other projects, including advanced study in design and 
color, and art appreciation in the form of reports and 
slide lectures, were also carried out at this level. 

Our art exhibit in April evidenced a fulfillment of our 
aims and objectives. Although many of the projects 
could not be exhibited due to insufficient space, those on 
view to the public showed the children successfully using 
various media in self-expression, and proved to us the 
importance of art in our daily life as a means of comuni- 
cation and as a means of enriching ourselves and our 
community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Art Supervisor 

Testing and Remediation 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Standardized tests, both those which measure mental 
development and those which measure academic achieve- 
ment, provide the means for the comparison of the growth 
of children in a particular group against the measuring 
stick of others throughout the nation. The true value of 
standardized tests is achieved only to the extent that the 
test results are carefully scrutinized for the purpose of 
discovering particular elements of success or failure. 

Dr. Sherman Tinkelman, in the pamphlet, Are Your 
Basic Skills Showing? in explaining certain character- 
istics of appraisal as guidance says : 

The chief value of testing will lie in its regularity. A 
one-shot testing program may help solve the immediate 
problem, but usually provides insufficient information for 
a program of continuous guidance and instruction. Ad- 
ministration, supervisory and teacher planning are likely 
to be most effective when based upon regular appraisal 
of the growth and development of the child. On the basis 
of such a program of testing, the elementary school will 
be in a better position to determine the effectiveness of 
its program of instruction. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 169 

Our testing program in Lincoln is not that of the 'one- 
shot' variety ; it continues with regularity. Well over 
fifty new students have been tested for mental develop- 
ment and academic achievement this year as an aid in 
placing each of them in his proper group. Consistent 
with our practice, only the most extreme cases were 
accelerated or retarded, for we hold that social develop- 
ment and physical maturity are equally important with 
intellectual development. Through an enriched program 
and varied experiences the capable child is challenged 
and frustration is minimized for the slow maturing boy 
or girl 

Because the results of several tests should be con- 
sidered, instead of judging a child on the result of a 
single test, the California Achievement Tests were sup- 
plemented, in the spring of 1952, with the Gates Read- 
ing Test for grades four through six, and the Coopera- 
tive English Test for grades seven and eight. The results 
generally were favorable as the following figures indi- 
cate. 







Average Speed 






of Comprehension 


Grade four 


Gates 


Grade 5.0 


Grade five 


it 


" 6.3 


Grade six 


« 


" 6.5 
Median Percentile 


Grade seven 


Coop. Eng. 


76 


Grade eight 


tt u 


66 



This year our plan is to progress one step further. 
Grades four through six will be given the Gates Reading 
Test while grades seven and eight will again have the 
Cooperative English Test. Further assessment will be 
made of mental development in the Third grade from 
results of the Kuhlman-Finch Intelligence Test. In the 
sixth grade we plan to administer the Otis Quick-Scoring 
Mental Ability Test. 

We have an understanding this year with the Guidance 
Departments of both Weston and Concord. They have 
agreed to accept the results of our own tests instead of 






170 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

asking their freshmen, from Lincoln, to take two different 
batteries of their own choosing. This will facilitate the 
transition to high school and be less confusing to the 
students. 

The whole school testing program will remain as finally 
established this year. Thus, by the time the student has 
finished the eighth grade, there will be the results of 
four mental development tests by which to judge him, 
including the Binet in kindergarten, and a complete bat- 
tery of achievement test results from year to year which 
will show his progressive achievement. 

The following report was submitted to the School Com- 
mittee in June, 1952, together with other pertinent data. 

Facts to Be Noted 

1. The school average has remained the same for all 
three years of the testing program — at the 66th 
percentile — or sixteen points above the national 
average. 

2. The low averages have shifted from arithmetic 
fundamentals to English and Grammar. The 
change in the latter may be accounted for by the 
fact that Spelling is now rated separately. The 
graph shows Spelling to be quite high, except for 
the sixth grade. 

3. The medians run higher than the averages shown 
on the graphs where the very low scores of a few 
pulled them down. In no case was any median 
below the 50 percentile except mathematics in the 
sixth grade and English in the first. As little or 
no formal English is taught in the first grades in 
Lincoln, this is no great cause for alarm. 

4. There is cause for concern, however, in the steady 
decline of the sixth grade (seventh in 1952-1953). 
The cumulative records give two clues as to the 
cause of the poor attainment in this group. 

a. The group was unusually large (over forty) in 
grades one through three ; and there were two 



171 



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174 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

different teachers in both grades four and five 
(a half year each), 
b. There are eleven children who are from five 
months to a year under age for the grade. 

For these reasons the seventh grade will require our 
special attention during the coming year. 

5. The charted graphs for 1951 and 1952 show that 
grade one of 1951 has gone up from the 67th per- 
centile to nearly the 76th percentile in grade two 
for 1952. The median for this same group in 1952 
was at the 80th percentile, again showing how 
the very low scores of a few can pull down a class 
average. Our special groupings this year no doubt 
played a great part in this improvement. 

The remedial or development reading groups (1951- 
1952) were comprised of seventeen pupils in grades five 
through eight The last half year five first graders were 
added to the list as we were able to return five of the 
older pupils to their regular classes Testing in January 
showed that this move was warranted. Subsequent test- 
ing in May showed that the attainments of these five 
older students were not only sustained, but improved 
upon with one exception 

When the results of the May tests were tabulated the 
following facts were disclosed. 

1. The average gain in reading for the group of sev- 
enteen was 1.9 years. The highest single gain was 
4.2 years and the lowest was for one individual 
who appeared to have made no gain. 

2. The average gain in spelling was 1.6 years. The 
highest single gain here was 4 years (the same 
individual who appeared to make no gain in read- 
ing) . Only one pupil made less than a year's 

gain in reading. 

In September of 1952 new groups were formed which 
included seven third graders (who improved so rapidly 
that they were returned to their regular classes, after 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 175 

four months, where they are doing good work as reported 
by their teachers), six fifth graders, and five sixth 
graders. 

A new group of fourth graders, in need of assistance, 
will be formed immediately upon their arrival in the 
new building. They had been receiving help from the 
primary teachers on Wednesdays until the first grades 
returned to a regular five-day week. 

The seventh grade students are receiving the extra 
help they need for the development of skills in reading. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Supervisor of Testing and Remediation 



Music 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

The following report covers the music program for 
grades 1 through 8 from September 8, 1952 to December 
31, 1952. 

Music is no longer considered a "frill" in the school 
of today but a vital part of the educational system. Since 
education is living as well as preparation for life, the 
mujsic we study in school today is the music we will be 
singing when school days are over and we are adult mem- 
bers of the community, participating in the community 
chorus and church choir. Or, having grown to love music 
through pleasant associations in school, the individual 
will be a more appreciative and ardent listener through- 
out life. 

The program in the primary and elementary grades 
can be broken down into five divisions, which, of course, 
are graduated according to level. These are: singing, 
listening, dancing, creating and reading. At all levels, 



*7G EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

emphasis is placed on the singing of good folk songs, 
appropriate to the age group, or suitable for all ages. 
Listening is developed through hearing each other's sing- 
ing, instrumental music, phonograph records, becoming 
familiar with the great composers and attending con- 
certs. Folk dancing has been carried on in Grades I 
through III and folk and square dancing for Grades IV 
through VIII. Tonettes introduced in Grade III have 
proven an aid in learning to read music. Part singing 
has been started at the fourth grade level. 

An attempt is made to stimulate the children's interest 
wherever possible. Using a wide variety of books from 
which to draw their songs offers them a more interesting 
collection of music. Accompanying their singing when 
possible by the auto-harp or by instrumentalists from 
their own classes has given them a satisfying experience. 
Using such percussion instruments as the claves, maracas 
and dance drum encourages them to digest more readily 
the rhythmic aspects of music theory. Including several 
different activities and attempting to initiate new ac- 
tivities into each lesson has enriched the musical ex- 
perience. 

The instrumental program has been expanded. Six 
teachers are giving private and group lessons to the 
school children four afternoons each week, and in addi- 
tion, one day is devoted to piano lessons for children in 
the Center School. Instruments being studied are : piano, 
violin, guitar, auto-harp, recorder, clarinet, flute, trumpet 
and trombone. Children in Grades II and VIII are par- 
ticipating in the program, which now includes 70 stu- 
dents. A beginner's band of 25 has been organized. The 
instrumentation is fairly well balanced. This group in- 
cludes children in Grade III through VIII and meets at 
8 : 30 A.M. for an hour once a week. 

The United Nations, Thanksgiving and Christmas pro- 
grams have given others a chance to enjoy our work. 
The cooperation of the school staff and parents has been 
most gratifying. We are looking forward to our Gilbert 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 177 

and Sullivan opertta, folk festival, instrumental concert 
and piano recital in the Spring. 

It is strongly recommended that a music series be 
adopted, with the hope that this will enable the children 
to learn to become better music readers through a plan 
which is graduated to their particular age level. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Supervisor of Music 



Physical Education and Sports 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

A well-rounded program of physical education activities 
was provided for the pupils of the Lincoln Public Schools. 
The program was based upon recognition of individual 
differences, was wide in range, and was adapted to meet 
the needs and interests of the students. The activities 
engaged in were based upon seasonal sports with equal 
use of facilities for boys and girls. Tennis, football, 
soccer, basketball, kickball, tumbling, Softball, baseball, 
newcombe, badminton, and volleyball were a few of the 
sports enjoyed by all. Each child has a chance to lead 
according to his merits, and follow according to his will- 
ingness. It can honestly be stated that no child had 
"spectatoritis." 

Grades 1-3 have one 35-minute period a week with 
the physical education instructor plus daily play periods 
with their homeroom teachers. Large muscle-building 
activities, creative activities fundamentals of catching, 
throwing, and tumbling are taught. Through these ac- 
tivities self-confidence, poise, coordination, and the enjoy- 
ment of physical exercise are acquired. 

Grades 4 - 6 have two 45-minute periods a week with 
the physical education instructor plus play periods with 
their homeroom teachers. They have games of low or- 



178 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

ganization such as newcomb, kickball, dodgeball, and 
other games. Individual games such as ping-pong, bowl- 
ing, checkers, and chess are provided for the children's 
enjoyment. Self -testing activities, tumbling, and rhyth- 
mic activities are provided. Our aim is to develop the 
large muscles, to improve coordination and agility, and 
to teach basic skills in some of the sports. 

Grades 7 and 8 have two 45-minute periods a week. 
They have games of higher organization such as baseball, 
football, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, and the 
like. 

Rhythmic activities, which include square-folk dancing 
and social dancing are also stressed. Tumbling is car- 
ried on in a more advanced degree as well as individual 
sports. We seek to develop sportsmanship, team work, 
leadership, cooperation, and the enjoyment of play in 
all our activities. 

After school sports are conducted on an intramural 
basis. Here children have a chance to practice skills 
learned in their physical education classes. Our intra- 
murals consisted of football, soccer, kickball, newcombe, 
and volleyball games. The teams were chosen according 
to classes. 

In inter-scholastic sports Lincoln was fortunate to win 
the National League Pennant but lost the world series 
to Concord. Basketball was played by both girls and 
boys and they did very well, considering the lack of 
facilities. 

Recommendations : 

1. A full time Physical Education instructor for 
girls. 

2. Smaller classes. 

3. Field hockey for girls. 

4. Building of a sports library. 

5. Insurance for all 

Respectfully submitted, 

Director of Physical Ed it ca t io n 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE m 



Report of the Kindergarten 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

The Town of Lincoln has had a kindergarten now for 
nearly a decade. During this time, kindergarten enroll- 
ment has fluctuated from a beginning of twenty-five 
pupils to a current enrollment of seventy-two. It has 
obviously become necessary to have more than one group 
of children and more than one teacher. Group divisions 
were effected several years ago. Further division was 
necessary last year at which time an additional teacher 
was appointed. 

I am familiar with the objectives of the Lincoln kin- 
dergarten in past years, but it appears safe to assume 
that they did not differ greatly from our current ones 
which are helping the child to 

1. Think and act for himself 

2. Feel at ease with the group 

3. Work and play with other children 

4. Be able to handle mediums for expression 

5. Be ready for first grade experiences. 

These are carried out through the activities of the daily 
program which, though varied and flexible, generally 
follows this pattern : 

1. Conversation period 

2. Constructive work 

3. Story time 

4. Snack and rest 

5. Music 

6. Outdoor play. 

In conversation period the children learn how to take 
turns talking in group discussions — being patient and 
thinking of each other are important outcomes. At this 
time pertinent subject material is brought up by the 
children which leads to a wealth of experiences, of which 
the following may be mentioned : the seasons of the year. 



180 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

airplanes, trains, buses, and buildings. The topic of the 
day is generally carried through to the constructive work 
time, during which children learn how to handle clay, 
tools and materials required in easel painting, finger 
painting, and to work at the carpenter's bench. These 
help in developing small muscles so necessary for later 
work. 

Story time is important as the children become ac- 
quainted with many characters and situations as well as 
enrich their vocabulary. Music, stories, and art media 
are all closely correlated with the science or social studies 
being discussed. Simple excursions, such as walks in the 
surrounding woods, and frequent trips to the beginning 
construction of the new school addition, gave the children 
chances for first-hand observations. Throughout the ac- 
tivities, the children are helped to develop respect for 
others' ideas, rights, and privileges, cooperativeness, shar- 
ing in all phases of work and play, self-discipline, think- 
ing for themselves, listening to and following directions. 

The whole program is a readiness program — readiness 
for the more formalized program involved in adhering 
to more definite schedules and following mass patterns 
of behavior and working by oneself with others in the 
room participating in various activities, versus the readi- 
ness program of grade I which is more synonymous with 
reading. Even in the latter instance, we provide an in- 
troduction to reading readiness toward the end of the 
year as dictated by the needs and abilities of the children 
at that time. Social and emotional development are closely 
watched and every effort is made during the kindergarten 
year to prepare the children for the formal education of 
the years ahead and the parents for their return to the 
primary school. 

Prior to his entrance and during the kindergarten year 
every child is given a psychological test and a physical 
examination. These, along with the information blanks 
that every parent fills out before school entrance and 
other pertinent material, constitute the beginning of a 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 181 

file folder which follows the child through his elementary 
school years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Teachers of Kindergarten 



School Nursing and Health 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

I hereby submit my annual report of school nursing 
for the period ending December 31, 1952. 

Schools have been visited daily. Weighing and measur- 
ing was done twice, and scalps were examined frequently. 
I assisted Dr. Randolph Piper with physical examinations 
in kindergarten (a.m. group) and grades V. Due to the 
pressure of work, Dr. Piper was unable to continue physi- 
cals, although I was expecting and waiting for him on 
several occasions. Arrangements were made for the en- 
tire faculty to go to Middlesex Sanitorium for chest 
x-rays. 

Our kindergarten children and those new to first grade 
attended our Well Child Conference, where they were 
examined by Dr. John A. V. Davies, and received triple 
innoculations and vaccination as necessary. 

There have been 233 office calls for treatment or advice ; 
67 pupils were taken home; and 209 home visits were 
made to check on causes for absence. 

There was no severe injury or accident during this 
year. 

The schools closed two days in March because 143 
pupils were absent due to many cases of measles, virus 
infection, grippe, and severe colds. 

During May I had the Massachusetts Vision Chart, 
also the Maico Audiometer from the State Department 
of Health : since we could have these for one week only, 



182 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

not all pupils were examined. Taken first were those re- 
ferred by a teacher. 

Examined 287 

Defects (eyes) „ 4 

Defects corrected 2 

Defects (ears) 1 

Defects under treatment 1 

Among our pupils there have been : 

Measles „ 291 

Chicken pox „ 29 

Whooping cough 4 

Mumps „ « - ~ 2 

The dental clinic held two meetings a week. We lost 
Dr. Harold Ehrlich to the Navy, but were fortunate in 
having Dr. David Farrell come to us in June. He is 
carrying on with the very fine work our dental clinic has 
established. 

At present our pupils are enjoying good health. Thanks 
to a good group of teachers and a fine superintendent to 
work with, the year's activities have been a pleasure. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION N. OBER, R.N. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



183 



SCHOOL CENSUS 



Distribution of Minors 






by Age and Sex 


5 yrs. or over 


7 yrs. and 


October 1, 1952 


and under 7 


under 16 


1. Boys „.-. 


..... 71 


215 


2. Girls ..... 


62 


199 









Totals 

Distribution : Location 

1. In public Day School... 

2. Other 

3. In private schools... 

4. Not enrolled in schools 

5. Special — Elementary 



133 

119 

13 

1 



133 



414 

362 

50 

1 
1 

414 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLEES 
October I, 1952 

1. Arthur A. Hansen Trade School — 1 



TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Outside of Lincoln 

October I, 1952 

School y 10 U 12 Totals 

Concord - 11 19 17 11 58 

Weston - 9 10 4 7 30 

Other 1110 3 

21 30 22 18 91 



SCHOOL STATISTICS 

Membership by Rooms and Grade 
December 31, 1952 

Grade Teachei Room Boys Girls Totals 

Kdg. 

A.M. Mrs. Warren 10 II 21 

P.M. Mrs. Warren 8 10 18 

A.M. Miss Owen 9 7 16 

P.M. Miss Owen 9 7 16 



71 



184 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

I Miss Johnson . 16 12 28 

Mrs. Booth . 17 14 31 59 

II Miss Wilson .... 15 12 27 

Miss Gavel . 13 11 24 51 

III Mrs. Heaton - .... 10 7 17 

Miss Antonangeli 10 11 21 

Mr. Sapienza . 11 7 18 56 

IV Mr. Johnson . 14 15 29 

Miss Fenno ... 11 15 26 55 

V Mrs. Flagg 12 12 24 

Miss Morey 11 12 23 47 

VI Mr. Czarnowski 11 11 22 ' 

Mr. Pappas : . 14 8 22 44 

VII Mr. McVinney 9 13 22 

Mrs. Paranya 10 9 19 41 

VIII Mr. Berger 16 16 32 32 

20 TOTALS 236 220 456 

TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Outside of Lincoln 
October I, 1952 

School 9 10 11 12 Totals 

Concord ~ 11 19 17 11 58 

Weston •• 9 10 4 7 30 

Other 11 1 3 

21 30 22 18 91 



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EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



9. 
10. 



PER PUPIL COSTS— 1952 

Population of Town .. 

Average School Membership 

Equalized Valuation, per Pupil 

Expenditures for Schools „ 

Receipts Accredited to School 

Net Expenditures from Local Taxation 

Expenditures per Pupil 

Per Pupil Net Expenditures from Local 

Taxation 

Receipts per Pupil 



Transportation : Elementary High School 

Number of Pupils 372 89 

Mileage 25,866 21,164 

Expenditures $10,111.05 $8,272.67 

Expenditure per 

Pupil $27.18 $92.^5 

Based on estimated receipts. 



2,427 

503 

$10,184.00 

148,471.77 

33,214.17* 
115,257.60* 
295.41 

229.32* 
66.08* 

Total 

461 

47,030 

$18,383.72 



$39.88 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET 
FOR 1953 

Budget Items Expenditure Expenditure Recommended 

I. General Control: 1951 1952 1953 

Salaries $9,158.08 $11,340.87 $12,629.00 

Expenses . 675.96 313.61 367.00 

II. Instruction : 

Salaries 55,488.20 68,316.50 84,705.00 

Textbooks - 2,300.96 2,374.44 4,609.00 

Supplementary Books 

and Materials 3,846.33 3,448.85 4,303.00 

III. Operation: 

Salaries 4,523.14 4,828.32 7,750.00 

Fuel - 3,429.91 4,427.50 7,585.00 

Supplies r 1,459.82 939.47 1,490.00 

Utilities 2,184.05 2,579.67 5,501.00 

IV. Maintenance : 

Repairs and Upkeep... 2,129.03 1,411.87 3,767.00 

New Equipment 2,706.51 2,013.50 1,346.00 

V. Auxiliary Agencies : 

Health 746.03 567.27 885.00 

Transportation 12,824.73 18,383.72 28,369.00 

Tuition -.....' 25,496.10 27,013.67 31,675.00 

Miscellaneous 352.17 293.01 407.00 

VI. Vocational - - 169.02 219.50 290.00 

Totals - $127,490.00 $148,471.77 $195,678.00 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



187 



GRADUATED IN JUNE, 1952 



Grade VIII 



Judith Anderson 
Christopher Billings 
Barbara Ann Campobasso 
John Chales Campobasso, Jr. 
Matilda Cole 
Timothy Cole 
Andra Olmsted Cowles 
David Marbury Donaldson 
Allen Raymond Dougherty 
Geraldine Frences England 
Virginia Anne Farnum 
Sandra Forbes 
George Michael Gordon 
Adam John Gradeski 

Kathryn 



Carole Elaine Hart 
Ellen Edith Harvey 

Diana Healey 

Katrina Allen Jenney 

Joanne Chapman Kane 

Claudette LeBlanc 

Murray Mills 

Daniel Seymour Parish 
* Sarah Wood Preston 

Ann Carleen Ritchie 

Francis Joseph Smith, Jr. 

Katherine Henriette Van Leer 

Annette Weld 

Kate Wells 
How Wilson 



Concord High School 



Marjorie Bean 
Richard Brooks 
Robert Curtis Chapin 
Frank Domenichella 
Janet Henley 



Christina Kleindienst 
Sarah MacLea 
Ronald Mclvor 
Arthur Mills 
Dana Murphy 



Hans Van Leer 



Weston High School 



John Olmsted Cowles 
Philip Playfair Kimball 
James Carter Kubik 



Eleanor C. Nelson 
Robert Livingston Loud 
Frederick Baylies Taylor, Jr. 



John Pennock Wiley 



Honors 



Thomas Tuttle, Class of 1953 
Marjorie Bean 

Richard Brooks 

Dana Murphy 

John Olmsted Cowles 

Frederick Baylies Taylor, Jr. 

John Pennock Wiley 

Llewellyn Bigelow, Class of '53 



Harvard Prize Book 
Scholarship — 

Peirce Secretarial School 
Lincoln Scholarship 
Lincoln Scholarship 
2nd Class Honors 
2nd Series Essay Prize 
3rd Series Essay Prize 
Harvard Book Prize 



* deCordova Award. 



188 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



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189 



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190 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



STAFF ROSTER — JANUARY L 1953 



Name 

Andrew J. Manges- 
Robert B. Patcfr 
Louis J. Sapienza 

Phyllis Johnson 
Augusta F. Sisk 

Ann G. Paranya 
Irma Antonangeli 

Edward J. Czarnowski 

Joseph P. McVinney 
Hazel Flagg 
Miriam Zartarian 
Harvey R. Berger 
Dorothy E. Booth 
Sylvia Gavel 
Robert J. Johnson 
Joan B. Warren 

Madeleine C. Wilson 
Elizabeth Feno 
Naney Heaton 
Prudence Morey 
Jane Owen 
Spero Pappas 

Jean C. Scott 



Position 



Superintendent 
of Schools 



Principal- 
New School 

Principal — 
Center School' 

Grade One 

Remedial 
and Guidance 



Training 

Butler University 
Harvard Grad. Sch. of Ed. 
A.B,, M.S. Ed. 

State Teachers' College, 
Fitchburg, B.S. Ed. 

Boston University, B.S. Ed„ 



Appointed! 
L948 



1950 



Lesley College, B.S. Ed. 
Boston University, B.S. Ed, 



Language Arts S.T.C.- Montelair, N.J., A.B 
Grade Three 



194b 
1946 

1949 



Physical 
Education 

Manual Arts 

Grade Five 

Art 

Social Studies 

Grade One 

Grade Two 

Grade Four 

Kindergarten 

Grade Two 
Grade Four 
Grade Three 
Grade Five 
Kindergarten 
Science 

Music 



Fitchburg State Teachers College. 1950> 
B.S. Ed. 

Boston University, B.S. Ed., Ed. M. 1950 



Boston University, B.S. Ed. 1950 

Sargent 195V 

Tufts College, B.S. Ed. 1951 

Tufts College, A.B., Ed. M. . 1951 

Indiana University, B.S. Ed. 1951 

Tufts College, B.S. Ed. 1951 

Boston University, A.A., B.S. Ed. 1951 

Boston University, B.S. Ed., 1951 
Ed. M. 

Welfesley College, A.B. 195L 

Wheaton College. B.A. 1952. 

Arizona State Teachers, A.B, 1952 

Duke University, A.B. 1952. 

Wheaton College, A.B. 1952. 

State Teachers' College, 1952 
North Adams, B.S. Ed. 

Fort Hays Kansas State College,. 1952: 

B.S. Ed. 



\QoarraYih for ig$$ 



NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln 
in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of 
said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting 
for the Transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town 
House in said Lincoln, on Monday the second day of 
March next at 7:30 o'clock P.M. then and there to act 
on the following articles except Article 1 and also to meet 
in said Town House on Saturday, the seventh day of 
March next, at 12 o'clock Noon, then and there to act 
on the following Article 1, by posting a copy of this 
Warrant, by you attested in each of the Post Offices, 
and in some other public place in said Town seven days 
at least before the second day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, 
March seventh will be open at 12 o'clock Noon, and may 
be closed at 7 o'clock P.M. 



192 WARRANT FOR 1953 

Article 1. To bring in their votes for the following- 
Town Officers and any other officers required by law, to 
be elected by Australian Ballot viz: 
One Town Clerk for one year. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen for three years. 
One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 
One Treasurer for one year. 
One Collector of Taxes for three years. 
One Auditor for one year. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 
One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for 

three years. 
One member of the Board of Health for three years. 
One Tree Warden for one year. 
One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for 

three years. 
One member of the Trustees of the Bemis Fund for 

Free Public Lectures for three years. 
One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 

for three years. 
One member of the Planning Board for five years. 
One Director for the deCordova and Dana Museum and 

Park for four years, 
and also the following question: 

Shall the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 402 of 
the Acts of 1952? (See page 25) 
This measure provides for restricting the use of lands 
abutting the Highway now known as Route 2 in the 
Towns of Lincoln and Concord. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers, required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committes, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



WARRANT FOR 1953 193 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any of 
its members and to fix additional compensation of such 
members. Selectmen 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town and enact 
anything- in relation to the same. 

Selectmen 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning- January 1, 
1953, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within 
one year and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws 8 

Selectmen 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct 
services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint 
a committee, raise and appropriate money, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

Article 8. To see if the Town will accept as a public 
way, the private road known as Huntley Lane, as shown 
on a plan recorded with South Middlesex District Reg- 
istry of Deeds, Plan book 7820 plan 4 and approved by 
the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln June 11, 1952. 

By Petition 

Article 9. To see if the Town will approve the instal- 
ation of an oil-burner in the present library furnace at 
a cost of approximately five hundred dollars to be paid 
from available trust funds, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

(See Report of Library Trustees). 
Library Trustees 



194 WARRANT FOR 1953 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $406.80 to pay the following un- 
paid 1952 bills : 

Cemetery Department $272.00 

Fire Department 35.89 

School Department 98.91 

Treasurer 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to continue 
the Committee for the 200th Anniversary of the Town 
and appropriate the sum of $2,500 for its use, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

(See Report of the Selectmen). 
Selectmen 

Article 12. To see if jthe Town will raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purchase of a sprayer and 
second hand truck for the use of the Tree Warden, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(See Report of the Tree Warden). 
Selectmen 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $300. for work on the Assessor's Maps, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Assessors 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $4,000. for the salary and expenses 
of an assistant, to be employed by the Selectmen, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

(See Report of Board of Selectmen) . 
Selectmen 

Article 15. To see if the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $1,750. to be used in settlement of the suit against 
the Town by Frederick Stickel, or to reimburse the Water 
Department for funds paid in settlement of said suit, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

(See Report of Board of Selectmen) . 
Selectmen 



WARRANT FOR 1953 195 

Article 16. To see if the Town will appropriate for the 
use of the School Building Committee, the sum of $2,000. 
or such other sum as will complete the addition to the 
New School or take any other action relative thereto. 
School Building Committee 

Article 17. To see if the Town will authorize the 
School Building Committee to take preliminary steps 
toward the acquisition of additional land and ways ad- 
jacent to the New School, appropriate the sum of $1,500. 
for expenses, or take any other action relative thereto. 
School Building Committee 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to^ raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a sand 
spreader for the use of the Highway Department or take 
any action relative thereto. 

(See Report of Superintendent of Streets). 
Selectmen 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law by striking out Sections 2 to 23 in- 
clusive, as amended, and substituting therefor the follow- 
ing Sections 2 to 16, inclusive: 

Section (2) Definitions: 

In this by-law the following terms shall have mean- 
ing's as described below: 

(a) Structure: An entire building-, including appurten- 
ances thereto, or any construction upon which hu- 
man effort has been expended and which extends 
more than eight feet in length or breadth and seven 
feet in height measuring to the extremities of all 
parts. 

(b) Dwelling: A structure, house, or building which is 
used or occupied in whole or part for residence. 

(c) Family: Any number of persons living together as 
a single economic unit. 

(d) One-Family Dwelling: A dwelling designed for one 
family. 

(e) Two-Family Dwelling: A dwelling designed for or 
occupied by two families. 

(f) Apartment House: A dwelling occupied by more 
than two families, or a structure occupied by one 
or more families above a first floor used for non- 
residential purposes. 



196 WARRANT FOR 1953 

(g) Rooming or Boarding House: A dwelling in which 
the family resident therein provides eating and/ or 
sleeping accommodations for not more than three 
paying guests. 

(h) Hotel or Lodging House: A structure or part there- 
of, or a group of structures on a single lot, where 
space is used for sleeping or feeding more than 
three persons as paying guests, regular or transient.. 

(i) Lot: The whole area of a single parcel of land un- 
der one ownership. Whenever such a parcel is di- 
vided on a plan which has, been recorded or filed at 
the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds the 
term "lot" as used in this by-law shall mean a lot 
as shown on such plan; or a lot shall mean a single 
parcel on the plot plan accompanying application 
for a building permit. 

{}) Street: A public way, a way opened or dedicated 
to public use or a way plotted and laid out for ulti- 
mate public use, whether or not constructed. 

(k) Street Line: The sideline of a street or way, as 
determined by deeds and plans recorded at the Reg- 
istry of Deeds; where no line is thus legally estab- 
lished, then a line parallel with and twenty feet 
distant from the center line of a travelled way. 

(1) Use: The act of using land or structures, or where 
the context permits, the erection, construction, re- 
pair, enlargement, or alteration of a structure in- 
tended for use. 

(m) Accessory User A use which in the Town of Lincoln 
is customarily incidental to the principal use to 
which it is accessory. 

(n) Non-Conforming Use: A legally existing use which 
does not conform to the zoning regulations for the 
district in which it is loeated. 

^o) Private Garage: Covered spaee for the housing of 
motor vehicles, no more than two of which belong- 
to others than the occupants of the lot on which 
such space is located. 

(p) Service Station: A structure or lot used for the 
sale of gasoline and oil or for servicing- or storing 
motor vehicles, other than a private garage. 

(q) Automobile Repair Shop: A shop or garage for the 
repair of motor vehicles, other than a private garage 
or service station. 

Section (3) Administration 

(a) The provisions of this by-law shall be administered 
and enforced by the Inspector of Buildings. 



WARRANT FOR 1953 197 

ib) No application of any kind shall be approved unless 
the plans, specifications and intended use set forth 
in said application conform in all respects with 
this by-law, or unless the applicant has secured a 
written permit from the Board of Appeals, pur- 
suant to Section 11 below. 

(c) Any application for a new or altered use of land 
or structure shall be accompanied by a specific 
reference to the subject lot as recorded in the Reg- 
istry of Deeds, or by two copies of a plan of the 
lot, drawn to scale, showing the entire recorded 
ownership, all existing structures, all abutting 
streets, and the exact area and boundaries of the 
parcel to be assigned to the subject use. A record 
of such application and plan shall be kept on file. 

Section (4) Zoning Districts 

(a) For the purpose of this by-law the Town of Lincoln 
is divided into 3 classes of districts, designated as 
follows: 

Single Residence Districts, General Residence Dis- 
tricts, Commercial Districts. 

(b) Said districts are established as shown, defined and 
bounded on the map accompanying this by-law, 
entitled Zoning Map of Lincoln, Mass., dated Feb- 
ruary 2, 1953, and filed" with the Town Clerk. Said 
map and all explanatory matter thereon are hereby 
made a part of this by-law. 

Section (5) Single Residence Districts 

In a single residence district no lot shall be used 
and no structure shall be erected, maintained, altered, or 
used for any purpose other than the following, including 
accessory uses: 

(a) One-family detached dwelling, provided that there 

shall be only one such dwelling per lot. 

(b) Rooming or boarding house. 

(c) Church, parish house, religious or denominational 
school not conducted for profit. 

(d) Publicly operated building, school, park or area 
dedicated to municipal use or service. 

(e) Farm, greenhouse, nursery, truck garden; stand for 
sale of farm produce by a resident of Lincoln, pro- 
vided that a major proportion of all products sold 
shall have been raised within the Town and provided 
further that space for customers' cars is available 
off the right-of-way of the street. 



198 WARRANT FOR 1953 

(f ) Office or studio operated or maintained by a person 
resident in the structure, or a customary home oc- 
cupation conducted in a dwelling structure or ac- 
cessory building- by a resident, provided that not 
more than one person not resident in the structure 
is employed therein* In such cases one sign of not 
more than two square feet in area may be dis- 
played. 

(g) Accessory uses, including private garage, private 
stable, or farm buildings used as part of the opera- 
tion of a farm. 

(h) Subject to permission of the Board of Appeals, as 
provided in Section 11 below, the following: 
private school, cemetery, hospital, sanitarium, nurs- 
ing home, or charitable institution; use of land or 
structure by a public utility; community club not 
conducted for profit; conversion of a one-family 
dwelling existing at the time this by-law was orig- 
inally adopted into a two-family dwelling, pro- 
vided that the exterior appearance be not signifi- 
cantly altered, and provided further that the lot 
appurtenant to said dwelling have an area of at least 
60,000 square feet. 

(i) Subject to permission of the Board of Appeals, as 
provided in Section 11 below, a sand or gravel pit 
or the removal of soil, loam, sand or gravel from a 
property not in public use. In granting a permit 
therefor the Board shall specify such limitations, 
and safeguards as it may deem appropriate. This 
provision shall not limit the removal of excess ma- 
terial from a property when such removal is inci- 
dental to the construction of an approved structure 
or street. 

Section (6) General Residence Districts 

Uses permitted in a general residence district shall be 
the following, and no others: 

(a) Any use permitted in a single residence district sub- 
ject to the same restrictions as are prescribed therein. 

(b) Two-family dwelling, provided that there shall be 
only one detached dwelling per lot. 

Section (7) Commercial Districts 

Uses permitted in a commercial district shall be the 

following, and no others: 

(a) Any use permitted in a general residence district, 
including as a right those uses listed in Section 5h, 
and including subject to permission of the Board of 
Appeals those uses listed in Section 5i. 



WARRANT FOR 1953 199 

(b) Apartment House, Hotel or Lodging- House. 

(c) Retail store or service establishment. 

(d) Business or professional office; bank. 

(e) Restaurant or other place for serving food. 

(f) Place of business of caterer, confectioner, decora- 
tor, dressmaker, optician, mortician, craftsman, or 
member of a building trade, and similar uses. 

(g) Service station, provided that repairs shall be linf- 
ited to minor changes and adjustments, and pro- 
vided that gasoline pumps and equipment shall be 
so located that vehicles can not be serviced unless 
they are entirely on the service station lot. 

(h) Automobile salesroom, provided that no display of 
vehicles for sale shall be permitted closer to the 
street line than the major structure on the same 
lot. 
(i) Sign or display advertising goods or services avail- 
able on the lot, provided that no sign or display 
shall project beyond the street line, shall be illumi- 
nated other than by indirect white light, or shall 
have a gross area of more than 30 square feet, 
(j) Subject to permission of the Board of Appeals, as- 
provided in Section 11 below, the following: 

Theatre, moving-picture house, bowling alley, 
skating rink or similar commercial amusement 
place, but not including outdoor moving picture 
or dancing establishments; 

Lumber, fuel, feed, or ice establishment, yard 
for the keeping of materials or equipment by 
contractor, landscape constructor, or landscape 
gardener; automobile repair shop. 
Light manufacturing and similar activities, pro- 
vided that such proposed activities will not be 
offensive, injurious or noxious because of noise, 
vibration, smoke, fumes, dust, odors, danger of 
fire or explosion, or other characteristics detri- 
mental to a dominantly residential town. 
Any permit granted under this subsection (j) shall 
be subject to the provision that no storage of ma- 
terials appurtenant thereto shall be permitted be- 
tween the street line and the front line of struc- 
tures on the subject lot, or if there be no structure, 
within 40 feet of the street line. 

Section (8) Height Regulations 

(a) The maximum height of any structure in a single 
residence district shall be 35 feet or three stories. 



200 WARRANT FOR 1953 



(b) The maximum height of any structure in a general 
residence or commercial district shall be 30 feet 
or two and one-half stories. 

(c) In determining the height of structures any floor- 
level shall be counted as a story if it is to be used 
in part for sleeping rooms, or if it is higher than 
three feet below the average ground level around 
the exterior walls of the structure. A half-story is 
that portion of a structure under a sloping roof, the 
cubic contents of which are never more than half 
of those of the story below; if the cubic contents 
are greater than half, it shall be deemed a story. 
Limitations of height shall not apply to chimneys,, 
ventilators, skylights, towers, spires, tanks, silos and 
other features usually carried above roofs, if such 

features are in no way used for living purposes. 

Section (9) Area and Yard Regulations 

fa) Except as hereinafter specified, there shall be pro- 
vided for each dwelling or other main structure or 
use a lot with a minimum area as follows: 

Area 
In single residence districts 40,000 sq. ft- 

In general residence districts 12,000 sq. ft. 

For dwellings in commercial 

districts 12,000 sq. ft. 

Under no conditions shall there be less than 6,000 
square feet of lot area for each family to be housed 
on said lot. 

(b) Except as hereinafter specified, there shall be pro- 
vided for each dwelling in any district and for each 
main non-residential structure in a residential dis- 
trict a lot having at least 80 feet of frontage on a 
street, at least 80 feet in any direction from side lot 
line to side lot line between said street and such 
structure and the shortest distance taken through 
such structure, from side lot line to side lot line, 
shall be at least 160 feet. 

(c) The provisions of paragraphs "a" and "b" shall 
not prevent the use of lots, legally established at 
the time these provisions were first adopted, which 
are non-conforming as to width or area, but no 
such lot shall be changed as to size or shape so as 
to decrease its width or area. 

(d) No more than 25 percent of the area of any lot 
may be covered by structures, 



WARRANT FOR 1953 201 

(e) No structure or part thereof in any district shall be 
so located as to extend within 40 feet of a street 
line, except that this shall not apply to uncovered 
steps. 

(f) No structure or part thereof in a residential dis- 
trict, and no dwelling' or part thereof in a commer- 
cial district, shall extend within 30 feet of a side or 
rear lot line. This restriction shall not apply to ac- 
cessory building in residence districts, provided that 
the distance from any part of such structures to the 
lot line shall exceed its height above the ground 
level. 

(g) No accessory or main buildings shall at any points 
be less than 10 feet apart unless they conform to 
building code regulations relative to fire safety. 

Section (10) Non-Conforming Uses 

(a) Nothing in this by-law shall prevent the continua- 
tion of a non-forming use of lot or structure. 

(b) No increase in the extent of the non-conforming use 
of a structure or lot may be made. 

(c) Wherever a non-conforming use has been changed 
to a more restricted use, it shall not again be 
changed to a less restricted use. 

(d) Wherever a non-conforming use has been aban- 
doned for a period of more than one year it shall 
not be re-established and any future use shall con- 
form to this by-law. 

(e) Wherever a structure, or part thereof, put to a non- 
conforming use is destroyed or damaged, it may be 
reconstructed substantially as it existed prior to 
such destruction or damage and may continue to 
be used for the same or a more restricted use; 
provided that reconstruction is in fact commenced 
within a year following the date of such destruction 
or damage, and the reconstruction is completed and 
the structure occupied within a reasonable time 
thereafter. 

Section (11) Board of Appeals 

(a) A Board of Appeals is hereby established in ac- 
cordance with Section 30 of Chapter 40 of the Gen- 
eral Laws, as amended. Said Board shall consist 
of five members each appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen for a term of five years provided that 
only one term shall expire each year; there shall 
be two Associate Members, each appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen for a period of four years, one 
term to expire every second year, to serve on said 



202 WARRANT FOR 1953 

Board of Appeals in case of a vacancy, inability 
to act, or interest on the part of a member. 

(b) The Board of Appeals shall adopt such rules of 
procedure and exercise such powers and duties as 
are consistent with paragraphs 3 through 9 of Sec- 
tion 30 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as 
amended. Said rules of procedure shall include 
provisions for submission of petition in writing, 
for advertising and holding hearings, for keeping 
records of proceedings, for recording the vote of 
each member upon each question, for setting forth 
the reason or reasons for each decision, and for 
notifying the parties at interest, including the 

. Building Inspector and the Planning Board, as to 
each decision. The powers and duties of the Board 
of Appeals shall include the power to determine 
action in the cases set forth in paragraphs "c", "d" 
and "e" below. 

(c) The Board of Appeals shall hear and decide appeals 
taken by any person aggrieved by reason of his in- 
ability to obtain a permit from the Building In- 
spector acting as enforcement officer under this 
by-law. 

(d) The Board of Appeals shall hear and decide re- 
quests for special permits as provided in Sections 
5-h, 5-i, and 7-j of this by-law. 

(e) The Board of Appeals shall hear and decide re- 
quests for variance from the terms of this by-law 
where, owing to conditions especially affecting the 
lot or use in question, a literal enforcement of the 
provisions of the by-law would involve substantial 
hardship to the appellant, and where the desired 
relief may be granted without detriment to the 
public good and without substantially derogating 
from the intent or purpose of this by-law. 

(f) In carrying out the provisions of paragraphs (d) 
and (e) above, the Board may impose, as a con- 
dition of its decision, such restrictions as to manner 
and duration of use as will in its opinion safeguard 

- the legitimate use of the property in the neighbor- 
hood and the health and safety of the public, and 
conform to the intent and purpose of this by-law, 
such restrictions to be stated in writing by the 
Board and made a part of the permit. 

(g) No petition considered under paragraphs (d) or (e) 
above which has been unfavorably acted upon by 
the Board of Appeals shall be again considered on 
its merits by said Board within two years after the 



WARRANT FOR 1953 203 

date of such unfavorable action,, except with the 
written consent of all members of the Planning 
Board. 

Section (12) Amendments 

The Planning Board may, or upon written petition 
petition of ten citizens shall, initiate proceedings for the 
amendment of this by-law or map, pursuant to the pro- 
vision of Section 27 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
as amended. 

Section (13) Conflict of Laws 

Where this by-law imposes a greater restriction upon 
the use, height, and the area of structures or the use of 
premises than is imposed by other by-laws, the provisions 
of this by-law shall control. The invalidity of any sec- 
tion or provision of this by-law shall not invalidate any 
other section or provision thereof. 

Section (14) Penalty 

Whoever violates any provision of this by-law shall 
be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars for 
each offense. Each day or portion thereof that such viola- 
tion continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

Section (15) Effective Date 

This by-law shall take effect as provided by Section 
32 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 624 of the Acts of 1952, which provides for an 
increase in the annual amounts of certain pensions, re- 
tirement allowances, annuities and other benefits payable 
by the Commonwealth and its political subdivisions 
to certain former employees and persons claiming under 
them, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Treasurer 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before 
the time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our 
hands this 14th day of February in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and fifty-three. 

EDMUND W. GILES 
HENRY DeC. WARD 
JOHN O. WILSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln 



CfppenoLx 



Vital Statistics 

56 Births, 21 Marriages and 29 Deaths were recorded 
during the year 1952. 



Births 



Date 

of Birth Name of Child 

Jan 11 Erie Alan Williams 

Jan 12 Thomas James Geary 

Jan 13 Edith Elliott Chase 

Jan 15 Norberti Francis Roberti, Jr. 

Jan 22 David Stewart Tew 

Feb 2 Susan Miriam Lush 

Feb 4 Douglas Clyde Spence 

Feb 4 Earl Francis Daniels 

Feb 9 Richard Jackson Parker 

Feb 12 Dan Metro Fedock 

Feb 12 Kenneth Rudolph MacLeod, Jr. 

Feb 12 Benjamin Redway Pierce 

Feb 14 Edward James Denehy 

Feb 15 Thomas Andrew Falter, Jr. 

Feb 19 Delafield Coert DuBois 

Feb 19 Dorothy Blanchard Mead 

Feb 26 Richard Fay Withington, Jr. 

Mar 8 Patricia Marie Neville 

Mar 14 Bruce Rowlands Winohell 

Mar 16 David Drew Hal<- 

Mar 17 Joyce Louise Fillmore 

Mar L8 Cynthia Louise Schoales 

Mar il Elizabeth Heberton Donaldson 



Names of Parents 
Edwin L. and Helena R. Williams 
Edward T, and Katherine D. Geary 
Irving H. and Anne 0. Chase 
Noi-berti F. and Frances 0. Roberti 
John B. and Valerie H. Tew 
Morley J. and Mary K. Lu.sh 
Robert A. and Helen M. Spence 
Francis J. and Claire M. Daniels 
Jackson B. and Jacqueline A. Parker 
Metro and Hazel A. Fedock 
Kenneth R. and Margaret M. MacLeod 
Charles E. and Dora R. Pierce 
Edward J. and Bernadetta J. Denehy 
Thomas and Theresa H. Falter 
Rliot and Barbara R. DuBois 
Varnum R. and Janice H. Mead 
Richard F. and Katharine D. Withington 
James M. and Maijorie J. Neville 
Gilbert S. and Amy J. Winohell 
Ha/en C. Jr. and Gail R. Hale 
Bruce R. and Eleanor L. Fillmore 
Gilbert C. and Dorothy M. Schoales 
Cordon A. and Elizabeth H. Donaldson 



206 



APPENDIX 



Apr 2 Patricia Bernice Sweeney 

Apr 5 Thomas White Crawford 

Apr 8 Lindsay Sherman Burk 

Apr 19 Ellen Hutchison Lummus 

May 15 Faye Bulkley Gilfoy 

May 20 Deborah Lee Huntley 7 ~ 

May 23 Patricia Winefred l3ean~ 

May 27 Patricia Ellen Goodno 

Jun 2 Lisa Jane Lustwerk 

Jun 9 Thomas Bradbury Gross 

Jun 12 Walter Joseph Bonia. Jr. 

Jun 16 Cheryl Ann Bean 

Jun IS Deborah Ann Burke 

Jun 23 Carol Ann Bergen 

Jun 27 Linda Lou Messina 

Jul 16 Cynthia Denise Hyde 

Jul 19 Deborah Ruth Busfield 

Jul 31 Nathaniel William Niles, 2nd 

Aug 20 Bruce Edward Harte Johnson 

Aug 27 Deborah Kimberley Wood 

Aug 27 John Farrar Giles, 3rd 

Aug 28 Robert Howard Gormley 

Aug 31 Mark Joseph Hagenian 

Sep 5 Mark Basil Moynihan 

Sep 5 Mark Alan Arnold 

Sep 15 John Eric Gray 

Oct 11 David Marcy Kirkpatrick . 

Dec 1 Starr Daggett Lothrop 

Dec. 11 Linnea Mae Hanson 

Dec. 11 Ralph Stephen Flannery 

Dec. 17 Richard Lintz 

Dec. 19 Patricia Ellen Cook 

Dec 30 Polly Brown 



Joseph E. and Jeanne M. Sweeney 
John D. and Joanna Crawford 
George W. and Ruth M. Burk 
John W. and Ann A. Lummus 
Donald A. and Helen B. Gilfoy 
Oland F. and Alberta T. Huntley 
William M. and Lorraine C. Dean 
Ralph H. and Pauline E. Goodno 
Ferdinand and Ingeborg Lustwerk 
Thomas A. O. and Judith C. Gross 
Walter J. and Germaine O. Bonia 
Malcolm C. and Theresa M. Bean 
James F. Jr. and Catherine C. Burke 
Kenneth W. and Emily K. Bergen 
Charles C. and Lucy I. Messina 
Benjamin D. and Mildred B. Hyde- 
Gibson L. and Marilyn R. Busfield 
Robert L. and Virginia M. Niles 
Ernest and Grace M. Johnson 
Roy W. and Clan-e M. Wood 
John F. and Mary C. Giles 
Robert F. and Gloria V. Gormley 
Joseph C. and Irene R. Hagenian 
Paul V. and Rita Moynihan 
S. Leonard and Anna M. Arnold 
Robert W. and Dorothy G. Gray 
David W, and Margaret Kirkpatrick 
John W. and Ellen D. Lothrop 
Everett O. and Doris A. Hanson 
Ralph and Constance H. Flannery 
Worth B. and Annette Lintz 
Harry and Kathleen G. Cook 
David R. and Sarah J. Brown 



Marriages 



Date of 

Marriage Names 

Feb 6 Jacob Robert Leed 

Mary Marguerite Snider 

Feb 22 Lincoln Dodd Richardson 

Katherine Landsdowne Wood 

Feb 21 Malcolm Rodman Stone 
Judith artha Koch 

Apr 19 Richard Brakeley Hutchins 
Suzanne Fradd 



Residence 
Pennsylvania 
Lincoln 

Lincoln 
Wellesley 

Lincoln 
Concord 

Worcester 
Lincoln 



VITAL STATISTICS 



207 



Jun 7 Robert Henry Hux 

Rhoda McAllister Henry 

Jun 8 Rodney Pierce Cowen 
Eleinor Jane Henley 

Jun 14 Leo Joseph Algeo 

Elaine Therese Costello 

Jun 20 Paul William Maraisi 
Mary Sawyer Kubik 

Jun 21 Worcester Meriam 

Edith Margaret LeBuff 

Jun 28 Leigh Hale Gibbs 

Marian Lockwood Day 

Jul 4 Ralph Flannery 

Constance Helen Moszka 

Jul 4 Gordon H. Greenlaw 
Virginia J. Russes 

Jul 5 Joseph Shipley Newell Jr 
D. Catherine Hardman 

Sep 14 Stephen Hopkins David 
Carolyn Wheelock 

Sep 20 Wallace Dunbar Dexter 3rd 
Gwendolyn Stearns Gale 



Virginia 
Virginia 

Falmouth 
Lincoln 

Lincoln 
Lincoln 

Pennsylvania 
Lincoln 

Lincoln 
Brighton 

Lincoln 
Brighton 

Concord 
Lincoln 

"Walthant 
Lincoln 

Lincoln 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Lincoln 
Auburndale 

Milton 
Lincoln 



Nov 8 Alfred M. Bartlett Jr. 
Faith F. Sousa 



Lincoln 
Waltham 



Nov 8 Walter A. Kinsler 
Barbara E. Croney 



Lincoln 
Cambridge 



Nov 15 William Richardson Ericson 
Marilyn Louise Dresser 

Nov 20 Thomas Nickerson Rogers 
Jane Anthony Richardson 



Quincy 
Lincoln 

Boston 
Lincoln 



Nov 29 Joseph Francis Manning 
Josephine Mary Russo 



Lincoln 

Belmont 



Dec 12 Chester Joseph Legere 
Lillian Therese Gainer 



Maynard 

Lincoln 



208 



APPENDIX 



Death; 



Date of 

Death Name 
Jan 4 Aubrey W. Burgess 
Jan 10 Donald Robert Murphy- 
Jan 25 Anna Rosamond Snelling: 
Feb 15 Mary Alice Algeo 
Feb 22 Marjorie Lee Sharpe 

Mar 22 Caroline Louise Conary 
Apr 14 George Frederick Folger Osborne 
May 4 Robert F. Rasmusson 
May 5 Joseph S. Newell 
May 19 James Gill Stephens- 
May 18 Mary Ellen Bradley 
Jun 8 Campobasso 
Jul 9 Iva S. Mann 
Jul 13 Margaret Crowley 
Jul 21 Frank Herman Ehlert 
Jul 27 Edwin Brooks Rice 
Aug 9 Mary E. White 
Sep 2 Ann Crowley 
Sep 6 George Kolyshkin 
Sep 12 Charles A. Hews 
Sep 22 James N. Aveni 
Sep 30 James Wood 
Oct 2 Clara Wilhelmlna Behrens 
Oct 6 Mary C. Rooney 
Oct 7 Grace Dudley 
Oct 8 Caroline Snelling 
Oct 15 Elizabeth Papple. Witherton 
Nov 7 Jan Anthony Rudzki 
Dec 26 Frances Elizabeth Boyce 



Y. 


M. 


D. 


62 


11 


3 

6 hrs. 


45 


3 


8 


70 


10 


23 


34 


8 


8 


86 


10 


10 


79 


— 


— 


61 


^ — 


— 


54 


8 


25 


89 


5 


1 


60 


1 


14 
11 hrs. 


S3 


10 


19 


75 


— 


- 


79 


10 


14 


87 


3 


11 


86 


— 


— 


79 


S 


28 


84 


11 


12 


75 


— 


— 


33 


— 


— 


66 


11 


10 


90 


7 


9 


77 


4 


10 


79 


8 s 


3 


84 


11 


28 


75 


7 


14 



74 



10 



18 



VALUATION LIST 



209 



Valuation List, January 1, 1952 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Abbott, John A. and Diana B 

Adams, John $100. 

Adams, John Q. and Lucy D 

Adams, John Quincy 510. 

Adams, Ramelle C 

Adams, Thomas B 200. 

Adkins, Archibald W. and 

Dorothea ~. 

A'Hearn, Marian E 

Albano Bros , 

Algeo, John T. and Catherine R. 

Algeo, Mary A 

Allen, Lloyd R 

Anderson, Lawrence B, and 

Rosina DuP 

Antinarelli, Joseph J. and 

Helen J 

Appleby, Richard B 

Appt. Harry S. and Etta E 

Arnold, S. Leonard and Anna M. 

Aruda, Manuel J 

Ashworth, Harold T. and Irma D. 

Avery, Abigail D 

Ayei\ Richard B. Jr., and 

Constance M 

Aylward, Claire M 

Baggs, Arthur E. Jr., and 

Marion S. 

Baker, Fred L 985 

Baker, Fred L. and Lulu G 

Baker, John C. and Elizabeth E. 

Baker, Margaret C 

Baker, Theodore C. and 

Mary Amory 

Bardsley, Doris A 

Barker, Elliot R 

Barnaby, John M. and 

Charlotte B 



$7,050 


$317.25 




4.50 


39,550 


1,779.75 




22.95 


10,500 


472.50 




9.00 


10,000 


450.00 


3,150 


141.75 


300 


13.50 


4,750 


213.75 


4,600 


207.00 


250 


11.25 



13,300 



598.50 



500 


22.50 


4,500 


202.50 


3,250 


146.25 


4,250 


191.25 


250 


11.25 


7,000 


315.00 


7.500 


337.50 


9.200 


4 14.00 


1.000 


45.00 


1.200 


54.00 




44.33 


4,580 


206.10 


2.000 


90.00 


5.000 


225.00 


9,250 


416.25 


2,600 


117.00 


1.500 


67.50 



4.600 



207.00 



210 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Barthel, Walter and Emma C 

Barthel, Walter 

Baylis, Lloyd T. and Leonne P. 

Bartlett, Theodore 

Bean, Anna K 

Bean, Elmer A. and Henry N 

Bee be, Alice W 

Beers, Roland F. and Helen C. 
Belanger, Walter E. and Mary F. 
Benton, Carl R. and Barbara A. 

Bernson, Bob 350 

Bernson, Bob and Edith J 

Bernson, Edith J .. — 

Bertolami, Leo F 110 

Bertolami, Paolina ~ 

Bigelow, Dr. Barry 500 

Billings, Bruce H. and 

Virginia M 

Billings, Bruce H. and Sarah W. 

Billings, James B 250 

Billings, James B. and Marion 

Bingham, Elizabeth A 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B 

Bingham, George C 

Bishop, Fern W. and 

Marjorie B. Sharp 

Black, Everett A .. 4 

Black, Everett A. and Anne E. ... 
Blake, Charles H. and Helen L. 
Blake, Donald D. and Alicia B. 

Boccadoro, Joseph and Ida 

Bogner, Walter F. and Edith 

Bonia, Walter J ... 

Booth, Alice Bu.vrage.... ~ 

Booth, Robert 3 

Booth, Robert H 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 85,000 

Boston Edison Co .. ~- 143,666 

Boston & Maine R.R 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowles, Mildred E 225 

Bowles, William - 1,275 

Boy?e. Brothers ~ 2,975 



4,950 


222.75 


100 


4.50 


1,000 


45.00 


1,650 


74.25 


6,000 


270.00 


3,075 


138.38 


47,000 


2.115.00 


10,650 


479.25 


7,400 


333.00 


100 


4.58 


1,000 


60.75 


3,350 


150.75 


18,000 


810.00 


4,700 


216.45 


400 


18.00 




22.50 


7,280 


327.60' 


750 


33.75 




11.25 


10,650 


479.25 


9,250 


416.25 


250 


11.25 


500 


22.50 


10,200 


459.00 




18 


32,000 


1,440.00 


10,500 


472.50 


4,550 


204.75 


100 


4.50 


9,200 


414.00 


5,400 


243.00 


500 


22.50 




.13 


14,300 


643.50 




3,825.00 




6,464.97 


900 


40.50 


7,000 


315.00 


12,150 


556.88 


4,000 


237.38 


12,000 


673.88 



VALUATION LIST 



211 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Boyce, Manley B 

Boyce, Manley B. and Alice M. ... 

Boyce, Michael J 

Bradford, Robert L. and 

Martha A 

Bradley, James and Mary E 

Bradshaw, Fred and Julia S 

Bradshaw, Sally B. Davis 

Briggs, Susan L 

Brisson, Norman F 250 

Brooks, Albert S. and Maude M. 

Brooks, Albert 500 

Brooks, Paul 

Brown, Elizabeth G 

Brown, Marion I. and 

Bernice I. Stevens 

Brown, Robert P. and Polly F. 
Browne, Secor D. and Mary D. 
Browning, Edgar C. and 

Katherine A „ 

Browning, George U 2,760 

Buerger, Martin J. and Lila 

Burckett, Douglas M. and 

Phillippa C 

Burgess, Catherine M 

Burgess, Aubrey W. and Rebecca 

Burke, Francis J 

Burns, Melvin P 

Burns, William C. and 

Daisy May Day 

Busfield, Gibson L. and 

Marilyn A 

Butcher, Charles R 

Butcher, Henry A. Jr. and 

Margaret V 

Butcher, Ralph E 450 

Buthman, Fred A. and Ednah E. 

Butler, Wm. H. and Mary G 

Buttrick, David Co 2,500 

Buxton, David and Lois Pardee 

Calkins, Ramona T. and Whittier 
Campbell, Coburn A. L. and 
Louise J 



3,000 


135.00 


2,500 


112.50 


4,500 


202.50 


5,300 


238.50 


4,550 


204.75 


5,000 


225.00 


10,500 


472.50 


13,500 


607.50 


100 


15.75 


5,400 


243.00 




22.50 


4,750 


438.75 


14,000 


630.00 


3,000 


135.00 


5,900 


265.50 


7,000 


315.00 


4,950 


222.75 


0,000 


394.20 


12,000 


540.00 


500 


22.50 


1,500 


67.50 


3,250 


146.25 


4,250 


191.25 


3,050 


137.25 



3,000 



135.00 



5,500 


247.50 


1,950 


87.75 


2.100 


94.50 


4,300 


213.75 


500 


22.50 


4,750 


213.75 


10.100 


567.00 


6,000 


270.00 



1,500 



4,200 



202.50 



189.00 



212 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Campbell. Fannie S. and 

Adeline S 

Campobasso, Anthony B. and 

Dorothy M 

Campobasso, Ethel 

Campobasso, Joseph R „ 

Cannella, Calagero and 

Francesca 1.100 

Cannon, Ellen DeN. and 

Bradford 

Carman, Eleanor T 

Carney, Florence T 

Carrig, James A „ 

Carrig, James A 

Carstensen, Warren and 

Evelyn G 

Cassidy, Henry J. and Verna E. 

Cassidy, Verna E 

Catoia, Angelo and Mary J 

Catoia, Anthony J. and 

Lucy M. A 

Causer, William O. and Mary E. 
Chapin, Robert C. and 

Margaret E 

Chapin, Louise B. and Bertha L. 

Chapman, James S 

Chapman, Lily T 

Chase, Ann 

Chellis, Herbert X. and 

Eleanor M 

Chipman, Robert H 

Chisholm, Edward C. and 

Margaret F 

Chu, Chauncey C. and Margaret 
Church, Robert T. and 

Priscilla S 

Cibel, Stanley A. and Thelma W. 
Churchill, Robert R. and June D. 

Ciraso, Michael and Amelia 

Clark, George A 45 

Clark, W. Van Alan and Mary H. 

Coan, James P 100 

Coan, Thomas F., Estate of 



.500 



3,800 



337.50 



3,100 


139.50 


1,500 


67.50 


1,820 


81.90 



220.00 



22,800 


1.026.00 


10,200 


459.00 


3.575 


160.88 


1,700 


76.50 


2.400 


108.00 


3.000 


135.00 


3,650 


164.25 


1.300 


58.50 


3.100 


139.50 


2,850 


128.25 


3,300 


148.50 


3,500 


157.50 


11,500 


517.50 


4,775 


214.88 


750 


33.75 


11.300 


508.50 


4,500 


202.50 


4.000 


180.00 


4.900 


220.50 


1.000 


45.00 


10,100 


454.50 


6,300 


283.50 


5,400 


243.00 


3,650 


164.25 


3,650 


166.28 


6,400 


288.00 


3.250 


150.75 


3.350 


150.75 



VALUATION LIST 



213 





Aggregate 


Aggi-egate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Coane, John H 

Coane, John H. Jr 

Coburn, Edward S 1,195 

Codman, Thomas N., et al Tr 750 

Codman, Dorothy S. F. M 

Cole, Edwin M. and Lucy F 

Cole, Nancy W. ..~ 

Comey, Arthur C. and 

Elizabeth P . 

Community Store 1,500 

Comstock, Joan B * 

Conant, Lily R 

Conary, Frances P 

Concannon, Marian E 

Condit, Robert P. and Phyllis C. 
Conlin, James J. and Winifred I. 
Conhair, John J. and Margaret J. 
Connally, J. Irving and 

Evelyn 

Conti, Bartolomeo B 

Cook, Harry and John F 

Cook Brothers 600 

Corcoran, Francis J. 

Cormey, Henry J. and Illione \v\ 

Corrigan, Edward D 

Corrigan, John F. and Mary 

Corrigan, Leo W 

Corrigan, Martin ~ 

Corrigan, Mary K 

Corrigan, Phillip K. and Muriel 

Costeilo, John D 

Costello, William B 

Cotoni, Carolana M 

Cotoni, Joseph 3,100 

Cousins, Ashley B '. '. 

Cousins, Fred E 

Cousins, Harold S 

Cousins, Laurence B. and 

Jeanne B 

Cousins, Laurence B 50 

Cousins, Willis N 

Cowles, Addison and 

Alexandra C 



3,400 


153.00 


2,400 


108.00 


6,200 


332.78 


67,300 


3,062.25 


5,000 


225.00 


11,200 


504.00 


8,800 


396.00 


8,000 


360.00 




67.50 


7,350 


330.75 


9,000 


405.00 


4,500 


202.50 


4,200 


189.00 


5,000 


225.00 


1,100 


49.50 


3,100 


139.50 


3,475 


156.38 


6,750 


303.75 


4,950 


222.75 




27.00 


3,000 


135.00 


900 


40.50 


3,500 


157.50 


7,000 


315.00 


2,300 


103.50 


2,400 


108.00 


1,500 


67.50 


3,400 


153.00 


100 


4.50 


1,800 


81.00 


4,600 


207.00 




139.50 


2,400 


108.00 


3,600 


162.00 


19,250 


866.25 


4,400 


198.00 




2.25 


3,450 


155.25 


5,150 


231.75 



214 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Valve of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Crane, Charles E. and Hazel G. 
Crawford, John D. and 



15,000 



675.00 



Joanna W . 




5,000 


225.00 


Crawford, Marshall, Estate of...... 




8,750 


393.75 


Creelman, Gilmore B. and 








Alice M — ...» ~ 




3,550 


159.75- 


Creelman, Gilmore B. Jr ~ . 


50 




2.25 


Crider, John H. and Maxine R. ... 




8,600 


387.00 


Croft, Robert .. > ~...~..~ 




200 


9.00' 


Crook, Russell G 




3,000 


135.00 


Crowley, Timothy J ..... . 




2,000 


90.00= 


Crowson, Leslie W. and 








Madeline W ~ „ 




6,800 


306.00 


Crozier, Christina B. - ~ 




5,000 


225.00 


Culver, Perry J. & Kate S 




3,000 


135.00 


Cunnert, Fritz, Est. of 


1,000 




45.00 


Cunningham, Elizabeth A 




500 


22.50 


Cunningham, Elizabeth A. and 








Edward B. .. ~ ~. 




3,200 


144.00 


Cunningham, George E ^ . 




4,915 


221. IS 


Cunningham, Harold L. and 








Corrine ~ -.....- 




3,600 


162.00 


Cunningham Robert M 




2,900 


130.50 


Gushing, Gustave 




4,500 


202,50 


Dahl, Thyra ........ - 




5,800 


261.00 


Damico, Louise ~ 




2,350 


105.75 


Damico, Ralph 


50 




2.25- 


Danosky, Edward A. „ 


350 


1,400 


78.75 


Danosky, Edward A. and 








Mary C - ....- -...- 




3,600 


162.00 


Danosky, Stefania 


1,000 


9,650 


479.25 


D'Arrigo Bros. Co _ 




2,000 


90.00 


Dflvprmort Robert H. Jr. 




4,300 


193.50 


Davis, Alfred M. .~ - 


1,250 


4,750 


270.00 


Davis, Bradford D. and 








Barbara G. ~........ ....» 




10,200 


459.00 


Davis, E. Russell 




19,000 


855.00 


Davis, Prescott L. , ... 


2,600 


9,100 


526.50 


Davis, Saville R. and Anita V 




7,500 


337.50 


Davison Archibald T. ~ .. 




13,000 


585.00 


Davison, Everett H .. 




2,600 


117.00 


Dean, Emma W —.- 




3,200 


144.00 


Dean, Louis W. - > 


7,750 


9,800 


789.75 



VALUATION LIST 



215 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



3,000 


135.00 


2,000 


90.00 


2,200 


99.00 


7,100 


319.50 




40.50 


10,800 


486.00 


3,500 


157.50 


34,500 


1,552.50 


1,000 


434.25 



Dean, William M - 19 1,000 45.86 

Dean, William M. and 

Lorraine C _ - 

Dee, Helena A _„„ 

Dee, Thomas J., Est. of 

DeFord, William and 

Elinor S , 

Denehy, Edward J „ 900 

Denehy, Edward J. and 

Bernadette J. - 

Denio, F. Winchester « 

DeNormandie, Alice W 

DeNormandie, James 8,650 

DeNormandie, James and 

Martha „ 9,950 447.75 

DeNormandie, James and 

Robert L 

DeNormandie, Robert L 

DePavla, Dominick 

Dewey, Davis R., II 

Diamond, James E 

Dodge, Orien B 

Doherty, Josephine C 

Doherty, Mary E., Margaret 

A., and Marjorie J 2,000 

Doherty, Matthew H. d/b as 

Doherty's Garage 1,600 

Doherty, Matthew H. and 

Elizabeth H 

Dole, Gertrude E 

Dominichello, Dominic 

Dominichello, Frank 935 

Dominichello, Frank and 

Mattie M 

Donaldson, Est. of Charlotte H. 

Donaldson, Donald 60 

Donaldson, Gordon A. and 

Elizabeth A 

Donaldson, Malcolm D 

Donaldson, Robert D. Jr 

Donaldson, Robert D 

Donnelly, Bernard F. and 

Josephine B l,5Q0 67.50 



33,550 


1,509.75 


21,925 


986.63 


500 


22.50 


15,600 


702.00 


900 


40.50 


2,850 


128.25 


17,000 


765.00 



90.00 



•2.00 



11,300 


508.50 


2,880 


129.60 


500 


22.50 




42.08 


3.800 


171.00 


8.000 


360.00 




2.70 


7,000 


315.00 


8,250 


••571.25 


6,500 


292.50 


67,000 


3,042.00 



216 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Dorian, Newart 

Dougherty, Andrew J . 2,535 

Dougherty, Dennis M , 

Dresser, Charles N. and Ruth C 
DuBois, Anson M. and Olive S. 
DuBois, Eliot and Barbara — — 

East, John A. and Edla A. „.._ 

Eaton, Gertrude S -..-, 

Ehlert, Heirs of Ellen. . 

Emerson, Beatrice W. and 

Goulet, Dorothy W. „ ...... 

Emerson, Beatrice W 

Emerson, Heirs of Edward W 

Emerson, Heirs of Ralph W 

Erickson, Leonard V. and 

Martha F > 

Evans, Lucius W. and 

Virginia C. -. ~.~ 

Fairbanks, Rollin - ........ 

Farley, Louis C. Jr. and 

Isabel K - _....„.......'.... 

Farnsworth, Kenneth C. and 

Marguerite M 

Fedock, Metro and Hazel A 

Fernrald, Alvin E. 200 

Fillmore, Bruce R. and 

Eleanor L. — .- 

Fillmore, Ernest C ~ 

Finnerty, James L. and Anna C. 
Fitts, Charles K. and 

Gertrude W 

Flanagan, James and 

Wilhelmina G ~ 

Fleck, Richard C. and 

Frances R. - » 

Fletcher, Walter and Helen F. 
Flint, Edw. W., Ex U/W of 

Ephraim Flint - 

Flint, Henry .............. 500 

Flint, Josephine R 

Flint, Warren F 4,050 

Floyd, Olive B -.... 



3,750 


168.75 


6,350 


399.83 


2,900 


130.&0 


6,200 


279.00 


5,100 


229.50 


4,900 


220.50 


5,500 


247.50 


7,500 


337.50 


5,625 


253.13 


1,300 


58.50 


1,000 


45.00 


500 


22.50 


500 


22.50 


5,000 


225.00 


16,500 


742.50 


12,500 


562.50 


4,500 


202.50 


15,500 


697.50 


2,650 


119.25 


5,900 


274.50 


4;400 


198.00 


6,800 


306.00 


3,200 


144.00 


16,500 


742.50 


700 


31.50 


10,600 


477.00 


6,750 


303.75 


1,900 


85.50 




22.50 


11,000 


495.00 


13,000 


767.25 


4,500 


202.50 



VALUATION LIST 



217 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Flynn, Frank J. 

Flynn, Helen C 

Foley, Harold F. and Rita E 

Forbes, Sherman H. and 

Annabell 

Fradd, Norman W 

Frazier, Joseph G. and 

Harriet E 

Fryatt, Thomas F 

Fuller, Ernest L.^and Doris O. ... 

Garland, Joseph and Mira C 

Garrison, David L. and Alice E. 

Gary, John E. and Maida F 

Geary, Edward T. and 

Katherine E 

Gertz, George L. and Edith A 

Gibbs, Norman E. and Leigh H. 

Giblin, Mary E. and Ruth E 

Gilbert, John W. and 

Josephine L 

Gilbert, Mary J 

Gilboy, Glennon and 

Elizabeth W 

Giles, Edmund W 1,350 

Giles, Edmund W. and 

Muriel H 

Giles, Muriel and Edmund W 

Giles, Thomas T 1,300 

Giles, Thomas T. and Stella A. ... 
Gilfoy, Donald A. and Helen B. 

Gill, Mary 

Glazier, L. Gordon and Gertrude 300 

Goodfellow, Daniel R. and 

Eleanora A 

Gordon, Marie C 

Grabill, Elliott V. and 

Martha L 

Graf, Malcolm 

Grason, Rufus L. and Edna B 

Gray, Robert W 

Greco, Louis and Katherine T. ... 
Greene, Frederick H. Jr., and 

Helen H 



400 


18.00 


8,700 


391.50 


1,600 


72.00 


5,500 


247.50 


7,500 


337.50 


4,200 


189.00 


5,200 


234.00 


9,300 


418.50 


2,500 


112.50 


6,200 


279.00 


7,000 


315.00 


8,300 


373.50 


4,200 


189.00 


7,600 


342.00 


6,630 


298.35 


2,500 


112.50 


2,500 


112.50 


10,000 


450.00 




60.75 


7,100 


319.50 


5,100 


229.50 




58.50 


10,400 


468.00 


12,000 


540.00 


9,500 


427.50 


19,000 


868.50 


5,000 


225.00 


4,200 


189.00 


11,000 


495.00 


2,000 


90.00 


700 


31.50 


6,600 


297.00 


600 


27.00 



10.900 



490.50 



218 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Griffin, Harriet S. ~ 7,000 315.00 

Grinnell, William L. and 

Virginia B — .. ^..^ — . 

Gropius, Walter and Use....... „ 

Gross, T. A. O. and 

Judith C. F 

Gustafson, Edwin Anton and 

Doris Margaret ....... > 

Haden, Russell L. and 

Constance J ~...~ — ■> 

Hagerty, Julia C ..-. 

Hagmann, Fridolin 

Hale, Hazen G. Jr. and 

Gail Robinson „ ....... 

Haley, Arthur E 

Hamilton, Bessie E . 

Hanlon, Albert W 

Harding, Catherine ~ 

Harling, Ernest J 

Harrington, F. Frank, Est. of 

Harrington, Katherine A « 

Harrington, Winthrop W 

Hart, Frederick R ~ 

Hart, Joseph S .. ~ 

Hart, Wm. E. and Isabella C 

Hartman, Henry F 

Hatheway, Louise A „ 4,710 

Hayden, Nellie B. „ 

Healey, Harry R. Jr. and 

Jeanne C. ~ 

Heck, Mary Higbee 

Hedge, Mary A 

Helburn, Peter and Margaret 

Held, Arnold E. and Mary A 

Henderson, Ernest „ 250 

Henderson, Gerard C. and 

Edith M - 

Henderson, Mary S 

Henderson, Robert S. and 

Carolyn H 

Henley, Archibald and Lottie ...... 

Henley, Archie E. and 

Wilfred B -....- - 2,500 112.50 



7,000 


315.00 


14,50.0 


652.50 


5,300 


238.50 


4,000 


180.00 


5,700 


256.50 


3,000 


135.00 


8,500 


382.50 


1,400 


63.00 


1,500 


67.50 


4,800 


216.00 


5,000 


225.00 


2,500 


112.50 


4,500 


202.50 


1,750 


78.75 


2,000 


90.00 


4,100 


184.50 


200 


9.00 


7,900 


355.50 


9,200 


414.00 


3,700 


166.50 


133,950 


6,239.70 


300 


13.50 


5,200 


234.00 


30,800 


1,386.00 


10,500 


472.50 


2,200 


99.00 


3,700 


177.75 




11.25 


5,000 


225.00 


46,000 


2,070.00 


5,000 


225.00 


4,640 


208.80 



VALUATION LIST 



219 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Henley, Merrill J. and Ida. 

Henry, Hall M. and 

Addie McAllister 

Herlihy, Maurice K. and 

Jean E 

Herman, Edwards W 

Herthel, Stephen W. and 

Evelyn S ~ 

Hess, Kenneth W. and Alice B. 
Hews, Charles A. and Annie F. ... 
Hinds, Edward H. and Edith M. 

Hinds, Evelyn W 

Hoar, George W. and 

Norman W 

Hollingsworth, Lowell M. and 

Florence S 

Holmes, William d/b as 

Lincoln Hdwe. Store 1,500 

Hoover, Henry B. and 

Lucretta J 

Hornor, Townsend and 

Barbara Graham 

Houghton, John J. and Lillian 

Howard, Elizabeth F 

Howard, Esther T 

Hoyt, Harrison and Shirley J 

Hunt, Lewis E 

Hunt, Merrill ; 

Hunt, Pearson 

Hunt, Pearson and Merrill T 

Hunter, Euphemia J., Heirs of... 

Hunter, Robert R 1,000 

Huntley, George F. and 

Lottie D 

Huntley, Medford E. and 

Blanche L T . 

Huntley, Oland F. and 

Alberta T 

Huntley, Oland F 50 

Hurd, Nancy Dabney 

Hyde, Benjamin D. and 
'Mildred B 

Irwin, Mary M 



1,000 


45.00 


10,000 


450.00 


3,300 


148.50 


12,200 


549.00 


13,650 


614.25 


9,500 


427.50 


3,500 


157.50 


100 


4.50 


8,000 


360.00 


9,500 


427.50 


7,000 


315.00 



7,300 



67.50 



328.50 



6,000 


270.00 


3,800 


171.00 


13,000 


585.00 


9,400 


423.00 


2,700 


121.50 


4,000 


180.00 


13,500 


607.50 


400 


18.00 


6,500 


292.50 


9,600 


432.00 




45.00 


4,600 


207.00 


3,700 


166.50 


2,900 


L30.50 




2.25 


9,100 


409.50 


8,000 


360.00 


10,500 


472.50 



220 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Jackson, Dorothy W 

Jacobs, May L 

Jenney, Charles J. and 

Katrina C 

Jensen, Holgar J. and Grace A. 

Jensen, Olin A. and Agnes E 

Johansen, Rose May 

John, DeWitt 

Johnson, Ernest L. and Grace M. 

Johnson, Fern A 

Jones, Chester L. and Anne B. ... 

Keene, Clifton R 

Keily, Delbar P. and 

Gertrude F 

Keizer, Harold . 

Kelliher, John J 

Kennedy, Albert E 

Kennedy, John T. and 

Albert E 

Kennedy Bros 

Kern, Walter P. and Nancy G. 

Killoran, Martha 

Kimball, Robert M. and 

Barbara P 

Kindleberger, Charles P. and 

Sarah M 

King, Abigail A 

King, William T 

Kingsbury, Roy S. and Ann B. 

Kinney, Robert C 

Kinsler, Herman F. and 

Louise M 

Kirkpatrick, David W. and 

Margaret M - 

Kistiakowsky, George B. and 

Irma E 

Knowles, Harry B. Jr 

Knowles, Wilma E .... 

Kolyshkin, George 

Kubik, Charles S. and Emily K. 

Ladd, Edward H. Jr. and 

Agnes E - - 



500 



50 



100 



12,000 


540.00 


15,000 


675.00 


5,500 


247.50 


3,100 


139.50 


5,100 


229.50 


1,500 


67.50 


7,050 


317.25 


11,500 


517.50 


3,000 


135.00 


5,000 


225.00 


5,000 


225.00 


3,900 


175.50 


1,500 


67.50 


3,800 


171.00 


5,800 


261.00 


150 


6.75 




22.50 


1,000 


45.00 


3,850 


173.25 



9,100 



5,500 



409.50 



5,450 


245.25 


2,000 


540.00 


5,700 


708.75 


2,500 


112.50 


2,000 


90.00 



247.50 



5,000 


225.00 


11,500 


517.50 




4.50 


5,000 


225.00 


3,030 


136.35 


6,000 


270.00 



5,250 



236.25 



VALUATION LIST 



221 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Lahey, Heirs of James 

Lahnstein, Karl F. and 

Margaret A 

Langille, Claire M. 250 

Langton, William G 

Larrabee, Leonard C. and 

Peggy S 

Lavery, Francis W. and 

Veronica J 

Lavrakas, Fof o 

Lawson, Harold E 1,500 

Lawton, John J. and Beatrice G. 

Leary, Edward B 

Leavitt, Donald P. and 

Christine P 

LeBlanc, Alphonse J. and 

Alice M 

LeBlanc, Philias 50 

LeBlanc, Philias and Lena 

Lee, Edwin John 

LeMann, John 

Lennon, James V. and Elin 

Leslie, Maurice A. and Annie M. 
Liddick, Harold S. and 

Virginia D 

Ligda, Myron G. H. and 

Evelyn D 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 250 

Lincoln, Kenneth C. and 

Virginia .. 

Linscott, Donald A. Jr. and 

Grace M 

Litte, Rudolph 

Livengood, Eleanor C. H 

Llanover Trust, 

Ernest Henderson, Tr 

Lorrey, Mildred J 

Lothrop, John W. and Ellen D. 

Loud, John F. and Mary L 

Lovejoy, Evelene T 

Luce, Peter Paul and Margaret... 

Lummus, John W. and Ann A 

Lunt, Heirs of Charles 



1,500 


67.50 


3,200 


144.00 




11.25 


7,000 


315.00 


5,900 


265.50 


5,700 


256.50 


2,150 


96.75 


7,450 


402.75 


5,100 


229.50 


350 


15.75 


9,000 


405.00 


2,500 


112.50 




2.25 


5,850 


263.25 


8,800 


396.00 


2,850 


128.25 


3,800 


171.00 


4,340 


195.30 


6,700 


301.50 


2,900 


130.50 




11.25 



3,000 



135.00 



4,400' 


198.00 


3,150 


141.75 


3,800 


171.00 


6,100 


274.50 


5,575 


250.88 


10,500 


472.50 


10,000 


450.00 


10,250 


461.25 


8,250 


371.25 


4,050 


182.25 


2,600 


117.00 



222 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Lustwerk, George and Julia 

Lynch, Edward H. Jr 

Lyon, Edward 

Lyons, John J. and Ann V 

Lyons, Martin and W. A 

Lyon, Ruth 

MacFarland, Charles C. and 

Phyllis M 

MacFarland, Ernest H 

Maclnnis, Daniel A, Jr. and 

Francis Clarke 

Mackenzie, Roland C. ~ 

MacLaurin, Richard C. and 

Ellen m 

MacLean, Heirs of Hector J. 

M. Arnold MacLean, Adm 

MacLeod, Edward and Hester M. 
MacLeod, Edward Jr. and 

Mary M 

MacRae, Manning- W 

McClennen, Alan and Louise H. 
McCune, William J. and 

Elizabeth 

McHugh, Katherine 

McHugh, Mary F 

McLellan, John W. and Julia C. 

McMillan, James B - 

Mc Shane, Nellie 

Mahan, Russell P 

Mahar, Raymond and 

Gertrude M 

Mallett, Herbert A. and Eva M. 
Malloy, Robert M. and Irene C. 

Mann, David W. - 

Mann, David W. and Iva S 

Mannarino, Heirs of Anna 

Manning, Joseph J. and 

Catherine L 

Manzelli, John 

Mar, James W. and Edith 

Marchetti, John W. and 

Sarah G 

Martin, Fred and Marie 



200 



,500 



5,000 


225.00 


3,600 


162.00 


7,800 


351.00 


400 


18.00 


4,005 


180.23 


3,700 


166.50 


2,750 


123.75 


6,000 


270.00 


3,050 


137.25 


12,000 


540.00 



11,000 



495.00 



4,350 


195.75 


2,850 


128.25 


1,100 


49.50 


5,500 


257.50 


12,500 


562.50 


8.300 


373.50 


500 


22.50 


6,000 


270.00 


3,150 


141.75 


1,600 


72.00 


100 


4.50 


8,000 


360.00 


3,200 


144.00 


2,600 


117.00 


7,500 


337.50 




292,50 


22,900 


1,030.50 


1,500 


67.50 


4,700 


211.50 


2,200 


99.00 


4,000 


180.00 


8,000 


360.00 


5,000 


225.00 



VALUATION LIST 



223 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Martin, John 0. and Candida W. 2,500 112.50 

Martin, Wilhelmina W 9,500 427.50 

Mascari, Leonard E. and 

Grace B i 11,000 495.00 

Matthews, Ida L. and 

Marion Clark 

Mead, Varnum R. and Janice H. 
Meade, Edmund J. and 

Eleanor H 

Melanson, Leonard J. and Mary 

Mele, John A. and Sarah L 

Mellish, Eugene D. and Nancy 

Meriam, Richard S. and Alice G. 
Meyer, John R. Jr. and 

Marjorie R 

Meyer, Robert V 

Michel, Jules J. 

Militzer, Raymond E. and 

Martha B. 

Miller, Henry D. and Mary E 

Miller, Mary G 

Mills, Cecil R. and Lillian M 

Monks, Caroline T 

Monks, John P 2,200 

Monks, John P. and Ann S 

Moody, Charles P. and 

Josephine C. 

Moore, Herbert L. Jr. and 

Sylvia W 

Moore, Paul 

Morgan, Henry M. and Gwen G. 

Morris, Milliage E 160 

Morris, Milliage E. and 

Beatrice M 1,500 G7.50 

Morris, Robert E. F. and 

Clara D 

Morris, Robert H. and Irene S. 

Morrissey, Elizabeth Ann 

Morrissey, John J 500 

Morse, Thomas R 

Moses, John P. and Alice W 

Moszka, Stanley E. and Anna 

Mukhitarian, Samuel and 

Stephanie 3,050 L37.25 



3,500 


157.50 


4,500 


202.50 


3,500 


157.50 


4,000 


180.00 


4,300 


193.50 


1,100 


49.50 


12,350 


555,75 


5,250 


236.25 


5,300 


238.50 


10,040 


451.80 


18,000 


810.00 


8,300 


373.50 


6,000 


270.00 


2,500 


112.50 


5,750 


258.75 




99.00 


48,900 


2,200.50 


6,100 


274.50 


10,200 


459.00 


100 


4.50 


7,000 


315.00 




7.20 



3,700 


166.50 


4,500 


202.50 


1,900 


85.50 


5,800 


283.50 


12,300 


553.50 


6,500 


292.50 


2,800 


126.00 



224 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Murphy, Bridget 

Murphy, Cyrus W. and Persis S. 

Murphy, Edward W 

Murphy, Heirs of Jeremiah. 

Murphy, Mina Dorothea , „ 

Murphy. Otis W. and Patricia 

Murphy, William F. ...... 

Neary, Patrick J. and 

Alice B ...... — 

Nielsen, Svend H. and 

Virginia R. 



Nelson, Albert E. and 

Marjorie E ~.~... 

Nelson, Erik J. .. . 

Nelson, W. Newton and 

Eleanor R ~ ~ 

Neumann, Ernest P. and Sylvia 

Neville, Ellen M., Heirs of 

Neville, Mary A. and Delia M. ...... 2,425 

Newell, Joseph S. and Lena M. ... 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co 65,100 

Newton. Hariand B. and 

Ethel H. „ - - 

Newton, Hazel H 

Nichols, Walter and Ethel D 

Niles, Robert I. and Virginia M. 
Northeastern Gas Transmission 

Co 

Norton, Paul L 

Norton, Paul L. and Margaret ... 
Nystrom. Foster H. and 

Edna C _ 

Ockels, Theodore S. and 

Rosemarie G. 

Ogden, Warren G., Jr 

O'Reilly, Andrew J. and 

Josephine M - 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. and 

Camilla M 

Osborne, Gordon and Freda W. ... 

O'Sullivan, William J 700 



4,500 


202.50 


2,950 


132.75 


5,000 


225.00 


3,500 


157.50 


3,500 


157.50 


50 


2.25 


10,750 


483.75 


4,200 


189.00 


10,000 


450.00 


5,900 


265.50 


1,500 


67.50 


9,850 


443.25 


8,250 


371.25 


900 


40.50 


4,350 


304.88 


8,500 


382.50 


4,000 


3,109.50 


7,300 


328.50 


5,800 


261.00 


5,100 


229.50 


6,700 


301.50 


43,100 


1,939.50 


1,500 


67.50 


6,500 


292.50 



5,900 

300 
6,000 

5,000 



265.50 

13.50 

270.00 

225.00 



3,800 


171.00 


19,940 


897.30 




31.50 



VALUATION LIST 



225 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Tiaxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


E.-tate 



0' Sullivan, William J. and 

Mary E „ 

Owen, Carleton W. and 

Marion J 

Paddock, Louis E. and Anne E. ... 

Page, Elliott F. and Emily R 

Page, William N. and 

Elizabeth J - 

Paine, Charles H : 

Pallotta, Henry and Eleanor A. ... 
Palmer, Attelio A. and Kathryne 

Palmer, Eleanor M 

Panetta, Franklin and Theresa 

Panetta, Pasquale 535 

Panetta, Pasquale and Mary 

Parish, Edward C. Jr. and 

Joan DeF 

Parker, Jackson 

Parker, William J. Jr. and 

Evangeline C „ 

Parker, William J. Jr ,. 

Parks, Henry A. and Harriet A. ... 

Pattinson, Mary I 

Pavlo, Samuel G 

Pazzano, Charles H. Jr. and 

Mary R 

Pearson, Florist (Partnership 

Theo, A. Pearson) 

Peck, Mildred E 

Pederson, Sarah A 

Peirce, Harriet T 

Pellandini, Robert T. and 

Virginia A 

Peloquin, Roy J. and Alice M 

Pertzoff, Constantin A 1,010 

Pertzoff, Constantin A. and 

Olga 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, John R. and Mary V. 

Peterson, Roy C 

Phillips, Henry B. and 

Charlotte T 



5,000 


1,575.00 


5,000 


225.00 


7,000 


315.00 


3,800 


171.00 


8,000 


360.00 


200 


9.00 


4,500 


202.50 


4,600 


207.00 


7,500 


337.50 


350 


15.75 




24.08 


4,400 


198.00 


6,900 


310.50 


3,100 


139.50 


1,750 


78.75 


3,625 


163.13 


2,300 


103.50 


6,600 


297.00 


400 


18.00 



250 



11.25 



2,500 


112.50 


3,850 


173.25 


1,100 


49.50 


4,200 


189.00 


4,700 


211.50 


4,300 


193.50 




45.45 


38,740 


1,743.30 


9,600 


432.00 


7,500 


337.50 


3,300 


148.50 



16,250 



731.25 



226 



APPENDIX 



Aggregate 

Valve of 

Personal 

Name of T.axpayer Estate 

Pierce, Charles Eliot and 

Dora R 

Place, Daniel N 

Poinier, Donald and Roberta 

Pollard, Frederick H. et al 

Poole, Ruth E. and Frederick 

Poor, Jane H. and 

Marion A. Fitch - 1,000 

Potter, Howard L. and 

Barbara V — 

Powers, William C. and 

Clara E 

Preston, Jean W 

Primak, John 985 

Primak, John and Lena...... 

Prouty, C. Newton „ 

Quarton, Gardner and Frances... 

Ragan, Ralph R. and Ruth M 

Rand, Janet G « 

Rand, Lucy K 

Rando, Giovanina 

Reed, Kenneth C. and 

Margaret M » 

Rice, Arthur W. Jr. and 

Pauline K. ~ 

Rice, Richard B. and Grace W. 1,750 

Rice, Warren A. and Ruth H 

Richardson, Howard C ~ 

Richardson, Lyle 

Riley, Allston and Marion 

Riley, William B. and Mary M. ... 
Robbins, Roland W. and 

Geraldine - 

Roberti, Norbert F 

Robichaud, George V. and 

Emma • 

Robinson, Dora J 

Robus, Tamzin K 

Rodiman, Mildred M 

Rogers, Edward H 760 

Rogers, John H., Est. of 

Rollins, Elmer A 



Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Real and 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


12,500 


562.50 


1,150 


51.75 


4,900 


220.50 


13,000 


585.00 


9,700 


436.50 



12,500 



6,000 



1,000 



607.50 



270.00 



2,500 


112.50 


24,000 


1,080.00 




44.33 


10,300 


463.50 


1,000 


45.00 


15,030 


676.35 


5,000 


225.00 


6,000 


270.00 


21,500 


967.50 


4,850 


218.25 



45.00 



12,200 


549.00 


3,300 


227.25 


9,100 


409.50 


200 


9.00 


13,000 


585.00 


10,400 


468.00 


1,900 


85.50 


3,000 


135.00 


4,250 


191.25 


4,500 


202.50 


3,500 


157.50 


2,500 


112.50 


1,000 


45.00 


19,000 


88,9.20 


7,000 


315.00 


800 


36.00 



VALUATION LIST 



227 








Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Persona! 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Rood, Allan and Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. and 

Elizabeth M 

Rooney, John J. and Margaret C. 
Rooney, Leonard A. and 

Helen L 

Root, Harriet E „ 

Root, Lily F , 

Rouner, Thomas J 125 

Rouner, Thomas J. and Doris J. 
Rowe, Lawrence L. and 

Mildred M 

Rowe, Standish 

Rudski, Jan A. and Mary 

Russes, Frances 

Ryan, Anastasia, Heirs of 

Ryan, Frank A 

Ryan, James 100 

Ryan, Lawrence 

Ryan, Mary J 

Sagendorph, George A. and 

Jane H 

Santangelo, Laura B. and John... 

Sargent, Francis B 

Sawtell, Clement C. and 

Adelaide T 

Schaal, Albert A. and Zelpha M. 

Schoales, Gilbert C 100 

Schumacher, August 

Schumacher, August and 

Mary L 

Schwann, William and Sonya 

Scott, Gordon and Beatrice V. 

Scott, Herman H 

Scott, Robert W 500 

Sears, Ann 

Secora, Julia 

Seeckts, Ehlert 

Seeckts, Marion E. and 

Ehlert W 

Segadelli. Doris C. and John J. 
Shank, Maurice E. and Virginia... 
Shaw, Alice DeS 



6,400 



288.00 



5,300 


238.50 


1,500 


67.50 


3,000 


135.00 


600 


27.00 


3,350 


150.75 




5.63 


8,250 


371.25 


1,700 


76.50 


5,500 


247.50 


4,150 


186.75 


2,900 


130.50 


2,400 


108.00 


100 


4.50 




4.50 


3,500 


157.50* 


4,000 


180.00 


16,000 


720.00 


350 


15.75 


10,000 


450.00 


6,000 


270.00 


200 


9.00 




4.50 


2,200 


99.90 


1,000 


45.00 


7,450 


335.25 


8,700 


391.50 


7,500 


337.50 


26,100 


1,197.00 


1,000 


45.00 


2,000 


90.00 


3,250 


146.25 


4,000 


180.00 


500 


22.50 


4,000 


180.00 


20,000 


900.00 



228 



APPENDIX 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Name of Taxpayer Estate 

Shea, Catherine E 

Shepard, Paul F 135 

Sherman, Daniel E 

Sherman, Daniel E. Jr » 1,300 

Sherman, Mary J — 

Sherwin, Edward V ~ 

Shumway, Herbert L. and 

Violet A „ 

Siler, William C. and 

Barbara Jean 

Silva, Manuel, Heirs of. 

Silva, Mary „ 10,950 

Simonds, Anthony J. and 

Lena J .. . . 

Sims, Mildred A 

Sisson, John H. and Barbara 

Small, William A. and Dolina N. 
Smith, Carl D. and Florence C. 

Smith, John E. and Helen M. 

Smith, Sumner 2,000 

Smith-Peterson, Helda D 

Smith, William B. and Mary W. 

Snelling, Caroline ... 

Snelling, Charles A 

Snelling, Dorothy R 

Snelling, Howard and Elizabeth 
Snider, Joseph L. and Greta W. 
Snow, Clayton, R. and 

Carolyn L 

Sorenson, Hans, Heirs of 

Sorenson, J. Oscar 

Spence, Robert A. and Helen M. 
Spencer, Henry W. and 

Marguerite G ~ .... 

Spooner, Lily T 

Sterner, John and Janice M 

Stevens, Kimball C. and 

Eleanor G 

Stewart, Blanch L 

Stockellburg, Arthur A. and 

Jennie L ...» 

Stone, Edith C 

Stratton, Katherine U. : 



Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Real and 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


4,500 


202.50 


4,650 


215.33 


9,800 


441.00 


5,250 


294.75 


150 


6.75 


1,500 


67.50 



7,200 



324.00 



4,400 


198.00 


21,250 


956.25 




492.75 


5,300 


238.50 


1,700 


76.50 


6,300 


283.50 


6,200 


279.00 


5,500 


247.50 


5,000 


225.00 


55,700 


2,596.50 


2,150 


96.75 


3,900 


175.50 


4,500 


202.50 


4,100 


184.50 


4,300 


193.50 


4,500 


202.50 


7,650 


344.25 


2,300 


103.50 


4,050 


182.25 


4,250 


191.25 


6,000 


270.00 


1,500 


67.50 


4,250 


191.25 


7,400 


333.00 


5,500 


247.50 


600 


27.00 


1,500 


67.50 


300 


13.50 


10,600 


477.00 



VALUATION LIST 



229 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Street, Earle B. and Janet H 

Stuart, Edward T 

Sturgis, Alanson H. Jr. and 

Anne H 

Sturm, Henry A. Jr. and 

Harriet W. 

Sullivan, Winifred P 

Swanson, Alfred and Alma 

Swanson, Arthur W. and 

Helen K 

Swanson, John, Realty Corp 

Swift, Orlando B 

Swift, Orlando B. and Janice B. 
Swinconeck, John J. 

Taillacq, Elsie 

Tarbell, George G., et al. Tr. 

u/w of George G. Tarbell 

Tarbell, George G. Jr 

Tarky, William J. Jr 

Tasker, Eliza J 

Taylor, Beulah A 

Taylor, Edward S. and 

Constance R 

Teabo, Eugene and Alice M 

Tew, John B 

Thiessen, Arthur E. and Laura... 
Thoma, Henry F. and Mary A. 

Thorpe, Margaret M 

Thorson, Robert H. and 

Kathryn F. 

Todd, Mabel H 

Todd, Pauline E. Adm. u/w 

C. Lee Todd 

Toler, Louise C 

Tonseth, Didrick and Phebe 

Torode, Herbert L. and 

Lorraine S 

Townsend, John B. and Helen A. 
Tracy, John W. and 

Gertrude G 

Tracey, Joseph R. and 

Elizabeth C 

Tracey, Elizabeth C 



200 



4,500 
1,500 

4,750 



2,830 

500 
8,300 



202.50 
67.50 

213.75 



5,200 


234.00 


1,200 


54.00 


7,450 . 


335.25 


7,600 


342.00 


12,500 


562.50 




9.00 


7,650 


344.25 


1,600 


72.00 


4,000 


180.00 


20,200 


909.00 


8,000 


360.00 


1,000 


45.00 


3,500 


157.50 


5,050 


227.25 


7.150 


321.75 


900 


40.50 


15,400 


693.00 


13,500 


607.50 


5,000 


225.00 


5,750 


258.75 


7,100 


319.50 


18,500 


832.50 


26,900 


1,210.50 


500 


22.50 


1,850 


83.25 


3,000 


135.00 


2,000 


90.00 



12 7.35 

22.50 
373.50 



230 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Trenholm, Charles E. and 
Harriet M ....... 

Trull, Sybil Shaw, Ex 

Tyler, Ethel A., Admx. 
Est. of Fred Tyler 

Tyler, Watson, Heirs of... 



Umbrello, Francis 

Umbrello, Francis and Virginia... 

VanLeer, Hans L 

VanLeer, Hans L. and Mary K. 
Van Wart, Walter L. and 

Mary A ....... 

Vance, Jane K .. 

Victor's Market 



4,930 
5,133 

1,500 



Waible, Wendell Jr. and 

Florence E 

Wales, Andrew M. and Betty R. 

Walker, A. Bruce - 

Waller, Ervin S 

Ward, Henry DeC. and Janet G. 

Warner, Henrietta S. - 

Warner, Henry E 

Warner, John B. and Barbara K. 

Warren, Wallace G - 

Washburn, Mabel L. and 

Rachel W - 

Washburn, Rachel W 

Watt, Norman B. and Martha E. 

Webb, John F - 

Webb, Rosella 

Weiner, Julius W., et al d/b as 

Wyner Realty Co 

Wellman, Bertram and Cora B. ... 

Wells, George and K. W. 

Westcott, A. E 

Westcott, Charles W. C. 

and Mary - 

Westcott, Vernon C. and 

Mary A 

Wheeler, Elizabeth F., Ann H., 

Mary L. and Ruth Gale 

Western Union Tel. & Tel 



725 
200 

2,700 
2,700 

8,950 

900 
11,000 

1,600 
18,700 



5,700 

1,000 

250 

500 

12,000 

9,500 

20,050 

10,700 

5,150 

4,400 
100 
3,000 
9,000 
5,500 

4,600.. 
4,300 
8,200 
4,700 

3,500 

5,700 

17,150 



2,800 



32.63 
9.00 

121.50 
121.50 

221.85 
402.75 

271.48 
495.00 

72.00 

841.50 

67.50 

256.50 

45.00 

11.25 

22.50 

540.00 

427.50 

902.25 

481.50 

231.75 

198.00 
4.50 
135.00 
405.00 
247.50 

207.00 
193.50 
369.00 
211.50 

157.50 

256.50 

771.75 
126.00 



VALUATION LIST 



231 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Weston, Georgianna H 

Whitcomb, Sarah I 

White, Katherine S. and John W. 

Whittier. Charles F 65 

Whitney, Harold A. and 

Consuelo V 

Whittier, Charles F. and 

Ramona Calkins 

Wilber, Harold T. and Inez E 

Wilbor, John S. and Anne F 

Wilbur, Richard P. and 

Charlotte W 

Wildes, Leland A. and Irene E. 

Wiley, G. Arnold and Helen 

Wilfert, Fred J. and Eleanor M. 
Wilfert, Walter A. and 

Eleanor A 

Wilfert, Walter and Fred J 

Wilkie, Earl L. and Virginia A. 

Wilkins, John H. and Aida S 

Wilkshire, Alice E 

Willard, Henry L. and Helen S. 

Williams, Edwin L. Jr 

Williamson, Elizabeth R 

Wilson, John Otis 

Wilson, Melvin S. and 

Eleanor F 

Wilson, Montgomery S. and 

Mary Ann 

Wilson, William A. and 

Eleanor L 

Winchell, Guilbert 225 

Winchell, Guilbert and Evelyn 

Winchell, Guilbert S 

Witham, Arthur B. and 

Margaret F 

Witherton, John R. and 

Elizabeth P 



4,500 


202.50 


10,000 


450.00 


12,500 


562.50 




2.93 



4,600 



207.00 



2,200 


99.00 


4,100 


184.50 


5,500 


247.50 


4,600 


207.00 


6,000 


270.00 


7,750 


348.75 


5,400 


243.00 


200 


9.00 


600 


27.00 


4,500 


202.50 


16,000 


720.00 


100 


4.50 


8,000 


360.00 


3,200 


144.00 


1,300 


58.50 


9,100 


409.50 


4,500 


202.50 


4,750 


213.75 


9,200 


414.00 




10.13 


25,100 


1,129.50 


1,800 


81.00 


3,100 


139.50 


5,800 


261.00 



232 



APPENDIX 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Wood, Frank H. and Jeanne R. 

Wood, James and Lizzie 

Wood, James D. and Ruth E 

Woodland Trust 

Worcester, Alice E. and others... 
Worthington, Thomas K. and 
Elizabeth C ~ 

Young, Charlotte Wales 

Young, David B. and Cora S 

Ziegler, Elmer H. and Hilda M. 



8,200 


369.00 


4,500 


202.50 


4,500 


202.50 


420 


18.90 


2,000 


90.00 



5,250 

3,850 
3,150 

5,100 



236.25 

173.25 
141.75 

229.50 



CEMETERY FUNDS 



233 



Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 







Income 








Funds Deposited in 


A 


ccumulated 


1951 Care 




December 


Middlesex Institution 




in Prior 


Paid in 


1952 


31, 1952 


For Savings 


Principal 


Years 


1952 


Income 


Balance 


Samuel Hartwell 


$300.00 


$25.12 


$5.50 


$8.84 


$328.46 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


74.79 


5.50 


10.21 


379.50 


Annie A. Ray 


300.00 


78.62 


5.50 


10.32 


383.44 


MariaL. Thompson 


500.00 


158.21 


11.50 


17.89 


664.60 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


74.06 


3.50 


15.79 


586.35 


Geo. F.Harrington 


100.00 


6.72 


2.00 ' 


2.89 


107.61 


Francis Flint 


250.00 . 


91.40 


5.00 


9.30 


345.70 


Wm. W.Benjamin 


500.00 


198.60 


6.00 


19.17 


.711.77 


Abijah Jones 


300.00 


13.10 


5.00 


8.52 


316.62 


Ellen F. Whitney 


100.00 


2.90 


2.00 


2.78 


103.68 


E. H. Rogers 


250.00 


18.34 


6.50 


7.24 


269.08 


Ellen T. Trask 


200.00 


101.99 


3.50 


8.26 


306.75 


Thos. Huddleston 


200.00 


8.42 


3.00 


5.67 


211.09 


Joa Pacewicz 


400.00 


36.80 


7.50 


11.87 


441.17 


Mary Susan Rice 


87.27 
300.00 


10.03 
7.54 




2.68 
8.34 


99.98 


Julia A. Bemis 


6.00 


309.88 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


125.08 


6.00 


11.60 


430.68 


ElizabethG.Chapin 


300.00 


64.12 


4.50 


9.95 


369.57 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


10.28 


4.00 


5.70 


211.98 


Agnes S. Brown 


300.00 


22.54 


5.50 


8.78 


325.82 


L. W. Woodworth 


150.00 


5.58 


2.50 


4.22 


157.30 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


11.21 


6.00 


8.45 


313.66 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


12.96 


5.25 


8.51 


316.22 


Mary J. Scripture 


500.00 


15.37 


6.00 


14.09 


523.46 


C. P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


13.80 


4.50 


9.94 


369.24 


HelenO.Storrow 2,000.00 


90.08 


10.00 


57.59 


2,137.67 


Elizabeth Wheeler 


200.00 


13.88 


4.50 


5.78 


215.16 


John H. Wilkins 


675.00 


45.08 


6.50 


19.74 


733.32 


L.B.&A.E.Thiessen 


500.00 
150.00 


12.58 
1.56 




14.17 
4.19 


526.75 


Paul Dorian 


111 


155.75 


Raym.E.Haggerty 
Charles O. Preble 


150.00 


1.56 




4.19 


155.75 


100.00 






2.12 


102.12 


Funds Deposited in 
Suffolk Savings 
Bank 








J. Waldo Smith 


300.00 


17.79 


4.50 


7.92 


321.21 


Edward R. Farrar 


300.00 


9.19 


5.00 


7.71 


311.90 


Charles S. Smith 


300.00 


19.70 


4.00 


7.98 


323.68 


Anne D. Pollard 


300.00 


8.17 


6.00 


7.68 


309.85 



$12,262.27 $1,407.17 $162.75 $370.08 $13,876.77 






234 APPENDIX 



Report of Commissioners of Trust Funds 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952. ... $1,958.55 

Add: Income received in 1952: 

USA bond interest _ $337.50 

Other bond interest 190.75 

Savings bank interest 164.27 

Annuity u/w John H. Pierce 3,000.00 

Rent of property for 1952 ^ 600.00 

Well-Child Clinic charges 5.00 

Dental Clinic charges. 773.25 

$5,070.77 
Less accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 10.84 5,059.93 

Withdrawn from Middlesex Institution 

for Savings - 1,000.00 

Bond interest used to amortize purchase 

premiums 1.75 

$8,020.23 
Deduct: Payments per order of 
Selectmen: 

Hospital aid $2,569.98 

Medicines .... 250.34 

Doctors' bills . 694.00 

Well-Child Clinic . 397.37 

Dental Clinic . -_ ..... 1,486.14 

Care of Park grounds. . 150.00 

$5,547.83 

Savings bank interest allowed to accu- 
mulate 76.35 

Purchase of $1,000 Southern California 

Edison 3% bond due Sept. 1, 1965 1,000.35 6,624.53 

Cash balance at December 31, 1952 $1,395.70 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Cash on hand $1,395.70 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 3,175.58 

Provident Institution for Savings 1,188.42 



TRUST FUNDS 235 

Wakefield Savings Bank 1,923.87 

U.S.A. bonds, at cost: 

$11,00 Series "G" 2 V 2 % due Sept. 1, 1956 11,000.00 

2,500 Series "G" 2%% due Nov. 1, 1959 2,500.00 

8,500 Series "F" due April 1, 1958 6,290.00 

2,000 Series "F" due March 1, 1960 1,480.00 

2,700 Series "F" due Dec. 1, 1960 1,998.00 

3,500 Series "F" due July 1, 1962 2,590.00 

$2,000 Southern Pacific RR Equip. Trust "Q" 

2M% due Oct. 1, 1954 „ 1,981.29 

2,000 St. Louis San Francisco RR Equip. Trust 

"I" 2%% due Aug. 1, 1955 2,004.17 

2,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "CC" 

3% due Sept. 1, 1961 1,995.72 

1,000 Southern California Edison 3% due Sept. 

1, 1965 1,000.00 



$40,522.75 

Note: Redemption value of U.S.A. bonds at Dec. 31, 1952, ex- 
ceeded cost by $537.70. 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952 $45.00 

Income received in 1952: 

U.S.A. Series "G" bonds $30.00 

Savings bank interest 46.58 76.58 



121.58 
Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 46.58 



Cash balance at December 31, 1952 $75,00 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Cash on deposit $75.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,728.61 

$1,200 U.S.A. Series *'G" 2 % % due Jan. 1, 1955 1,200.00 



$3,0o:;.r.l 

Income accumulated to December 31, 1952 $1,778.56 

Principal 1,22 5. Of) 

$3,003.61 






236 APPENDIX 

deCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952 $30.33 

Income received in 1952: 

U.S.A. bond interest . $35*2.32 

Other bond interest . . 152.99 

Savings bank interest . 162.99 

Dividends 56.25 



$724.55 



Less accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 18.85 705.70 



Bond interest credited to Principal to 
Principal to amortize purchase pre- 
miums . . . 4.69 

Withdrawn from savings banks 1,918.00 



$2,658.72 



Net income for 1952, paid to Town of 

Lincoln $705.70 

Bonds purchase :d 

$1,000 Southern California Edison 



3% due 1965 

1,000 American Tel.&Tel. 2%% due 
1975 


1,000.35 
948.30 


2,654.35 


Cash (principal) on hand at December 
31, 1952 




$4.37 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Cash on deposit $4.37 

Cambridge Savings Bank 2,791.52 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,745.53 

$10,000 U.S.A. Series "G" 2V 2 % due April 1, 1958 10,000.00 
1,000 U.S.A. Series "G" 2V 2 % due November 1, 

1959 1,000.00 

1,000 U.S. Treasury 2 % % due March 15, 1970-65 1,015.95 
2,000 U.S. Treasury Registered 2%% due April 

1, 1980-75 2,031.05 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 2%% due 1975 948.30 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip, Trust "CC" 

3% due September 1, 1961 997.86 

1,000 Southern California Edison 3% due 1965 1,000.00 

1,000 Southern Pacific RR Equip. Trust "Q" 

2 1 A% due October 1, 1954 990.65 



TRUST FUNDS 237 

1,000 Western Maryland RR 4% due October 1, 

1969 „ . 1,028.07 

25 shares First National Bank of Boston 1,448.20 

$25,001.50 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Cash Account 

1952 savings bank interest paid to General Funds of 

Town $34.26 

Savings Bank Deposits at December 31, 1952 

Middlesex Institution for Savings $722.00 

Cambridge Savings Bank 495.52 

$1,217,52 

CHARLES SUMNER SMITH SCHOOL AND 
PLAYGROUND FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952 $ .80 

Income received in 1952: 

U.S.A. bond interest $937.50 

Other bond interest 244.26 

Savings bank interest 249.67 

$1,431.43 
Less accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 9.17 1,422.26 

Bond interest credited to book value of 
bonds to amortize purchase pre- 
miums 3.24 

Withdrawn from savings bank 1,268.00 

$2,694.30 

Safe deposit box rent $4.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to ac- 
cumulate 249.67 

Deposited in savings banks 515.00 

Purchase of $2,000 American Tel. & 

Tel. 2%% bonds due 1975 1,894.10 2,662.77 

Cash balance at December 31, 1952 $31.53 



238 APPENDIX 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Cash on deposit $31.53 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank .. „ 2,325.43 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 5,037.53 

Warren Institution for Savings 2,225.37 

U.S.A. bonds (at cost) : 

$25,000 Series "F" due September 1, 1955 18,500.00 

1,000 Series "F" due November 1, 1956 „ 740.00 

6,000 Series "F" due May 1, 1957 4,440.00 

700 Series "F" due October 1, 1957 518.00 

1,200 Series "F" due December 1, 1958 888.00 

9,000 Series "F" due June 1, 1959 „ 6,660.00 

1,000 Series "F" due October 1, 1959 740.00 

1,375 Series "F" due December 1, 1962 1,017.50 

26,500 Series "G" 2V 2 % due October 1, 1954 26,500.00 

11,000 Series "G" 2V 2 % due September 1, 1956 11,000.00 

$3,000 American Tel. & Tel. 2%% due 1975 2,847.01 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "CC" 

3% due September 1, 1961 997.86 

2,000 Great Northern Rwy. Equip. Trust "M" 

2%% due October 1, 1960 2,003.43 

2,000 Southern California Edison 3% due 1965 2,036.50 
2,000 Southern Pacific RR 1st Mortgage 2 1 A% 

due 1961 1,913.27 



$90,421.43 

Note: Redemption value of U.S.A. bonds at December 31, 
1952, was in excess of cost by $4,804.87 

BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952 $570.87 

Income received in 1952: 

U.S.A. bond interest $495.00 

Other bond interest 412.15 

Savings bank interest 13.35 

$920.50 
Less accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased 10.83 909,67 



Bond interest credited to Principal to 

amortize bond purchase premiums .35 

Withdrawn from savings bank 1,012.00 

$2,492.89 



TRUST FUNDS 239 

Payments per order of Trustees: 

January 18 — Mildred Capron $150.00 

February 15 — Hedley Hepworth 200.00 

March 7 — Jack Breed.... ....... 150.00 

November 28 — Nora Wain „ 250.00 

Printing and postage „ _ „... 142.27 

Janitor service at lectures. 13.30 

Expense of maintaining mailing list 3.54 

Safe deposit box rental _ 4.00 

Purchase of $1,000 Southern California 

Edison 3% bond due 1965 „ 1,000.35 1,913.46 



Cash balance at December 31, 1952... $579.43 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Cash on deposit ~ $579.43 

Middlesex Institution for Savings..... „ 28.04 

$11,000 USA Series "G" 2 y 2 % due September 1, 

1956 ~ « .- 11,000.00 

3,000 USA Series "G" 2V 2 % due April 1, 1957 3,000.00 

4,800 USA Series "G" 2 V 2 % due May 1, 1957... 4,800.00 

1,000 USA Series "G" 2 V 2 % due November 1, 

1959 „ ; : 1,000.00 

3,000 Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe General 

4V 2 % 1995 - - „ 3,000.00 

3,00 Louisville Nashville RE, A. K. & C. Div., 

4% due May 1, 1955 3,000.00 

3,000 New England Power Co. 3 x /4% due No- 
vember 15, 1961 3,000.00 

1,000 Southern California Edison 3% due 1965 1,000.00 

2,000 Southern Pacific RR Equip. Trust "Q" 

2^4% due October 1, 1954 1,981.29 



$32,388.76 

Accumulated income $567.43 

Principal „ 31,821.33 



$32,388.76 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952 $54.7! 

Income received in 1952: 

Savings bank interest $6.05 

U.S.A. Series "G" bonds 75.00 



24& APPENDIX 

Other bond interest 59.65 



Less accrued interest paid on bonds 
purchased ~ 

Bond interest credited to Principal to< 
amortize bond premiums. „..„ 

Withdrawn from Middlesex Institution 
for Savings ~ » ~..„...... «, 



140.70 




10.83 


129.81 




.35 




1,000.00? 




$1,184.94 


r 

$26.25 




6.05 




E 

1,000.35 


1,032.65 



Payments per order Trust Fund 
Commissioners : 
July 4 celebration, sound truck and 
badges ». „ 

Savings bank interest allowed to ac- 
cumulate ......= 

Purchase of $1,000 Southern California 
Edison 3% bond due 1965 

Cash on hand at December 31, 1952 $152.29? 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Cash on deposit - .. .. ~ $152.29 

Middlesex Institution for Savings- 224. 6& 

$3,000 U.S.A. Series "G" 2V 2 % due January I, 

19 5 4 - „ 3,0 . 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "C w 

3% due September 1, 1961.. ..- 997.86; 

1,00.0 Southern California Edison 3% due 1965 1,000.00- 



$5,374.84 

Accumulated income at December 31, 1952 $180.09* 

Principal * -._ , 5,194.75 



$5,374.84 

LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1952 ....... $615.03 

Income received in 1952 : 

Julia A. Bemis Fund ....... $19.41 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 1.95 

Codman Fund 12.11 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 3.96 



TRUST FUNDS 



241 



Hattie Hoar Howard Fund. 

David W. Mann Fund 

John H. Pierce Fund .. 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler 

Fund 

General Library Funds 

Withdrawn from Middlesex Institution 
for Savings, David W. Mann Fund 



2.78 
1.91 
28.17 
11.80 
51.39 
32.52 
78.91 

35.06 
5.08 



Expenditures: 

Income from John H. Pierce Fund, 

paid to Edith B. Farrar, Librarian... $28.17 

Per order of Library Trustees : 

Purchase of children's books 81.47 

Purchase of other books 45.40 

"Thoreau's Journal", from Abbie J. 

Stearns Special Fund 21.70 

Consumers Research 3.00 

Electric fan, from David W. Mann 

Fund 35.00 

$214.74 

Safe deposit box rental 4.00 

Savings bank interest income allowed to 

accumulate 105.32 

Cash balance at December 31, 1952 



285.05 



35.00 



$935.08 



324.06 



$611.02 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1952 

Julia A. Bemis Fund: Accumulated 

Income on 
Middlesex Institution for Deposit Principal Total 

Savings $36.61 $684.05 $720.66 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr 

Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 2.53 70.00 72.53 

Codman Fund: 

U.S.A. Series "G" 2 1 , ', 

due June 1, 1955 400.00 400.00 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 3.98 74.59 78.57 



242 APPENDIX 

Accumulated 
Income on 
Deposit Principal Totai' 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings .. „ „ 158.89 158. S& 

Hattie Hoar Howard Fund : 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings ~ .. 3.61 100.00. 103.61 

David W. Mann Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings ~ — _ 2.64 53.16 55.80. 



John H. Pierce Fundr 






U.S.A. Series "G'*2*&% 






due January 1, 19'55»..... 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Middlesex Institution for 






Savings ~...~...~ 


114.57 


114.57: 




1,114.57 


1,114.57' 



George Russell Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings „ 22.24 415.74 437.98 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund : 
U.S.A. Series "G" 2%% 

due January 1, 1955 ~ 1,000.00 1,000.00' 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings - =....- . 49.78 930.00 979.78 



Abbie J. Stearns Special 
Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for 
Savings — ~ 



1,93:0.00 1,979.78. 



George G. Tarbell Fund: 
U.S.A. Series "G" 2V 2 % 

due January 1, 1955 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings ........ - - 7.39 



C. Edgar and Elizabeth 
S. Wheeler Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings _ - ~.~ 66.13 1,235.46 1,301.59 



1,301.03 


1,301.03 


3,000.00 


3,000.00; 


138.38 


145.77 


3,138.38 


3,145.77 



TRUST FUNDS 243 

General Library Funds: 

Boston Five Cents Savings 

Bank 203.00 203.00 



$194.91 $10,878.87 $11,073.78 
Accumulated income cash on 

hand -.. 611.02 611.02 



$805.93 $10,878.87 $11,684.80 



de Cordova and Dana Museum and Park 
Financial Report 

NOTE: This is a report of the funds handled by the Directors of 
the deCordova Museum, and is not a report of the Trus- 
tees under the Will of Julian de Cordova. 



At the beginning of 1952, the I 
During the year 1952, Receipts 
were as follows: 

Income from de Cordova 

Trusts 

Interest on Savings Banks 
Deposits 

Gifts of Associates of the 

Museum 


Mrectors had 
and Expendi 

Received 

$37,990.01 
391.14 

1,756.31 

546.42 

328.95 
132.94 

5,855.10 

2,655.55 

1,012.75 

824.51 

78.50 


on hand $13,043.58 
tures 

Expended 




Contributions of Visitors 

Sale of Property (chiefly 

firewood) 

Museum Services 


„..„ 


Schools, 1952: 

Adults, tuition and costs 

Children, materials fee and 
costs 


5,690.98 

5,165.80 


Tuition for 1953, held for use 
in 1953 


Concert, Film, Lecture, Ad- 
missions and Costs 


629.08 


Collected for Artists, due them 
in 1953 




Salaries and Wages 

Office Expenses, Supplies and 
Maintenance 


15,633.06 
2,380.11 





244 APPENDIX 

Utilities 3,222.80 

Insurance, Taxes and other 

Financial „ 3,386.51 

Caretaker's Cottage - ~... 451.09 

Publicity 1,076.55 

Museum Exhibits and other 

Special Events .*. 1,306.95 

Outdoor Maintenance ...... 403.58 

Cost of Items held For Sale to 

Students and Others 729.30 

Restoration of Painting in 
Collection .. . 

Equipment and Improvements 

Subscriptions and Member- 
ships in Associations ...... ~..~. 



Total of Receipts and 

Expenditures * -..- $51,572.18 

Excess of Receipts, 1952 

Therefore, at the end of 1952, 
the Directors had on hand 



375.00 
2,083.26 

106.20 




.42,640.27 


8,931.91 




$21,975.49 



Jveport 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



C^own of l^incoin 



FOR THE YEAR 1953 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



PRINTED BY 

COLEMAN & COMPANY, INC. 

NATICK. MASSACHUSETTS 

1954 



(contents 



Town Calendar inside cover 

TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Officers and Committees 1 

Selectmen 9 

Town Clerk 14 

Town Meetings 15 

Elections 22 

Licenses 28 

By-Laws Revision 29 

FINANCE 

Auditors 33 

Treasurer 35 

Collector of Taxes 49 

Assessors 50 

Trust Fund Commissioners 141 

Finance Committee Recommendations . . 154 

PROTECTION 

Police Department 52 

Fire Engineers 54 

Inspector of Animals 55 

Tree Warden 55 

Civil Defense Agency 57 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 58 

Nursing Committee 61 

Old Age Assistance and Public Welfare . . 62 

Union Health Department 64 

Regional Planning Board 69 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 65 

Board of Zoning Appeals 70 

Water Commissioners 73 

Superintendent of Streets 76 

Cemetery Commissioners 78 

Inspectors 79 

School Building Committee ...... 79 

School Land Committee 80 

EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Library Trustees . 81 

Bemis Free Lectures ....... 84 

Middlesex County Extension Service . . . 85 

Recreation Committee . 87 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park . . 90 

School Committee 97 

Bicentennial Committee 87 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 113 

Valuation List 117 

Cemetery Funds 141 

Trust Funds . . . . . . . . . . 142 

Fire Calls opposite 152 

WARRANT OF 1954 • . 166 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Elected Town Officers 



Moderator Term Expires 

DONALD P. DONALDSON. „ 1954 

Town Clerk 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS ~ 1954 

Selectmen and Board of Public Welfare 

JOHN O. WILSON, Chairman. . „ 1955 

EDMUND W. GILES..... 1956 

HENRY DeC. WARD _ . 1954 

Assessors 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, Jr., Chairman 1956 

ARTHUR W. RICE 1954 

G. ARNOLD WILEY 1955 

Treasurer 

FREDERICK B. TAYLOR 1954 

Collector of Taxes 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS 1956 

Auditor 

PEARSON HUNT* 1954 

LOUIS C. FARLEY Jr. (Appointed) 1954 

School Committee 

JOHN W. CARMAN, Chairman 1956 

LUCY E. BYGRAVE 1954 

ERNEST P. NEUMANN 1955 

Water Commissioners 

SUMNER SMITH, Chairman 1950 

ROBERT W. SCOTT 195 1 

HENRY WARNER 1955 



2 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Tree Warden Term Expires 
DANIEL A. MacINNIS, Jr „ 1954 

Board of Health 

GORDON A. DONALDSON, Chairman „ „ 1955 

WARREN F. FLINT. „ 1953 

NANCY D. HURD „ 1954 

Cemetery Commissioners 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM, Chairman .... 1956 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON 1954 

JAMES B. BILLINGS 1955 

Planning Board 

ALAN McCLENNEN, Chairman „ 1954 

HOWARD SNELLING „.... 1955 

RICHARD J. EATON * 1956 

ARTHUR T. H WARD 1957 

EVERETT A. BLACK „ 1958 

Measurer of Wood and Bark 

CLIFFORD J. BRADLEY (appointed) 1954 

JOSEPH R. TRACEY .. 1954 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 

CLEMENT C. SAWTELL, Chairman 1955 

LEONARD C. LARRABEE 1954 

WILLIAM De FORD . . 1956 

Trustees of Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures 

CHRISTOPHER W. HURD, Chairman 1955 

MABEL H. TODD , 1956 

LEONARD C. LARRABEE „ „ 1954 

Trustees of Lincoln Library 

ROLAND C. MacKENZIE, Chairman 
GEORGE G. TARBELL 
ALICE G. MERIAM 

JOHN O. WILSON, Chairman Selectmen ex-officio 
JOHN W. CARMAN, Chairman 
School Committee ex-officio 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park 

A. Directors 

CHARLES H. BLAKE 1957 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING..... «- 1954 

JANE K. VANCE „ „ 1955 

JOHN Q. ADAM'S 1956 

B. Directors 

RICHARD S. MERIAM — appointed by Library Trustees 1955 

HELEN WILEY — appointed by School Committee 1956 

ARTHUR E. THIESSEN— appointed by Selectmen , 1954 



Officers and Committees 
Appointed by the Board of Selectmen 

Term Expires 
Clerk of Selectmen and Public Welfare Agent 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER 1954 

Acting Superintendent of Streets 

CLIFFORD H. BRADLEY - „ 1954 

Chief of Police 

LEO J. ALGEO „ „ 1954 

Police Officers 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT 1954 

JAMES J. DIAMOND 1954 

Constables 

LEO J. ALGEO „ 1954 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT - 1954 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 1954 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM 1954 

Dog Officers 

LEO J. ALGEO 1954 

LAWRENCE P. HALLETT 1954 

JAMES J. DIAMOND „ 1954 



4 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
LEO J. ALGEO 1954 

Special Police 

JOHN T. ALGEO FRANCIS T. GILBERT 

BOB BERNSON FRANK GORDON 

ROBERT H. BOOTH HARRY B. KNOWLES 

FLORIY CAMPOBASSO EDWARD D. ROONEY 

JOSEPH CAMPOBASSO SUMNER SMITH 

JOHN COOK FRANCIS J. SMITH 

HENRY J. DAVIS JOSEPH TRACEY 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE HENRY WARNER 

WILLIAM DOHERTY ORRIN C. WOOD 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY JOSEPH COTONI 

DANIEL A. MacINNIS JR. LESLIE M. WILLARD 

DAVID SPOONER CARL SMITH 

JOHN GILBERT HARRY B. KNOWLES 3rd 

Fire Engineers 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1954 

JOSEPH TRACEY - L 1954 

CHARLES K. FITTS* „ 1954 

WILLIAM M. DEAN (Appointed) 1954 

Forest Warden 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1954 

Moth Superintendent 
DANIEL A. MacINNIS JR 1 1954 

Deputy Forest Warden 
JOSEPH TRACEY „ 1954 

Petroleum Inspector 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 1954 

Director of Civil Defense 
EVELETH R. TODD m 1954 

Building Inspector 
WALTER BERGQUIST m 1954 

Plumbing Inspector 
MANNING W. MacRAE (Temporary) 1954 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 5 

Wiring Inspector Term Expires 

WILLIAM DEAN . - 1954 

Board of Appeals 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL, Chairman 1956 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE, Secretary - 1955 

HENRY B. HOOVER...... 1958 

CHARLES K. FITTS* . . - 1957 

THOMAS B. ADAMS - - 1954 

Associate Members 

WILLIAM DEAN 1955 

ELMER H. ZIEGLER - - 1954 

Registrars of Voters 

MANLEY B. BOYCE 1955 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY . 1956 

HENRY J. DAVIS - 1954 

WILLIAM J. DAVIS, Town Clerk ex-officio „.. 1954 

Bureau of Old Age Assistance 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER . 1954 

MARIAN N. OBER „ 1954 

JOHN J. KELLIHER 1954 

Member of District Nursing Committee 

ALBERTA A. FRADD 1954 

Fence Viewers 

GEORGE G. TARBELL 1954 

JOHN J. KELLIHER ! 1954 

Field Drivers 

RODNEY P. COWEN 1954 

LEO J. ALGEO 1954 

Recreation Committee 

ETHAN A. MURPHY (Chairman) 1954 

ASTRID L. DONALDSON „ 1954 

JOHN B. GARRISON 1954 

SADIE J. SHERMAN 1954 

DAVID TODD M 1954 

NORMAN FRADD „ „ 1954 



6 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Surveyor of Cord Wood 
CLIFFORD BRADLEY , „ „ 1954 

Veterans' Agent 
EDMUND W. GILES 1954 

Caretaker of Town Hall 
ORRIN C. WOOD „ „ 1954 



Jury List, 1953 



Name 



Richard B. Ayer 
Theodore C. Baker 
John M. Barnaby 
Walter B. Belanger 
Robert P. Brown 
John J. Connair 
Charles E. Crane 
Gilmore B. Creelman, Jr. 
D. Bradford Davis 
Murray P. Farnsworth 
Anthony Faunce 
Thomas T. Giles 
William L. Grinnell 
Stanley Heck 
Gerard C. Henderson 
Townsend Hornor 
Leonard C. Larrabee 
Edward S. Mullins 
Robert L. Niles 
Elliott F. Page 
Frederic M. Spooner 
Frederick P. Walkey 
John G. Webb 
G. Arnold Wiley 
Guilbert Winchell 



Residence Occupation 

South Great Road Engineer 
Baker Bridge Road Assistant Manager 
Concord Road Coach 

Cambridge Turnpike Engineer 



Page Road 
Lincoln Road 
Weston Road 
South Great Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Lincoln Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
South Great Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Bedford Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Bedford Road 
Weston Road 
Blueberry Lane 
Beaver Pond Road 
Lincoln Road 
South Great Road 
Weston Road 
Lexington Road 
Concord Road 



Architect 

Retired 

IndustrT Real Estate 

Bank Teller 

Printer 

Salesman 

Insurance 

Real Estate 

District Manager 

Purchasing Agent 

Advertising 

Clerk 

Treasurer's Office 

Art Teacher 

Salesman 

Engineer 

Mechanic 

Museum Director 

Banker 

Engineer 

Retired 



Appointment June 22nd, 1953. 



WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



Appointed by the Treasurer 

Assistant Treasurer Term Expires 
M. ELIZABETH CAUSER 1954 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 7 

Appointed by the Board of Health 

Community Nurse Term Expires 
MARIAN N. OBER 1954 

Burial Agent 
WILLIAM H. DAVIS - 1954 

Inspector of Animals 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY „ - 1954 



Appointed by the Moderator 

Finance Committee 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO, Chairman 1954 

THOMAS J. ROUNER, Secretary 1956 

WILLIAM N. PAGE - 1955 

PAUL L. NORTON - 1956 

CHARLES K. FITTS (Appointed) . 1954 

Memorial Day Committee 

AGNES E. LADD 1954 

NORMAN W. FRADD, SR - „ - 1954 

RUTH WARNER „ 1954 

REV. EDWARD J. RONAN. - „ 1954 

METRO FEDOCK 1954 

Building Code Committee 

NORMAN F. BRISSON WILLIAM M. DEAN 

ROBERT BYGRAVE MANNING W. MacRAE 

HENRY B. HOOVER 

Union Health Department 

NANCY D. HURD RICHARD K. CONANT 

JEAN MURPHY ELLIOTT R. HEDGE 

BRADFORD CANNON 

School Building Committee 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL PEARSON HUNT 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE 



8 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Editorial Committee for Town Report 

MARY K. VAN LEER JOSEPH J. O'REILLY 

PEARSON HUNT HENRY F. THOMA 

VICTOR A. LUTNICKI 

200th Anniversary Celebration Committee 

ALICE W. SMITH FREDERICK H. GREEN, Jr. 

WARREN F. FLINT EDITH B. FARRAR 

E. DONLAN ROONEY 

School Land Committee 

JAMES DeNORMANDIE ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING ELLIOTT V. GRABILL 

STANDLEY HECK 



* Resigned. 



Csown Ciovernment 









Report of Board of Selectmen 

Town House Operations 

Any report of Town Government in 1953 must em- 
phasize the expansion of the staff and facilities at the 
Town House. Thanks to favorable action on special 
articles at the Annual and Special Meetings, additional 
office space has been provided and the personnel en- 
larged so that your elected Town officials can better fulfil 
their duties and the citizens can be served more promptly 
and more efficiently. 

There were many candidates of high quality for the 
position of Administrative Assistant to the Selectmen. 
We were very happy that our choice was Mr. Leslie M. 
Willard who started with us on September first and 
moved to Lincoln a few weeks later. Mr. Willard' s back- 
ground includes working for the Boston & Albany R.R. 
and as construction engineer for Stone & Webster before 
entering municipal work in which field he has been Tax 
Assessor in Fitchburg, Public Works Engineer in Fitch- 
burg and in Leominster, Sanitary Engineer at Fort 
Devens and, most recently, Public Works Superinendent 
in Ayer. For some years he has been an instructor at 
Boston University and Northeastern University in Prin- 
ciples of Assessing. Ann Paddock (Mrs. Louis Paddock) 
came with us late in September as full time secretary 
and has proved well able to carry her share of the load 



10 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

with Mrs. Causer and Mr. Willard. We undertook to 
maintain the high standard existing when Mrs. Causer 
was alone in the office and believe that we have at least 
approached that goal. The enthusiasm with which var- 
ious Town departments have sought help from the staff 
evidences the need of this change. 

Road Takings 

Petitions for plans for road takings on Winter Street, 
Weston Road, Page Road, Baker Bridge Road, and Bed- 
ford Lane are with the County Commissioners. It is 
reported that the first two are receiving current atten- 
tion. 

Chapter 90 Construction 

No request for Chapter 90 construction has been filed 
for 1954. The request for Chapter 90 maintenance was 
increased from $3,000 to $4,500. Such funds, provided 
one third each by the Town, County and State, are used 
for maintenance of the nine miles of road built with 
Chapter 90 construction funds in the past. 

Sticke! Case 

The suit against the Town by Frederick Stickel, for the 
settlement of which $1,750 was appropriated in 1953, is 
still unsettled. There is now a possibility that this appro- 
priation may be returned to surplus in the next year or 
two. 

Speed Zoning 

The Police Department reports satisfactory results 
from the speed-zoning signs on Bedford Road and Routes 
117 and 126. Court convictions of speeders are quick and 
easy. As another step in this program it is proposed 
to erect signs on Lincoln Road, Codman Road and Trap- 
elo Road for which authority has already been granted 
by the Department of Public Works and the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles. 



SELECTMEN 11 

Fire Station Site 

During the past two or three years there has been much 
discussion of a site in North Lincoln for a fire station 
to be constructed some time in the future. The Planning 
Board, Fire Engineers and Selectmen are in agreement 
that it is important for the Town to acquire such a 
site before all desirable lots are built upon, and that 
the area on Bedford Road just south of Tracey's Service 
Station is the most desirable location. An article will 
appear in the Warrant for the acquisition of this property 
containing about one-half acre. A lot plan may be seen 
in Mr. Willard's office. 

Garden Club 

For the past few years the Garden Club has patiently 
and regularly added to the beauty of the Town by keep- 
ing the watering trough in front of the Library full of 
flowers, plants and greens. During 1953 the results 
were particularly pleasing. We are happy to give public 
recognition to the Club and its members. 

Civii Defense 

Your attention and thought is directed to the report 
of the Director of Civil Defense. Neither he nor the 
Selectmen nor Finance Committee can with any assur- 
ance recommend a specific appropriation by the Town 
under present conditions, for only future unpredictable 
events can determine what is needed. It is the Select- 
men's hope that the matter may be freely discussd at 
Town Meeting. 

Town Dump 

The study of means of rubbish disposal in continuing, 
including incinerators, open dumps and sanitary fill. The 
possibility of combining some such operation with an 
abutting town has been explored but without providing 



12 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

a solution. Recently questionnaires have been sent to 
all householders to determine how residents are now 
disposing of rubbish so that the problem may be defined 
more closely. 

Town Garage 

The Town Garage, which was built in 1948-49, has been 
a continuing and expensive problem. Due to defects in 
design and or construction, and in spite of minor remed- 
ial steps taken in 1950, large cracks continue to appear 
and to widen between the pilasters and the adjoining 
walls due to the fact there was no interlocking of the 
cinder blocks between the walls and pilasters. Of course 
this movement of the walls has resulted in roof leaks 
as well. To eliminate continued expense for temporary 
repairs, damage due to leaks and to reduce the heating ex- 
pense we recommend that a thorough repair job be clone 
at this time. This involves tying in the walls with the 
pilasters and will cost between §3.000 and $4,000. A 
special article in the Warrant will permit action on this 
matter. 

Budgets 

1954 Budgets for all departments other than schools 
show only a very minor increase in the aggregate over 
1953. The cooperation of all boards and department 
heads in this respect has been noteworthy. 



With the death of Dr. Robert L. DeXormandie on April 
20, 1953, the Town lost one of its most faithful and 
vigorous citizens and public officials. Dr. DeXormandie 
became Chairman of the Board of Health in 1933. a few 
years after establishing his year-round residence here. 
and continued actively in that position with special em- 
phasis on the school health program until his retirement 
in 1951. His enthusiastic support of all good causes in 
Town was best exemplified by his tireless activities as 



SELECTMEN 13 

Chairman of the Advisory Committee to the Selectmen 
on the deCordova and Dana Museum and Park from 
1946 to 1948 and as President of the first Board of 
Directors from 1948 to 1951, since which date he had 
been Honorary President. Dr. DeNormandie's leadership 
and determination during the period of litigation and 
original origination are significant factors in the present 
success of the Museum. 

Respectfully submitted, 
EDMUND W. GILES 
HENRY DeC. WARD 
JOHN 0. WILSON, Chairman 



14 TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Town Clerk's Report 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events 
and activities and issues licenses and certificates. His 
duties include recording the proceedings at Town Meet- 
ings and elections, and notifying the Selectmen and other 
officers concerned of appropriations which have been 
voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept 
at the Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters 
in the Town should communicate with the Clerk. 



Annual Town Meeting 

Monday, March 2, 1953 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donald- 
son at 7 :30 o'clock P.M. The return of the Warrant was 
read, and the Moderator called attention to Article 1. 
(Election of Officers). 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any commit- 
tees, commissioners, trustees, and other officers, re- 
quired by law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Voted: That Clifford H. Bradley and Joseph Tracey 
be elected Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Voted: That the reports of the Town Officers, Com- 
mittees and Trustees as printed in the Town Report be 
accepted and that the reports of the following Com- 
mittees be accepted as interim reports and that the 
Committees and their unexpended appropriations be 
continued: Building Code Committee, Union Health 



TOWN MEETINGS 15 

Committee, to revise the Town By-Laws, School Build- 
ing Committee, Editorial Committee for Town Report 
and 200th Anniversary Celebration Committee. 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of 
the several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any 
of its members and to fix additional compensation of 
such members. 

Voted: That the salaries of the elected Officers of the 
Town for the current year be fixed at the following 
amounts respectively: 

Selectmen each $ 200.00 Assessors, other Members 

Treasurer 200.00 each „ $175.00 

Collector of Taxes 1,800.00 Auditor .. 50.00 

Town Clerk 300.00 Water Commissioners each 75.00 

Assessors (Chairman) 200.00 Tree Warden „ 200.00 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town and enact 
anything in relation to the same. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate under 
Article 5, the seventy seperate appropriations numbered 
one to seventy inclusive for the respective amounts 
recommended for 1953 by the Finance Committee as 
shown by the 1952 Town Report, pages 77 to 84 inclusive, 
except that the following items shall be increased as 
follows : 

Finance Committee 
Item Number Recommendations Increase Final Total 

15 Legal „ „ $1,200.00 $1,700.00 

64 Town Reports 305.15 1,505.15 

34 Brush Removal 500.00 500.00 

and the following shall be decreased as follows : 

Finance Committee 
Item Number Recommendations Decrease Final 

26 Police Car $106.70 $593.30 

making a total of such appropriations for general pur- 
poses of $386,413.75, and further 



16 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $28,- 
475.00 (added to this amount by Mr. Smith's amendment 
the sum of $1,750.00) Final amount $30,225.00 for the 
use of the Water Works, the same to come from the 
Water Works Treasury. Further 

Voted: That is to the following numbered items appro- 
priated as above, the following sums shall be taken from 
the sources respecively designated as follows: Item 43 
Chapter 90 (Highways) $6,500.00 being State and County 
share, to be taken from Free Cash and returned thereto 
when received. Item 54. Equipment, Supplies, and Misc- 
ellaneous (Schools), $705.70 to be taken from deCordova 
School Equipment Fund, and $34.26 from Grammar 
School income. Item 55 Salaries (Library) $685.64 shall 
be taken from the Dog Tax receipts. Item 56. Books 
(Library) $400.00 to be taken from Free Cash and re- 
turned thereto upon receipt of $400.00 from Library 
Trustees per agreement. Item 68. Reserve Fund $6,-000.00 
to be taken from Overlay Surplus. Item 75. Bond Matur- 
ity $30,000.00 to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 
1953, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable 
within one year and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Voted: That the Town Treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1953, and to issue a note or 
notes therefor, payable within one year and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less 
than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, 
General Laws. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct 



TOWN MEETINGS 17 

services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint 
a committee, raise and appropriate money, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Moderator be authorized to appoint 
a committee of five to plan and carry out exercises on 
Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May next and that the 
Town raise and appropriate the sum of $150.00 for the 
use of such Committee in connection with these exercises. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will accept as a public 
way, the private road known as Huntley Lane, as shown 
on a plan recorded with South Middlesex District Regis- 
try of Deeds, Plan book 7820 plan 4 and approved by the 
Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln June 11, 1952. 

Voted: That subject to the receipt of a deed under 
easement in form satisfactory to the Selectmen, the Town 
accept as a public way the private road known as Huntley 
Lane, as shown on a plan recorded with South Middlesex 
Registry of Deeds, Plan book 7820 plan 4 and approved 
by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln June 11, 
1952. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will approve the instal- 
lation of an oil-burner in the present library furnace at 
a cost of approximately five hundred dollars to be paid 
from available trust funds, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: To approve the installation of an oil-burner in 
the present Library furnace at a cost of approximately 
five hundred dollars to be paid from available library 
trust funds. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $406.80 to pay the following 
unpaid 1952 bills. 

Cemetery Department $272.00 

Fire Department 35.89 

School Department 98.91 



18 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $406.80 
to pay the following unpaid 1952 bills: 

Cemetery Department $272.00 

Fire Department 35.89 

School Department 98.91 

the same to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to continue 
the Committee for the 200th Anniversary of the Town 
and appropriate the sum of $2,500 for its use, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Committee for observance of the 
200th Anniversary of the Town be continued with power 
to make and carry out final plans for such observance, 
and that $2,500 be appropriated from Free Cash for the 
use of the Committee. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purchase of a sprayer and 
second hand truck for the use of the Tree Warden, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $3,100.00 for the purchase of a sprayer and second 
hand truck for the use of the Tree Warden. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
the sum of $300.00 for work on the Assessor's Maps, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the sum of $300.00 be appropriated for 
work on the Assessor's Maps. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $4,000.00 for the salary and ex- 
penses of an assistant, to be employed by the Selectmen, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $4,000.00 for the salary and expenses of an assistant 
to be employed by the Board of Selectmen. 



TOWN MEETINGS 19 

Article 15. To see if the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $1,750.00 to be used in settlement of the suit 
against the Town by Frederick Stickel, or to reimburse 
the Water Department for funds paid in settlement of 
said suit, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town appropriate from free cash the 
sum of $1,750.00 to be expended in the discretion of the 
Selectmen in settlement of the suit against the Town 
brought by Frederick Stickel. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will appropriate for 
the use of the School Building Committee, the sum of 
$2,000.00 or such other sum as will complete the addition 
to the New School or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the Town of Lincoln appropriate $9,500.00 
for the use of the School Building Committee to complete 
the addition to the new school, said sum to be taken from 
free cash. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will authorize the 
School Building Committee to take preliminary steps 
toward the acquisition of additional land and ways ad- 
jacent to the New School, appropriate the sum of 
$1,500.00 for expenses, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: That the Town of Lincoln authorize the Mod- 
erator to appoint a committee to take preliminary steps 
toward acquisition of additional land and ways adjacent 
to the New School and appropriate the sum of $750.00 
for their expenses, said sum to be taken from free cash. 



At this time, on Sumner Smith's motion it was voted 
to reconsider Article 5, and further voted to add the sum 
of $1,750.00 to the $28,475.00 making the total of $30,- 
225.00 as recorded under Water Works appropriation 
Pa°re 65. 



20 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a sand 
spreader for the use of the Highway Department or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1,543.50 for the purchase of a sand spreader for the 
use of the Highway Department. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law by striking out sections 2 to 23 in- 
clusive, as amended and substituting therefor the follow- 
ing Sections 2 to 15 inclusive: 

Voted: That the vote of the Town on March 5, 1951 to 
amend the Zoning By-Law be rescinded, and that the 
Zoning By-Law of the Town be amended by striking out 
Sections 2 to 23 inclusive, as amended, and substituting 
therefor the following Sections 2 to 15 inclusive: The 
main motion as printed in the 1952 Town Report, pages 
195 to 203 inclusive, was amended as follows: 

Voted: That the main motion be amended by striking 
out Sections 8 a) and 8 b) and substituting in their 
places the following new sections : 8 a) The height of any 
structure in a single residence district shall exceed 
neither 35 feet nor three stories; 8 b) The height of 
any structure in a general residence or commercial dis- 
trict shall exceed neither 30 feet nor two and one half 
stories. 

(The Planning Board makes these proposals in an effort 
to eliminate what appears to be an uncertainty in the 
phraseology as originally drafted.) 

The above amendments together with the main motion 
were carried unanimously. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 624 of the Acts of 1952, which provides for an 
increase in the annual amounts of certain pensions, re- 






TOWN MEETINGS 21 

tirement allowances, annuities and other benefits payable 
by the Commonwealth and its political subdivisions to 
certain former employees and persons claiming under 
them, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: That the Town vote to accept Chapter 624 of 
the Acts of 1952. 



At this time Mr. John 0. Wilson made a few remarks 
regarding the splendid work done by Mr. Malcolm L. 
Donaldson on the School Committee. Loud and prolonged 
applause was given. 

Meeting adjourned at 10:55 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



22 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Annual Town Election 

March 7, 1953 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant the Mod- 
erator declared the Polls open at 12 o'clock noon, pre- 
viously the Ballot box had been inspected and the follow- 
ing Ballot Clerks duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, Helen M. 
Dougherty, Bertha V. Bowles, Manley B. Boyce, D. 
Everett Sherman Jr., and William 0. Causer, the Polls 
were declared closed at 7 o'clock P.M. with the following 
results. Total number of votes cast 225. 



Town Clerk (one year) 




William H. Davis „ 

Blanks 


222 
3 


Selectman (3 years) 




Edmund W. Giles 

Scattering 


212 
1 


Blanks 


12 


Assessor (three years) 




George G. Tarbell Jr 


201 


Scattering 


1 


Blanks 


23 


Treasurer (one year) 




Frederick B. Taylor 

Scattering 


216 
1 


Blanks 


8 


Collector of Taxes (three years) 




William H. Davis 

Blanks 


224 

1 


Auditor (one year) 




Scattering ~ 


206 

4 


Blanks 


15 



ELECTIONS 23 

School Committee (three years) 

John W. Carman . 208 

Scattering . 2 

Blanks ...... 15 



Water Commissioner (three years) 

Sumner Smith 220 

Blanks - . - » 5 



Board of Health (three years) 

Warren F. Flint 221 

Blanks . „ .. . 4 



Tree Warden (one year) 

Daniel A .Maclnnis Jr - - 219 

Blanks . . 6 

Commissioner of Trust Funds (three years) 

William DeFord . - 2 1 7 

Scattering . 1 

Blanks 7 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for 
Free Public Lectures (three years) 

Mabel H. Todd 222 

Blanks „ 3 

Cemetery Commissioner (three years) 

George E. Cunningham 217 

Blanks „ „ 8 

Planning Board (five years) 

Everett A. Black 212 

Blanks 13 

Director of deCordova Dana Museum (four years) 

Charles H. Blake 220 

Blanks 5 



24 TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Question 



(An Act restricting the use of lands abutting Blanks 13 

the highway known as Route 2 in the Towns YES 81 

of Lincoln and Concord NO 131 



Special Town Meeting 

June 22, 1953 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator at 7:30 o'clock P.M., 
the return of the Warrant was read and the various 
Articles acted upon as follows: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
action taken under Article 12 at the Annual Town Meet- 
ing, March 3, 1952, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the vote under Article 12 at 
the Annual Town Meeting on March 3, 1952 be rescinded 
and that the funds appropriated under said vote be re- 
turned to Surplus. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to acquire by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain or any other way, a parcel 
of land located on Bedford Road, southwest of the inter- 
section of Bedford Road and Route 2, appropriate a sum 
of money therefor or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) To pass over the Article. 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate funds to remodel the lower Town Hall into 
Town Offices and to purchase furniture and equipment 
therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the Town raise the sum of 
$1,400.00 to be expended by the Selectmen for remodeling 
the lower Town Hall into offices and for the original 
furnishings and equipment for the offices, said sum to be 
taken from Free Cash. 



TOWN MEETINGS 25 

Article 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate additional funds for Highways, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $4,000.00 for the Highway Department, 
$2,000.00 to be added to the March 2, 1953 appropriation 
for labor and $2,000.00 to March 2, 1953 appropriation 
for supplies and miscellaneous. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to return to 
surplus the unexpended balance appropriated, under Ar- 
ticle 5, item 45 for Chapter 90 Construction purposes, at 
the Annual Town Meeting, March 3, 1952, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the Town transfer to sur- 
plus the unexpended appropriation for Chapter 9-0 Con- 
struction under Article 5, item 45 at the Annual Town 
Meeting March 3, 1952. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate additional funds for the Planning Board and 
Legal accounts, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the Town raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $300.00 for the Planning Board to be 
added to the March 2, 1953 appropriation for supplies 
and miscellaneous. 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to rescind or 
change the provisions of the vote under Article 9 at the 
Annual Town Meeting on March 2, 1953, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That the Town rescind the vote 
taken under Article 9 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting held on March 2, 1953 ; and that the Town 
appropriate the sum of $1,215.00 for a new heating plant 
in the Library ; and that the Town approve for the same 
purpose the use of an additional $500.00 to be taken from 
available Library Trust Funds; and that the $1,215.00 
be taken from Free Cash. 



26 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
$3,500.00 to renew the pipe from Virginia Road at the 
corner of Old Bedford Road to the Hanlon estate with a 
new 8 inch main, and determine whether the money shall 
be raised by taxation, borrowing, transfer of available 
funds in the treasury, or otherwise, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That $3,500.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated for replacing the pipe from Virginia Road at 
the corner of Bedford Road to the Hanlon estate with a 
new 8 inch main, and to meet said appropriation the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be auth- 
orized to borrow said $3,500.00 for a period of not over 
5 years. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
$2,000.00 to install a chlorinating apparatus in the pump- 
ing station, and determine whether the money shall be 
raised by taxation, borrowing, transfer of available funds 
in the treasury, or otherwise, or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That $500.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated for installing a chlorinating apparatus in the 
pumping station, said sum to be taken from Water Works 
Surplus. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate $6,000.00 for the purchase and installation of 
meters, and determine whether the money shall be raised 
by taxation, borrowing, transfer of available funds in the 
treasury, or otherwise, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Voted: (unanimous) That $6,000.00 be raised and ap- 
propriated for the purchase and installation of meters 
and to meet said appropriation the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow said 
$6,000.00 for a period of not over 5 years. 

Meeting adjourned at 8:35 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk. 



TOWN MEETINGS 27 



Special Town Meeting 

October 5, 1953 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator at 7:30 o'clock P.M. 
The return of the Warrant was read and the following 
action taken. 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to create a 
special unpaid committee to be known as a regional 
school district planning committee, to consist of three 
members, including one member of the school committee, 
to be appointed by the Moderator in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 14 of Chapter 71 of the General 
Laws, as amended; and that there be appropriated for 
the use of said committee the sum of two hundred dollars 
($200.00). 

Voted: That the Town create a special unpaid com- 
mittee to be known as a regional school district planning 
committee, to consist of three members, including one 
member of the school committee, to be appointed by the 
Moderator in accordance with the provisions of Section 
14 of Chapter 71 of the General Laws, as amended ; and 
that there be appropriated for the use of said committee 
the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00). Committee 
appointed: Ernest P. Neumann, Victor L. Lutnicki and 
Malcolm L. Donaldson. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will reconsider the vote 
passed under Article 8 of the Town Meeting of June 22, 
1953, take further action on the subject matter therefor 
and/or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted: (Unanimously) That the vote under Article 8 
of the Special Town Meeting held June 22nd., 1953 be 
rescinded and further 

Voted: (unanimously) That the Town raise and appro- 
priate $3,500.00 to renew the Water Main from Arnold's 



28 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Corner on Virginia Road along Virginia Road and Old 
Bedford Road to the Hanlon Estate, with a new 8 inch 
main a distance of about 1,000 feet, and to meet said 
appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be authorized to borrow said $3,500.00, or 
such part thereof, for a period of not exceeding five years 
as the Water Commissioners shall deem necessary. 

Meeting adjourned at 7:48 P.M. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



Licenses 

Total number of Dog Licenses issued during the year 
1953, 427: namely, 229 Male, 64 Female, 125 Spayed 
Female and 9 Kennel for which the sum of $1,102.60 has 
been paid to the Treasurer. 

Sporting, etc. issued during the year 1953; Fishing 
90, Hunting 51, Sporting 39, Minor Fishing 8, Female 
Fishing 14, Non-resident Fishing 1, Duplicate 3, for 
which the sum of $658.00 has been paid to the Division 
of Fisheries & Game. 

WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Town Clerk 



REVISION OF BY-LAWS 29 



Report of the Committee on the 
Revision of the Town By-Laws 

The By-laws of the Town were adopted — revised — 
March 6, 1933 and approved by the Attorney General of 
the Commonwealth May 16, 1933. Since that time they 
have been amended from time to time in Town Meetings 
so that the 1933 printed edition is now out-of-date. 

Many of the Special Acts of the Legislators which have 
been accepted individually by the Town have subsequent- 
ly been incorporated into the General Laws of the Com- 
monwealth. 

In 1952 the Legislature enacted Chapter 337, which 
was approved May 16, 1952. This Chapter requires the 
Attorney General of the Commonwealth to act upon 
Town By-laws and amendments thereto within 90 days 
after they have been duly submitted to him, and pro- 
vides that if he fails to take action within 90 days they 
may still become effective without another Town Meet- 
ing. 

In reviewing the Town's present By-laws other than 
the Zoning By-law and the Building Code By-law, this 
Committee feels that in order to bring them up-to-date 
and to present them in the best form, they should be 
re- written. 

The Zoning By-law was very carefully considered by 
the Planning Board, and adopted in its present form at 
the Annual Town Meeting in March 1953. 

The Building Code, originally adopted in 1936 and 
amended in 1938, is being carefully considered by a 
special committee. 

This Committee has therefore eliminated these two 
specific By-laws from its consideration. With the excep- 
tion of these two, the Committee recommends that the 
Town repeal all other By-laws, and in their place adopt 
new by-laws which the Committee submits herewith* 
as a part of this report under the caption of "General 



30 TOWN GOVERNMENT 

By-laws", and which we feel will better serve the pur- 
poses of the Town by being up-to-date. 

In addition to these General By-laws, the Committee 
wishes to call attention to the fact that various boards 
and departments have adopted procedural rules and 
regulations which prevail in matters pertaining to their 
respective duties, notably the Board of Water Com- 
missioners, the Board of Health, the Planning Board, 
and the Board of Appeals. 

In addition, on November 13, 1939, the Board of 
Selectmen adopted a Code of Traffic Rules and Regula- 
tions for the Town, which was approved by the Depart- 
ment of Public Works December 12, 1939. Printed copies 
were made available in 1940. 

The Committee feels that it is very important that 
the General By-laws of the Town, the Zoning By-laws, 
and the Building Code, and also such rules and regula- 
tions as may be effectuated by any Town Board or 
Department, or by the Selectmen, be made available in 
printed form for the use and guidance of all Lincoln 
citizens and others who may be affected thereby. 

Following this report is the legislation applicable to 
Lincoln as of January 1, 1954 by virtue of acceptance 
by Town vote. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO 

SUMNER SMITH 

HENRY WARNER, Chairman 

^Printed under Article 20 in the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting. 



REVISION OF BY-LAWS 



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LYiance 



Report of State and Town Auditors 

The work of the State Auditor in 1953 consisted, as 
usual, of a thorough check of the Town's financial records 
for the preceding year, 1952 and the preparation of a 
statement of the Town's financial condition at the be- 
ginning of the year 1953. 

Mr. Pearson Hunt resigned as Town Auditor in 1953 
and Louis C. Farley Jr. was appointed for his unexpired 
term. 

The statutes provide that the "substance" of the State 
Auditor's report be published. In the Town Auditor's 
opinion this substance is contained in the material re- 
produced below, consisting of the Balance Sheet of the 
Town, prepared by the State Auditor. This shows the 
Town's condition at the beginning of 1953. 

LOUIS C. FARLEY JR., Town Auditor 
January 15, 1954 



4 


















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TREASURER 35 



Treasurer's Report, Calendar Year 1953 

January 1, Balance - $206,470.90 

Petty Cash Funds not included in 1952 report. 55.00 



Receipts 

Anti-Rabbies Dog Clinic „ 69.00 

Board of Appeals 55.00 

Board of Health 399.75 

Borrowed in anticipation of taxes - „ 80,000.00 

Cemetery, Digging Graves...... ~ 215.00 

City of Cambridge, Taxes 779.08 

C oil ector of Taxes 299,296.99 

Interest and Costs 327.95 

Concord Court Fines 348.29 

deCordova School Equipment Trust Fund Income 711.25 

deCordova Museum, audit refund 150.00 

Highways, Local „ „ 5.00 

Machinery 475.80 

Inspectors, Building, Plumbing and Wiring. 540.50 

1952 Fees 5.50 

Insurance dividend, refund, etc „ 195.22 

Interest on Deposits... „ 2,298.67 

Library : Fines ~ 279.00 

Transfer from Library Trust Funds 400.00 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

Chapter 90, 1952 Construction $3,327.91 

1953 Maintenance 999.28 

Income Tax 13,855.92 

Corporation Tax 16,445.60 

Highways, Snow Removal f. 162.75 

Licenses 8.00 

Old Age Assistance 18,315.10 

Aid to Disabled 1,886.43 

Aid to Dependent Children 28.96 

a/c Loss of Taxes 569.75 

Meals Tax 818.30 

School Aid, Ch. 70 „ 17,082.45 

School Transportation 16,996.89 

School Construction 25,223.45 

Vocational Education 135.46 115,856.25 

Miscellaneous, Licenses, etc 82.20 



36 FINANCE 

Middlesex County: 

Dog Tax „ 685.64 

Care and Killing of Dogs .. 65.00 

Highways, Chapter 90 Construction 

1952 .. .. 1 , 6 6 3 . 9 f 

Highways, Chapter 90 Maintenance 

1953 - 999.28 3,413.87 

Old Age Assistance Refunds 1,333.56 

Planning Board .. 15.00 

Schools: 

Grammar School Fund Income 53.01 

Teachers' annuities Fund .. 227.06 

Tuition 266.89 

Miscellaneous Receipts .. 66.95 

Town Clerk, Dog Licenses .. 1,102.60 

Town Hall Rentals „ 67.00 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance 13,427.70 

U.S.A. Old Age Assistance Adm - 644.16 

U.S.A. Aid to Disabled - 310.78 

U.S.A. Aid to Disabled Adm 10.83 

U.S.A. Aid to Dependent Children 350.04 

U.S.A. Aid to Dependent Children Adm. 15.24 



$730,321.04 



Payments 

Selectmen's Orders (see detail) $550,137.69 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of: 

State Parks and Reservations 638.40 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 476.27 

Middlesex County: 

1953 Tax - 11,717.88 

Dog Licenses - .. 1,081.40 

Tuberculosis Hospital - 2,623.85 



Total Payments $566,675.49 

Balance in Banks, December 31, 1953 163,540.55 

Petty Cash Funds 105.00 



$730,321.04 



TREASURER 37 






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TREASURER 45 

GENERAL FUND, DECEMBER 31, 1953 

Assets 

Concord National Bank - $35,015.82 

First National Bank of Boston - .. 3,708.82 

Day Trust Company .. 40,778.75 

Arlington Five Cents Savings Bank. „ 4,754.69 

Belmont Savings Bank „ 4,361.54 

Beverly Savings Bank. 4,552.83 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank .. 4,250.97 

Brockton Savings Bank 4,701.82 

Brookline Savings Bank 2,377.38 

Cambridge Savings Bank .. 4,995.72 

Charlestown Savings Bank 5,263.35 

East Bridgewater Savings Bank 4,736.04 

Franklin Savings Bank „ .. 4,825.93 

Home Savings Bank 4,790.26 

Institution for Savings in Roxbury „ „ 4,736.94 

Lowell Institution for Savings 2,307.69 

Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank 4,762.36 

Mai den Savings Bank 2,361.39 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bank > 1,219.70 

Newton Savings Bank. 4,820.00 

North Avenue Savings Bank „ 2,423.72 

Warren Institution for Savings 6,913.21 

Whitman Savings Bank 4,881.62 

Petty Cash Accounts 105.00 



$163,645.55 

Taxes, Interest to be added 14,911.73 

Accounts Receivable: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts @ O.A.A 2,877.73 



T otal Assets $181,435.01 



Liabilities and Surplus 

Dog Licenses, due County 26.60 

Road Machinery Fund .. 1,942.06 

Federal Grants for Public Welfare: 

Old Age Assistance $2,880.28 

Old Age Assistance Administration 57.82 

Aid to Dependent Children 465.35 

Aid to Dependent Children Admin- 
istration „ 19.47 

Aid to Disabled 400.78 

Aid to Disabled Administration 10.85 3,834.55 



46 FINANCE 

Grammar School Fund income 53.01 

deCordova School Equipment Fund 

income 711.25 

Overlay Reserves : 1 9 5 3 „ .. 4,137.92 

1952 „ - 1,171.02 5,308.94 

Unexpended appropriation balances: 

Building Code Committee „ $195.25 

Civil Defense „ 230.44 

Cemetery Improvements „ 422.77 

New School Construction „ „ 318.88 

New School Addition „ 3,146.97 

Removal of Diseased Elm Trees ... 94.50 

Town Report Committee „ 67.40 

Truck and Sprayer for Tree and Moth 

D epar tm ent - .. 177.30 

Preservation of Town Records 150.00 

Revision of Town By-Laws .. 150.00 

Union Health District - 100.00 

200th Anniversary Committee 2,500.00 

Assessors Maps .. 300.00 

New School Land Committee 750.00 

Regional School Committee „ 200.00 8,803.51 

Overlay Surplus - 13,005.89 

General Funds Surplus: 

Receivables reserved until collected $17,789.46 

Available Surplus ("free cash") 129,959.74 147,749.20 

Total Reserves and Surplus 181,435.01 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$150,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $10,000 each Decem- 
ber 1, 1954 - 1968, issued under Chapter 208, Acts of 
1948 

65,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $5,000 each Decem- 
ber 1, 1954 - 1958, and $4,000 each December 1, 1959 - 
1968, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amend- 
ed 

20,000 Highway Equipment Building Loan, l 3 /i%, due $4,000 
each December 1, 1954 - 1958, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws, as amended 
224,000 School Building Loan, 1%%, due $13,000 each Decem- 
ber 1, 1954 - 1961, and $12,000 each December 1, 1962- 
1971, issued under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951 



TREASURER 47 

75,000 School Building- Loan, 1%%, due $5,000 each Decem- 
ber 1, 1954- 1956, and $4,000 each December 1, 1957- 
1971, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amend- 
ed 
6,000 Water Equipment Loan, 2%%, due $2,000 each August 
1, 1954 - 1956, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws, 
as amended 
3,500 Water Main Loan, 2%%, due $1,000 each November 1, 
1954-1956, and $500 due November 1, 1957, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws, as amended 



$543,500 

SCHOOL MILK FUND 



Balance January 1, 1953 ...... ...... 

Receipts „ 


$274.23 
1,978.31 


$2,252.54 


Payments ~. .. 




2,181.97 


December 31, 1953, Balance on Deposit 




$70.57 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Balance, January 1, 1953 .. $100.00 

Payments .. - .. 100.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

January 1, Balance $1,063.02 

Receipts 
Operating : 

Rates, 1952 .. .... 784.08 

Rates, 1951 ... $11.52 

Meter, 1952 34.23 

Rates, 1953 22,448.02 

Meter, 1953 - .. 412.56 

Water Connections .. 2,204.00 

Rent of Hydrants - 3,195.00 

Miscellaneous 393.17 

Stickel settlement returned „ 1,750.00 31,232.58 

$32,295.60 



48 FINANCE 

Expenses 

Salaries „ 10,706.29 

Electricity, Telephone and Fuel Oil .. 3,159.70 

Supplies, equipment, parts and repairs... 6,569.92 

Meters and Maintenance. 5,804.67 

Pitometer Survey 1,577.00 

Equipment Rental 1,269.00 

Miscellaneous .. 480.34 

Chlorinator .. 500.00 

December 31, 1953, Balance on Deposit 



30,066.92 

2,228.68 

$32,295.60 



SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 

Old Bedford Road 

Borrowed per article No. 2 Special Town Meeting 

October 5 , 1 9 53 

Expenditures 



$3,500.00 
2,744.13 



Balance on deposit December 31, 1953. 



Water Meters 

Borrowed per article No. 10 Special Town Meeting 

June 22, 1953 - ,.- 

Expenditures 



$755.87 



$6,000.00 
5,998.74 



Balance on deposit December 31, 1953. 



$1.26 



CEMETERY INVESTMENT ACCOUNT 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1953 „. 

Eeceipts in 1953: 

Proceeds of sale of cemetery lots... 

Interest in savings bank deposit 



$889.00 
182.29 



Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings., 

Balance in Middlesex Institution for Savings at 

January 1 , 195 3 - 

Deposited in 1953 



Balance on deposit at December 31, 1953. 



$186.22 



1,071.29 

$1,257.51 
$1,257.51 



$7,150.99 
1,257.51 

$8,408.50 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



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FINANCE 



Assessors' Report 

The Board of Assessors submit the following report 
for the year 1953: 

All real estate and personal property abatement re- 
quests must be filed by October 1, of the year in question, 
according to law. 



1953 Recapitulation 
Town: 

Total appropriations to be raised by taxation $385,706.65 

Total appropriations to be taken from available 

funds „ 66,857.40 



452,564.05 



State: Tax and Assessments 

Estimate Underestimate 

1. State tax 322.30 44.21 

2. State parks & reservations 638.40 48.63 

Totals 960.70 92.84 

County: 

1. County tax 12,043.77 

2. T.B. Hospital Assessments 2,366.21 

14,409.98 
Overlay of Current year 

Gross amount to be raised 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

1. Income tax 27,457.11 

2. Corporation taxes ~ ~ 16,795.60 

3. Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise... 26,954.77 

4. Old Age Assistance 15,000.00 

5. Schools 12,400.00 

6. Water Department 30,225.00 

7. Interest on Taxes and Assessments 2,300.00 

8. State Assistance for School 

Construction 5,000.00 

9. All others 4,359.65 

140,492.13 



1,053.54 



14,409.98 
7,544.99 



475,572.56 



ASSESSORS 51 

Overestimates of previous year 
(available funds) 

a. County tax - „ 1,923.93 

b. County T.B. Hospital 766.85 

Amount voted from available funds 66,857.40 

69,548.18 
Total Estimated Receipts and Available funds..- 210,040.31 

Net amount to be raised by taxation on polls 

and property „ 265,532.25 

Number of polls 801 @ $2.00 Poll tax 1,602.00 

Total valuation: 

Pers. prop. 419,597 

Real estate 5,078,950 Pers. prop. 20,140.65 

Real estate 243,789.60 

5,498.547 

Total taxes on Polls 

and Prop. 265,532.25 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed 8,391.44 
Number of Dwelling- Houses Assessed 730 

Tax Rate per $1,000 $48.00 

GEORGE G. TARBELL, JR., Chairman 
ARTHUR W. RICE, JR. 
G. ARNOLD WILEY 
Board of Assessors 



Jrroteclion of 
Jrersom ano Jrroperfy 

Report of the Police Department 

I herewith submit my report for the Police Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1953. Said report 
includes all arrests made within the Town of Lincoln 
during the past year. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police 64 

Arrests by State Police 47 

Total number of arrests Ill 

Crimes against the person: 

Assault 2 

Crimes against property: 

Breaking and entering and larceny 3 

Embezzlement 1 

Embezzlement, Accessory before 1 

Crimes against public order: 

Driving a motor vehicle to endanger life 7 

Driving a motor vehicle while intoxicated 12 
Driving a motor vehicle after suspension 

or revocation of license 6 

Drunkeness 17 

Escapee 4 

Giving false name to Police Officer 1 



PROTECTION 53 

Leaving scene of accident after causing 

property damage 1 

Lewd and Lascivious Behavior 4 

Motor Vehicle Laws, Violating 40 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle 4 

Operating unregistered motor vehicle 4 

Refusing to stop for Police Officer 1 

Vagrancy 2 

Violation Town By-Law 1 

Violations of Motor Vehicle Laws reported 

to the Registrar of Motor Vehicles 14 

Motor Vehicle accident report: 

Accidents reported 56 

Occupants injured 43 

Summonses served for other police departments 125 

I wish to extend my thanks to the local telephone 
operators and to the Concord Police Department for their 
help and cooperation throughout the past year. 

I wish also to express the sorrow felt by this depart- 
ment at the passing of our very good friend William G. 
Ryan Chief of the Concord Police Department. Chief 
Ryan gave much unrecorded service and assistance to 
the Town of Lincoln through this department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEO G. ALGEO, Chief of Police 






54 PROTECTION 



Report of Board of Fire Engineers 

During the past year the department answered 93 
alarms as follows: 

Buildings 14 

Brush 48 

Dump 12 

Miscellaneous 19 

Total property losses estimated at $76,324.00, equip- 
ment losses of the department, and additional demand 
in hours necessitated transfers from the reserve fund 
of $461.38 for maintenance and supply account and 
$905.75 for labor at fires account. 

The Board of Engineers has recommended immediate 
approval be given the cost of repairing the present tanks 
located at the South Fire Station. These two tanks, in- 
stalled in 1932, were originally approved to withstand 
250 lbs. operating pressure. Due to corrosion over the 
22 years' span, these tanks have now been restricted 
by the state and underwriters at a pressure not to 
exceed 125 lbs. 

Renovation of this equipment would include changing 
the audible system from a high pressure to a low pres- 
sure one thus assuring many more years of use. It is 
also felt that replacement of the existing open circuit 
transmitter to a closed circuit type is essential to the 
improvement of the alarm system. A closed circuit board 
would allow for expansion to meet the demands of public 
building coverage which may be required by law and 
would also furnish a compatible foundation for inter- 
station transmitting. 

In general, this phase of our operation is at present 
hazardous and obsolete, and for the complete protection 
of the Town, we strongly recommend approval. 

All members of the department wish to extend their 



COMMITTEES 55 

appreciation to the Waltham and Weston Fire Depart- 
ments for the valuable assistance given to Lincoln at the 
DeNormandie fire. 

A. J. DOUGHERTY, Chief 
W. M. DEAN, Clerk 
JOSEPH TRACEY, 

Board of Engineers 



Report of the Inspector of Animals 

The following animals have been inspected: 

Cows, 2 years and older 205 Steers 11 

Heifers, 1 - 2 years ~ 58 Horses - 31 

Heifers, under 1 year....... 73 Sheep 7 

Bulls 5 Swine .. 1,027 

Found the animals to under the rules and regulations 
of the Division of Livestock Disease Control and have 
supplied the Division of Livestock with a list of the 
owners and the number and kind of animals on the 
premises. 

The epidemic among the swine which was prevalent 
one year ago, has been corrected and with new feeding 
regulations, it is felt that this epidemic has been stopped. 

Although twelve dog bites were reported, no bites 
were serious, and all the dogs were placed in quarantine. 

ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 

Inspector of Animals 



Report of Tree Warden 

Spraying this year was started late in April with an 
application of dormant spray on all roadside Elms to 
control the Elm Bark Beetle, which is the carrier of 
Dutch Elm Disease. There was a decline in the total 



56 TREE WARDEN 

number of trees infected this year so this program will 
be followed again next season. 

The next spray was the general foliage spray on all 
roadside trees for control of Gypsy Moth, Elm Leaf 
Beetle and other leaf-eating insects. This was applied 
the latter part of May continuing through the third 
week in June. 

Poison Ivy Control Spraying was done during the hot 
weather of July and August with good results. The final 
spraying was in August on all roadside Elms to control 
the second flight of Elm Leaf Beetle. 

The new hydraulic sprayer with a larger capacity pur- 
chased this year has helped a great deal in the timing 
of the spray applications. 

Roadside brush removal was done on streets with 
heavy growth and shall be continued this year. 

Again this year a survey was made of all Elms visible 
from the road and of Elms of a suspicious nature reported 
by property owners. Samples were taken from a total 
of 54 and sent to the Shade Tree Laboratory at the State 
College. Forty-six were confirmed as having Dutch Elm 
Disease. Of this total 32 were on private property and 
14 on Public ways. 

At the writing of this report these trees are being 
removed at public expense. I urge all Townspeople at 
this time to destroy all dead Elm trees or old Elm logs 
on their property to aid in combating Dutch Elm Disease, 
for these are the breeding places of the Bark Beetles. 

The removal of dead trees and dangerous over-hanging 
limbs was continued as in previous years. 

At this time I once again wish to thank the members 
of the police department for their notification of storm 
damage, and to the members of the Highway Department 
for their cooperation and help. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DANIEL A. MacINNIS, JR. 
Tree Warden 



CIVIL DEFENSE 57 

Civil Defense Agency 

Perhaps one of the biggest problems which faces a 
Civil Defense organization in any surburban community 
is the question of just how great is the need and just 
how much money and effort should be expended. Un- 
fortunately, in making such an evaluation much of the 
thinking must be based on conjecture. There are certain 
things we do know, however, which may serve as guides 
and be helpful in arriving at conclusions, namely: a 
state of emergency still exists ; Lincoln is on the fringes 
of a critical area ; and Civil Defense has already demon- 
strated its usefulness in coping with natural disasters. 
Your Agency has attempted to pursue a middle course 
and establish a reasonable program of preparedness with 
a minimum of expenditure. 

The Lincoln Civil Defense Agency is organized on the 
premise that because of its somewhat limited source of 
manpower and physical equipment its greatest value 
lies in being prepared to receive evacuees from bombed 
out areas and give temporary hospitalization to casual- 
ties in transit who may need intermediate care. Em- 
phasis, therefore, has been placed on establishing facili- 
ties and building up personnel for receiving rather than 
giving support to cities or towns which may experience a 
disaster. 

Chief divisions of the organization as presently con- 
stituted include Civilian War Aid, Medical, Transportation 
and Communication. Under consideration and in the 
preliminary stage of organization is an Auxiliary Police 
Force. Such a group, under the direction of the Chief 
of Police, would be used in the event of an emergeny 
to supplement the regular force. It is anticipated that 
their primary duty would be that of traffic control. 

The director wishes to thank all Agency personnel 
for the time and effort which they are so willingly con- 
tributing. 

EVELETH R. TODD, Director 
Civil Defense Agency 






ULeaLtk ana ( To elf are 



1953 
Report of the Board of Health 

At the initial meeting of the Board in March 1953, 
Mrs. Nancy Hurd was elected Secretary, Mr. Warren 
Flint, member of the Nursing Committee, and Dr. Gordon 
Donaldson, Chairman. Mrs. Marion Ober was appointed 
Agent; Mr. William Davis, burial agent; Mr. Andrew 
Doherty, inspector of animals; and Dr. Alden Russell, 
inspector of slaughtering. Mr. Leslie Willard has proved 
most helpful as a Sanitation officer and advisor in the 
second half of the year in which he was available. 

During the year, the following licenses were granted: 
overnight camps, 1 ; slaughtering of poultry, 1 ; piggeries, 
4 ; convalescent homes, 1 ; homes for the aged, 2 ; sale of 
alcohol, 6; sale of oleomargarine, 5. In the past year, 
the Board of Health, under Chapter 134 of the State 
Laws, has taken on a new licensing job. Before the 
Planning Board can approve any new land subdivision de- 
velopment in Town, the Board of Health must first survey 
and approve the proposed water suppty, sewage disposal 
and water drainage of said development. This Law of 
1952 gives the Board of Health broad powers to control 
building, and a program as it applies to Lincoln has 
been described in a set of "Regulations for Cesspools, 
Septic Tanks, Vault privies, and Drainage." These reg- 



BOARD OF HEALTH 59 

illations are based on State Sanitary engineer recom- 
mendations, and copies are filed at the Town House. 

The year 1953 was a healthy one for Lincoln, as far 
as contagious diseases are concerned. The following 
diseases, as required by State Law, were reported; 
Chicken pox, 27; German measles, 5; Mumps, 1; Per- 
tussis, 1; Tuberculosis, 1. No cases of Poliomylitis oc- 
curred. In spite of recent medical advances, it continues 
to be important that the diagnosis of contagious dis- 
eases be confirmed by a physician, and be reported im- 
mediately by him to the Board. Eleven instances of 
Dog Bite were recorded, and the procedure to be fol- 
lowed in the case of such an event is outlined in the 
Report of this Board in 1951. 

Although over 400 dogs are licensed in the Town, only 
138 were presented at the Dog Clinic on May 2nd 
for innoculation against rabies. The remaining animals 
presumably were innoculated by private veterinarians. 
The clinic this year will be held early in May, and due 
notice will be sent all known dog owners. 

The Well Child Clinic continued to function under the 
able direction of Dr. John Davies. These monthly check- 
up clinics are open to all and a minimum charge is made 
for preventive innoculations of various types. 25 new 
babies were examined, 19 repeaters seen, and 53 pre- 
kindergarten children were checked during the year. 

Dr. David Farrell again served as dentist in the Dental 
Clinic at the New School. Appointments were arranged 
for two days a week during the school term, and in this 
fashion a complete survey of the entire school was 
accomplished. Because of the number of treatments 
i^equested, the Clinic ran through the summer months. 
The general policy of the Lincoln Dental Clinic was 
described in the 1951 Report. 

The Board of Health has continued its interest in the 
use of flourine in drinking water to prevent dental caries. 
There is little doubt that flouridation of water reduces 



60 HEALTH AND WELFARE 

decay in children by 50 to 65 percent. It is endorsed 
by all medical and dental agencies. The amount of 
flourine necessary is 1 part per million of water, and the 
cost averages 5 to 8 cents per capita per annum. Al- 
though the all around safety of flouridation is not yet 
fully established, most opposition appears to stem from 
superstition and prejudice. 

The use of chlorine in town water, voted at Town 
Meeting in June, is unavoidable at present, and results 
from a recent series of unfavorable monthly water culture 
reports. Although chlorine is recommended in all surface 
fed drinking water sources, we feel that recent con- 
tamination of Sandy Pond has resulted from the in- 
creased activities about its shores; and stringent rules 
regarding building and habitation in general should be 
enforced if we are to protect our only water supply 
adequately. 

Through Mrs. Hurd, the Board has maintained con- 
tact with the Union Health study. Progress with sur- 
rounding towns in organizing such a group has been slow, 
and some years may be required to evolve a working 
Union. 

The garbage collection problem has not been solved, 
and the difficulties have not been lessened by a State 
Law (Chapter 655) requiring all garbage fed to com- 
mercial animals be heated to 212 degrees for 15 minutes 
before feeding. At present only 16 percent of house 
holders make use of Mr. Catoni's Garbage collecting 
service, and a town survey is now in progress to de- 
termine a solution to this problem. In the coming year, 
it is hoped that this independent service may be im- 
proved, and be conducted in a more business-like fashion. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GORDON DONALDSON 



NURSING COMMITTEE Gi 



Report of the Nursing Committee 

The rapid increase in the Town's population over the 
last few years has made it necessary for our Community 
Nurse to spend more and more of her time at the schools, 
the Dental Clinic, and the Well Child Conference. Fortun- 
ately the bedside and welfare work have eased con- 
siderably with the result that it has been possible for 
her to cover all the necessary ground. 

Again, this year, the Town has been able to secure 
the services of Miss Bates during Mrs. Ober's vacation. 

1953 Summary 

Number of calls 1,803 

Number of new patients 48 

Number of old patients 22 

Number of patients died 12 

Number of patients moved to hospitals 

or nursing homes 5 

Number of regular patients as of 

12/31/53 13 

Total Fees Collected 1953 

Nursing calls $ 352.25 

Dental Clinic 934.30 

Well Child Conference 31.50 

1,318.05 
Dog Clinic 69.00 

Total $1,387.05 

Respectfully submitted, 
LUCY BYGRAVE 
WARREN FLINT, Chairman 
ALBERTA FRADD, Secretary 



62 HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Report- of the Committee on Old Age 
Assistance and Public Welfare 

At the close of the year 1953 there were thirty-six 
cases receiving Old Age Assistance in the Town of 
Lincoln. During the year seven cases were closed and 
six were added. Although the gross cost of Old Age 
Assistance was approximately the same as in 1952, the 
cost to the Town was considerably less because of a large 
balance in the Federal Grants account on January 1, 1953. 

Following is a summary of expenditures and receipts 
in all categories: 
Old Age Assistance: 

Gross Cost $35,359.83 

Federal Government 13,427.70 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 18,315.10 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Meals 

Tax 818.30 

Other Cities and Towns 1,333.56 

33,894.66 
Cost to the Town of Lincoln 4,345.45 

38,240.11 
Balance in Federal Grants account 

12/31/53 2,880.28 

Reserved for Old Age Assistance $35,359.83 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Gross Cost $ 609.69 

Federal Government : 383.94 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 28.96 

Cost to the Town of Lincoln 580.73 



$ 993..63 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 63 

Balance in Federal Grants account 

12/31/53 „ - 383.94 

Reserved for Aid to Dependent Children $ 609.69 

Aid to Disabled : 

Gross Cost ; ... $ 158.40 

Federal Government 276.88 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1,886.43 

$ 2,163.31 

Cost to Town of Lincoln „„. - — — ■ 

Balance in Federal Grants account 

12/31/53 ......... .......... $ 276.88 

Reserved for Aid to Disabled 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER, 
Public Welfare Agent. 



64 HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Report of the Committee 
To Study Union Health Departments 

The Lincoln Committee, members of the Board of 
Health, and Mrs. Ober have continued to meet with 
similar representatives from the other towns in this 
area mentioned in the 1951 Report. 

On July 1, 1953 the State Legislature revised the 
original bill of 1949, removing the compulsion clause. 

Lincoln's greatest present public health need — which 
would have been met in a union health plan — was for 
the services of a sanitation engineer. Mr. Leslie Willard, 
Assistant to the Town's Selectmen, has been the greatest 
help to the Board of Health in this field. 

The opinion of the representatives in this area is that 
at the present time there is not enough real need nor 
interest in these communities to form a Union Board of 
Health. It is felt, however, that the idea should not be 
completely abandoned for the future. It is recommended 
that the chairmen of the various Boards of Health in 
this area continue to be alive to the problem and keep 
in communication with one another. 

The Lincoln Committee to study Union Health Depart- 
ments recommends that it be discharged, leaving fur- 
ther study of the union plan to the Board of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NANCY D. HURD 
RICHARD K. CONANT 
JEAN M. MURPHY 
BRADFORD CANNON 
ELLIOTT R. HEDGE 



(PL 



anniYiq 
and jruMLc \Koorks 



Report of the Planning Board 

The Planning Board was organized with Howard 
Snelling, Chairman, and Richard J. Eaton, Clerk. Our 
principal activities during the year were concerned with 
sub-division control, matters referred to us in an advisory 
capacity by other Town officers, and consideration of 
future needs of the Town (long-range planning) . 

Sub-divison Control 

The General Court enacted in 1953 a major revision of 
the sub-division law, which imposes additional admini- 
strative duties on ourselves, the Town Clerk and the 
Board of Health. Our present regulations, adopted as 
recently as 1950, require considerable revision. A pre- 
liminary text has been prepared for circulation among 
other Town officers for critical review, final revision and 
publication early in 1954. During the year the following 
sub-divisions were conditionally approved. 

Stratford Realty Company, off Trapelo Road, June 9, 
1953. 

Harold W. Demone, off Cambridge Turnpike, October 
8, 1953. 

Numerous technical details concerning other sub-di- 
visions, previously approved or still pending, were acted 



66 PUBLIC WORKS 

upon or considered. Our Board was frequently consulted 
by land owners in respect to zoning and sub-division 
problems. Improved techniques of sub-division control 
have been developed as a result of cumulative experience 
in this field. 

Advisory Opinions 

Our Board participated in several joint meetings with 
other Town Boards, viz : — the Selectmen, the Board of 
Healthj the Water Commissioners and the Fire Commis- 
sioners, to consider such matters as the Town dump, 
"Chapter 90" road construction, laying-out of existing 
roads, fire station site, and regulations of the Health and 
Water Boards affecting sub-divisions. By request, we 
made formal recommendations in respect to the Town 
dump and the fire station site. 

Long-Range Planning 

Despite a recent doubling of the frequency of our 
meetings, sub-division control and other routine duties 
overshadow our function of long-range planning. The 
basic pattern or "master plan" of Lincoln's physical de- 
velopment was wisely established by a good zoning by- 
law nearly twenty-five years ago whereby 99% of the 
area of the Town was dedicated to single family resi- 
dences on approximately one acre lots. In consequence 
the Town has been largely protected from the ills of 
unplanned commercial and industrial development and 
over-intensive residential construction, such as have been 
suffered by many other suburban communities. This 
basic pattern, still valid, has been subject to constant 
refinement over the intervening years. 

Present studies suggest the possiblity of further im- 
provement. For example, it may well be advisable to 
increase our present minimum lot size (in undeveloped 
single residence districts) to one and a half or two acres, 
thus reducing the number of potential house sites by 
one-third or one-half and minimizing burdensome expan- 



PLANNING BOARD 67 

sion of educational plant, water supply and other Town 
services, to say nothing of public sewage disposal facili- 
ties. Such a proposal, if coupled with a policy of low 
assessments on farms, orchards and wood land, may 
tend to retard the conversion of undeveloped areas into 
suburban house lots. The Town of Wayland has already 
taken steps in this direction and the Town of Weston is 
currently considering them. 

There are those who believe that Lincoln would gain 
much by the introduction of a light-industrial research 
or office district. The benefits to be obtained relate to 
an expanded tax base, development of a broader economic 
and social pattern in the Town, and the absorption of 
areas not well suited to residential development. 

The Board is still uncertain as to both issues and is 
endeavoring through discussion and study to define the 
problems and the various implications. It is unanimous, 
however, in feeling that these matters require continuing 
study by both the townspeople and the Board. 

The subject of protecting the watershed of Sandy 
Pond is attracting increasingly favorable consideration 
and was explored by the Board in more detail during the 
year. There is strong sentiment within the Board that 
ample areas for future recreational facilities should be 
acquired in the north and south ends of Town, while 
there still remains a choice of suitable undeveloped sites. 

Another aspect of the concept of a master plan is the 
future ramification of our road-net. This subject has 
received continuing attention on the part of the Board 
over the years, and is presently a major consideration 
in our dealings with sub-division applicants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HOWARD SNELLING, Chairman 
RICHARD J. EATON, Clerk 
ALAN McCLENNEN 
ARTHUR T. HOWARD 
EVERETT A. BLACK 



68 PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of the Regional Planning Board 

In the fall of 1953 the Lincoln School Committee was 
advised by the towns of Concord and Weston that they 
would be able to accept Lincoln high school students on 
a tuition basis for only a limited time. All their facilities 
would soon be needed to provide for their own high 
school pupils. Lincoln would have to look elsewhere for 
high school instruction. At the recommendation of the 
Lincoln School Committee, a special town meeting was 
called on October 5, and the moderator was instructed 
to appoint a committee to study the problem and to 
recommend a solution. 

It was obvious to the new committee that only two 
courses of action were open, namely to build our own 
high school or to join with a neighboring town to form 
a regional high school district. Upon consulting the 
Massachusetts School Building Assistance Commission, 
the committee was advised that a high school should 
have a minimum of 500 pupils to operate efficiently from 
a financial standpoint and still offer a well rounded 
educational program. The committee, however, has fore- 
cast that even after ten years Lincoln elementary schools 
would be graduating only half that number. Study of the 
experience of other towns the size of Lincoln which have 
attempted to operate small high schools confirmed the 
thinking of the Massachusetts School Building Assistance 
Commission. All of these towns report an extremely 
high cost per pupil. Most of them are now studying the 
prospects of forming a regional district with a neighbor- 
ing town to cut the cost per pupil and to offer a more 
comprehensive program. 

The committee then contacted towns adjacent to 
Lincoln to determine whether there was any interest in 
forming a regional district with Lincoln, or in accepting 
students on a tuition basis. Concord and Weston had 
already given their negative answer. Lexington and 
Waltham showed no interest whatsoever. Bedford was 



PLANNING BOARD 69 

staggering under the load imposed on them by the air- 
port development. Wayland was comfortably situated 
for some years and could not immediately be interested. 
Sudbury, however, was a definite prospect. The town 
has a small high school but is finding the cost per pupil 
high and the educational program limited. 

In early November this committee and a similar com- 
mittee from Sudbury met and formed a Regional District 
School Planning Board. The results of its innumerable 
meetings are reported in a pamphlet being mailed to the 
voters in each town. After much study and after con- 
sultation with the Massachusetts School Building Assist- 
ance Commission, the Board of Selectmen, and the Fin- 
ance Board of Sudbury and Lincoln, this committee 
recommends the building of a regional school to ac- 
commodate 500 pupils. The legal document establishing 
such a regional school district is printed in the pamphlet 
being mailed to you. It has been approved by legal 
council of both towns and the Massachusetts Department 
of Education. You will be given the opportunity to ap- 
prove or disapprove the formation of the regional school 
district by so marking your ballot in the March election. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST P. NEUMANN, Chairman 
VICTOR A. LUTNICKI 
MALCOLM L. DONALDSON 



70 PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of Board of Appeals 

The Board of Appeals has during 1953, as during 1952, 
been required to act on numerous petitions. 

While the Board of Appeals has jurisdiction on various 
matters, in the Town of Lincoln, the primary purpose 
of the Board is to act more or less as a safety valve from 
rigid enforcement of the Zoning By-Law when such 
enforcement would constitute hardship to some indi- 
vidual. The amended Zoning By-Law, adopted by the 
Town Meeting held March 2, 1953, tightened up the pre- 
viously existing Zoning By-Law in accordance with the 
wishes of the Town. 

While the Board attempts to give relief in the occasion- 
al instances in which hardship actually occurs to an 
individual, the Board is careful not to give relief in a 
way which would alter the basic impact of the presently 
existing Zoning By-Law. Thus, the Board of Appeals 
has consistently refused to indulge in spot zoning, to 
take any action Which Would appear to be in any way 
detrimental to the Town, or to take action which would, 
in effect, modify the general application of the presently 
existing By-Law. It is the function of the Planning Board 
to recommend, and the Town Meeting to vote general 
changes in zoning in any area in the Town. It is not 
the function of the Board of Appeals to anticipate such 
action by permitting, for example, a business use in a 
residential area. 

Decisions of the Board of Appeals are enforced by the 
building inspector and, through him, by the Selectmen 
and their agents. The Board itself has no power or 
responsibility to enforce its own acts. 

Set forth below is a summary of the decisions of the 
Board. 

March 24, 1953 

Application of Harold T. Ashworth for a variance 



ZONING APPEALS 71 

to permit the construction of a building 27 feet from 
the line of way, denied. 

Permission granted to Norman Brisson to sell nursery 
products such as bulbs, peat moss, spray materials, fenc- 
ing etc. Permission to sell garden tools or hand or motor 
propelled equipment denied. 

Permission granted to William R. Pearmain for a var- 
iance to permit the construction of a building on land on 
Medina Road. 

May 12, 1953 

Permission granted to Norman Brisson for a temporary 
permit to store landscaping and construction equipment 
in a one story shelter in gravel pit off North Great 
Road. 

Application of Joseph Morrissey to keep dogs in a build- 
ing on Airport Access Road, denied. 

Permission granted for one year only to Mildred 
Bowles to rent ponies on her property subject to the 
approval of the Board of Health and provided that the 
ponies be restricted to her property and not to exceed 
three in number. 

Permission granted to John C. and James J. Canella 
for continuation of an extension of a non-conforming 
use subject to restrictions set forth by the Board of 
Appeals and on file at the office of the Town Clerk. 

May 21, 1953 

Application of James A. Carrig for permission to use 
a building on his property on North Great Road for a 
temporary office, denied. 

June 30, 1953 

Application of Joseph Hurd for a variance to permit 
alterations to a building on Lincoln Road, denied. 



72 PUBLIC WORKS 

Permission granted to St. Anne's Church for a variance 
to allow alterations to the church on Concord Road. 

Permission granted to Walter Barthel and Raytheon 
Mfg. Co. to erect a pole on property on Virginia Road. 

September 21, 1953 

Permission granted to Walter J. Morette for a variance 
to permit construction of a building on land on Virginia 
Road. 

Application of Gill Wyner Co., Inc. for permission to 
remove loam from the property of Joseph Morrissey on 
Airport Road, denied. 

November 16, 1953 

Permission granted to Mary E. Silva for a variance 
to permit the construction of dwellings on two lots of 
land on North Great Road. 

Permission granted to Bob Bernson for a variance to 
permit the construction of a dwelling on land on Weston 
Road. 

Permission granted to Townsend and Barbara Horner 
for a variance to permit the construction of an addition 
to garage on Sandy Pond Road. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL, Chairman 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE, Secretary 
HENRY B. HOOVER 
CHARLES K. FITTS 
THOMAS B. ADAMS 
Board of Appeals 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 73 



Report of Water Commissioners 

Twenty-two meetings were held during the year. 

Subdivisions 

The Permain subdivision on Tabor Hill Road, formerly 
Medina Road, comprising 5 lots, and the Carrig sub- 
division on Morningside Lane and Sunnyside Lane, be- 
tween Bedford Road and Route 2A, comprising 48 lots, 
reecived attention of the Board in the way of conferences, 
inspections and resulting orders to the respective sub- 
dividers. Bonds are on file to protect the Town through 
one winter against defective pipe systems. 

Harold W. Demone laid 600 ft. of 8 inch transite pipe 
at Oak Knoll Road off Route 2, in accordance with 
Water Works regulations. 

Stratford Realty Company, Harold Adler, President, 
commenced installing a water system under Water Board 
regulations, in a subdivision off Trapelo Road, on part 
of the former Pollard Estate. 2,200 feet of 8 inch 
transite pipe, including hydrants, valves, fittings, etc., 
has been laid. 

In order to avoid a useless waste of time, the Board 
invites those planning subdivisions to meet in conference 
before starting. 

Renewal of Main 

In accordance with vote passed under Article 2 of 
Special Town Meeting held October 5, 1953, the Water 
Works borrowed $3,500 to lay 1,088 feet of 8 inch transite 
pipe, with necessary fittings, from Arnold's Corner to 
Hanlon Estate. This replaces two inch pipe. The Water 
Works supplied all but 200 feet of pipe which was pur- 
chased at $1.95 per foot. 10% of the contract price is 
being withheld to protect the Town through Spring 
against defects in installation. 



74 PUBLIC WORKS 

John Gilbert, Water Works Superintendent, inspected 
the installation of all the aforementioned pipe systems. 

Injured Hydrants 

Three hydrants were damaged by automobiles during 
the year and the Water Works collected the cost of 
repairing two. This is the custom when the damager 
is known. In spite of the help of the Police, the owner 
of the third car is yet unidentified. 

Meters 

About one hundred meters remain to be installed. Those 
installed are being read now, and will be read again in 
about six months. The July billing will be based on the 
results of those readings. 

Chlorinating Apparatus 

Water purification equipment was installed in the 
pumping station as directed by the State Department of 
Public Health, and as voted in Special Town Meeting of 
October 5, 1953. 

Pitometer Survey Report 

The scope of work made by the Pitometer Company 
was as follows : 

A test of the pumps for efficiency and a measurement 
of the total consumption. 

A division of the distribution system into two districts 
and a measurement of the flow into these districts over 
a twenty-four hour period. 

Further investigation in both districts for the purpose 
of locating all underground leaks of the mains and 
services. 

The preparation of a map showing Pitometer District 
boundaries and gauging points. 

The preparation of charts showing the variation of 
flow into each district. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 75 

As a result of the Pitometer Water Waste Survey it 
has been definitely proved that underground leakage 
was practically nil in the Lincoln Water System. Con- 
trary to what was expected at the start of the Survey, 
the system was found to be in exceptionally good condi- 
tion in this respect. The Survey did find, however, that 
there were several cases of excessive waste and these 
cases have been noted. As is to be expected in an un- 
metered system a large percentage of the water supplied 
to the system goes to waste. The Town of Lincoln has 
already taken the best method to prevent this waste and 
that is to meter the entire system. 

The results of the Venturi Meter Test showed the 
meter to be in considerable error. This error (28.4% 
Fast) has been the reason for the belief that use, waste 
and leakage in the system were excessive. 

The complete Report is on file at the Selectmen's office. 

Pollution of Water Supply 

A major problem is preventing contamination of the 
waters and shores of Sandy Pond. Patrons of the Dana 
and DeCordova Museum and Park, especially those from 
out of Town, pay no attention to signs erected by the 
Commissioners along the shores of the Museum property. 
This matter has been called to the attention of the 
Musemum Directors, and it is hoped that with their 
cooperation appropriate safety precautions can be made 
effective. 

Budget and Statistics see page 47 



HENRY S. WARNER 
ROBERT W. SCOTT 
SUMNER SMITH, Chairman 



76 PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of the Superintendent of Streets 

The work of your Highway Department is divided into 
the following categories: Snow removal, street mainten- 
ance, street construction, and Chapter 90 maintenance. 

Snow Removal 

The quantity of snow was small in 1953 but the vary- 
ing temperatures created icing conditions. The new sand 
spreader improved substantially the control of these 
conditions. 

Street Maintenance 

This type of work includes painting, cleaning, and 
repairing of street signs, culverts, catch basins, street 
surfaces, guard rails and equipment for 40.8 miles of 
highway. 

1953 Work Completed 

Asphalt and sand surfacing on : Giles Road, Old County 
Road, Hillside Road, Silver Birch Lane, Tower Road, 
Winter Street, and Page Road. 

Repaired drain on Trapelo Road, cleaned catch basins, 
painted guard-rail posts. 

1954 Work Proposed 

Asphalt and sand surfacing on Cedar Road, Huntley 
Lane, Tower Road, Baker Bridge Road, Old Concord Road, 
Sandy Pond Road, Old Winter Street, Silver Hill Road, 
and Conant Road. 

Street Construction 

This type of work includes the building and installa- 
tion of new signs, catch basins, culverts, surfacing and 
widening highways. 



STREETS 77 

1953 Work Completed 

New drain — Giles Road, replaced culvert on Weston 
Road, new catch basin and drain Bedford Road. 

Asphalt and stone surface — Bedford Lane, widen- 
ing" — Silver Hill Road (started), installed 63 Highway 
signs. 

1954 Work Proposed 

Finish widening Silver Hill Road, widen Lincoln and 
Old Sudbury Road south of South Great Road. 

Asphalt and stone surface Bedford Road. 

Resurfacing and drain — Trapelo Road. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Under this account nine miles of our highways are 
maintained with State and County returning 2/3 of the 
cost. 

1953 Work Completed 

Mixed in place — Tower Road to Lincoln Road (So. 
Great Road and Codman Road). 

Asphalt and stone Bedford Road. 

Cut brush on Routes 117 and 126. 

1954 Work Proposed 

Asphalt and stone Concord Road, So. Great Road, and 
Trapelo Road. 

New Equipment 1953 
Sand spreader. 

Proposed 1954 

New truck (trade), new plow (replacement), and 
street sweeper (used). 

Respectfully submitted, 
CLIFFORD BRADLEY, Superintendent 



78 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 
For the Year 1953 

Work of a maintenance nature continued to be the 
principal activity during the year. Numbered stone 
markers were placed on 119 lots, and more will soon 
be needed for areas recently surveyed. No additional 
appropriation is needed for this work now, because of 
an unexpended balance in our permanent improvement 
fund. 

There follows a brief comparison of Lincoln Cemetery 
cost and management experience in 1953 with that of 
seven other Massachusetts towns of comparable size, 
seven other Massachusetts towns of comparable size. 
The tabulation shown was compiled from information 
obtained for us by Mr. Leslie Willard. 



Number acres actively 
maintained 

Maintenance cost (exclud- 
ing permanent improve- 
ments and interment 



Maximum 



40 



7 Towns 
Minimum 



Average 



17.4 



Lincoln 



10 



costs 


$15661. 


$2000. 


$7928. 


$2450. 


Maintenance cost per acre 


$700. 


$200. 


$455. 


$245. 


Price of lots per square 
foot 


$1.70 


.20 


.67 


.50 


Labor cost per hour 


$1.45 


1.10 


1.22 


1.20 



Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E, CUNNINGHAM 
JAMES B. BILLINGS 
R. D. DONALDSON 

Cemetery Commissioners 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 70 

Inspectors of Building, Plumbing 
And Wiring 

Building permits issued during 1953: 

New residential buildings 44 

New non-residential buildings 17 

Alterations and additions 23 

Fees Collected $260.00 

Plumbing permits issued during 1953: 78 

Fees Collected $137.00 

Wiring permits issued during 1953: 100 

Fees collected $143.50 

M. ELIZABETH CAUSER, Clerk 
WALTER BERGQUIST, Building Inspector 
WILLIAM M. DEAN, Wiring Inspector 
MANNING MacRAE, 

Acting Plumbing Inspector 



Report of the School Building Committee 

The School Building Committee reports that the addi- 
tion to the New School is complete. The final work on 
the Gymnasium arches was finished during the recent 
Christmas vacation. Some raking and rolling remains to 
be done on the seeded area behind the school in the 
Spring. The finish surface will also be put on the park- 
ing area at that time. 

The building has been in use for over a year and has 
proved entirely satisfactory. We wish to thank the firm 
of Anderson & Beckwith for their conscientious and 
patient work as architect. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELLIOTT V. GRABILL 
ELIZABETH J. SNELLING 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE 



80 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Report of the Committee to Investigate the 

Need for Additional Land for the 

New School 

The Committee has been studying the land needs of 
the New School, has made surveys of the area involved, 
and investigated probable costs of land as well as possible 
alternatives. The study is not yet complete; therefore 
the Committee will continue its study and report at an 
early Town Meeting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH J. SNELLING 
STANLEY HECK 
ANDREW J. DOUGHERTY 
ELLIOTT V. GRABILL 
JAMES DeNORMANDIE 



OoucaUon 
ana JCecreaUon 



Report of Library Trustees 

Your Library is entering on its seventieth year to 
contribute to the educational and recreational assets of 
the Town. The Trustees and Librarians wish to present 
their report for 1953 and to ask for your support and 
cooperation in the coming year. 

Erected and opened in 1883, there has been no en- 
largement of the building since; so it has been a con- 
tinuing problem of utilizing all available space to its 
maximum to keep pace with the increasing demands of 
our growing Town. About one third of the population 
of the Town use the Library and each of them takes 
home an average of 22 books or periodicals in the year. 
The orderly storage and accessibility of approximately 
16,000 books is necessary. 

The Librarian's reports for several years show a 
steadily increasing use of the library facilities by chil- 
dren. Space devoted to them is small and woefully in- 
adequate, and the need for a Children's room with easily 
accessible storage shelves is apparent and is of much 
concern to the Trustees. They have given it much 
thought and have had conferences with representatives 
of the State Library Board and the State Safety Depart- 
ment to see if basement space made available by the 
change in the heating system offers possibilities. To 



82 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

the casual observer such use seems simple and feasible; 
but there are structural, safety, and administration prob- 
lems to be considered. Expert professional library and 
architectural guidance will be necessary, and necessary 
changes can mean a considerable capital outlay. A start 
has been made and it is hoped the Library eventually 
will have a Children's department sufficient to meet its 
needs. 

Two good friends of the Library, Mrs. Constance 
Taylor and Dr. Robert DeNormandie, died during the 
year. Their interest and cooperation will be much missed. 
In their memory contributions of money and books have 
been made by many friends. Such are greatly appreciated 
and will be used as desired by their families. 

Many other contributions have been made by friends 
of the Library and a list following this report is in 
acknowledgment. Any ommissions are surely uninten- 
tional and are regretted. 

The oil heating system, voted for last year, has been 
installed and is in operation. Its economy has yet to be 
demonstrated, but it already has resulted in a warmer 
and cleaner building. 

The aged cesspool has given much trouble by over- 
flowing, and if present palliative remedial measures do 
not suffice, it may be necessary to install a septic tank. 
Such would require a special appropriation outside of 
the usual library budget. 

1953 expenditures were well under the appropriations; 
1954 estimates are somewhat larger under some headings 
because of increases in the costs of electricity, telephone 
and books. The sum of $500.00 from trust fund earnings 
is available for books this year; this, the accumulation 
from some previous years. 

The Librarian's report follows and we respectfully 
recommend it for your study. ■ •"■ - ■--■".'-""'• : :: ::•■: 



LIBRARY 83 

LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Lincoln, Massachusetts 

These are the names of those who have given books 
or magazines to the library in 1953: 

Concord Book Shop 
Concord Library 
Saint Joseph's Guild 
State Street Trust Co. 

Misses Marion Clark, Olive B. Floyd, Bunny Healey, 
Hazel Newton, Martha Norton, Katherine O'Sullivan, 
Mary Rogers, Evelyn Tuttle, Kay Wilson. 

Messrs. Charles Blake, Charles V. Briggs, Robert 
Chapin, Norman Hapgood, Jr., Ethan Murphy, John 
H. Wilkins. 

Mrs. A. W. Adkins, L. B. Anderson, R. L, DeNormandie, 
R. J. Eaton, R. J. Fairbanks, Richard Fleck, Warren 
Flint, Stanley Heck, Arthur Howard, Richard Mer- 
iam, William Preston, Robert Schlaifer, Robert Scott, 
Sumner Smith, Frank Stewart, F. B. Taylor, Henry 
Warner, Kenneth Webb. 

Memorial books have been given by the Lincoln Garden 
Club and by Mrs. Richard Meriam in memory of 
Mrs. S. Forrest Martin; 

by Miss Elizabeth Wheeler in memory of Mrs. Elizabeth 
Stearns Balliet; 

by Mr. and Mrs. Hurd in memory of Mrs. Lester Monks ; 

by Mrs. Henry S. Bean in memory of Dr. Robert L. 
DeNormandie and of Mr. H. B. Hills ; 

by friends of Mrs. E. S. Taylor in her memory; 

by Mrs. Thiesson in memory of Laurie Thiessen. 



84 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

THE LINCOLN LIBRARY 
Lincoln, Massachusetts 

LIBRARY STATISTICS— 1953 

Number of volumes January 1, 1953 15,846 

Number of volumes added by gift 184 

Number of volumes purchased 466 

Number of volumes withdrawn 827 

Number of volumes December 31, 1953 15,669 

Number of borrowers 837 

Number of days open 149 

Amount of fines collected...... $305.00 

CIRCULATION 

Fiction : 6207 

Non-fiction , 3160 

Juvenile .... 9079 

Periodicals 1063 

Total 19,509 

Library hours are Monday, Wednesday, Saturday from 
three to nine P.M, 



Bern is Free Lectures 

The income and expenses of the Trustees are shown 
in the report of Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

The Trustees have continued the policy of offering as 
wide a variety of lecture subjects as possible. Sugges- 
tions for topics or lectures are always welcomed. 

The Trustees wish to point out again the fact that 
the condition of the piano prevents the offering of 
musical programs. 



EXTENSION SERVICE 85 

An innovation this season has been the wider spacing 
of lecture dates in the winter months due to the crowded 
Town Activity Calendar. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHRISTOPHER W. HURD, Chairman 
MABEL H. TODD 
LEONARD C. LARRABEE 



Report- of the Middlesex County Extension 
Service For Lincoln 

The Middlesex County Extension Service is a publicly 
supported educational institution to serve all the towns 
of the county in agriculture and home economics. In 
agriculture the work is developed county-wide under the 
direction of county councils made up of leading farmers 
in each of the main commodities as vegetables, fruits, 
poultry, dairying, livestock, and commercial flowers. A 
County Bulletin is mailed monthly to all cooperating 
farmers and timely information sent to anyone on re- 
quest. 

4-H Club work is developed under a town committee 
and leaders, and the home economic work is available 
through a town director, organized groups, or direct 
requests. Your town director furnishes counsel to the 
Extension Office on the needs of the towns, services de- 
sired, or leadership needed. 

Information and assistance were made available on 
the planning and operation of a poultry farm or enter- 
prise covering the subjects of poultry housing and equip- 
ment, ventilating and litter management, brooding and 
rearing, marketing, and management for egg production. 



86 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Specialized information on turkey and poultry health 
was made available through the 1953 Middlesex Flock 
Health Program. George Browning participated in the 
1953 Middlesex Flock Health Program. Almon Huff 
served as president of the Middlesex Commercial Rabbit 
Association. 

The Middlesex County Extension Service renders many 
services to the dairymen in this area. There are in the 
county herd testing facilities which include complete herd 
records, pasture, hay and silage production, programs 
which aim at producing more and better roughage at a 
lower cost, and a soil testing laboratory where a com- 
plete analysis can be run to determine needed soil 
nutrients. Also, on application for membership, any 
dairyman has access to one of the best bull studs in the 
northeast for use in his own herd through the artificial 
breeding program. 

Among the very active dairymen in Lincoln are James 
DeNormandie, Hans Van Leer, and Edward Denton. Mr. 
DeNormandie was a member of the County Dairy Ad- 
visory Council. 

Service has also been rendered to the local commercial 
vegetable and fruit growers, this service taking largely 
from the form of farm visits and general information 
on orchard and vegetable pest control through circular 
letters and radio broadcasts. 

Mrs. Medford Huntley had a Clothing Club of seven 
girls. Mr. Medford Huntley had a Garden Club with six 
boys. Mr. Almon Huff had a Rabbit Club with sixteen 
boys. Three girls and five boys attended Camp Middlesex. 
Several boys and girls exhibited at the 4-H County Fair, 
mostly rabbits and sheep. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON 
Town Director 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 87 



Lincoln Recreation Committee 

The Summer Playground carried on a similar program 
to previous years. Activities for both boys and girls 
consisted of basketball, croquet, horseshoe pitching, base- 
ball, tennis, touch football and pingpong under the direc- 
tion of Edward Czarnowski and Dana Murphy. 

With the cooperation of the School Committee we were 
able to present a useful and enjoyable program in handi- 
craft under the supervision of Miss Leona Lawless. 

Full day group trips were taken to Whalom Park and 
Provincetown. 

A "winter sub-committee" has been appointed by the 
chairman to meet with the School Committee to work 
out plans to make use of the gymnasium during after 
school hours. The activities decided on will be made 
known to the Town by use of the Bemis mailing list. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethan Murphy, Chairman Astrid Donaldson 

David Todd Sadie Sherman 

William DeForcl Edward Rooney 

John Garrison Robert Gray 
Malcolm Donaldson 



Bicentennial Committee 

The 200th anniversary of the incorporation of Lincoln 
as a Town will occur on April 23, 1954. In acordance with 
a motion passed at the special Town Meeting in Novem- 
ber, 1952, the Moderator appointed a committee to make 
preliminary plans for suitable observance of the occasion. 
At the annual Town Meeting in March, 1953, this com- 



88 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

mittee was further authorized to proceed with organiza- 
tion and detailed planning for the observance and accom- 
panying celebration. The Town voted an initial appropria- 
tion of $2500 for the 1954 Bicentennial program. 

The committee has adopted a program which it feels 
will provide significant recognition of the Town's growth 
and progress over the past 200 years, and will also fur- 
nish an opportunity for all Lincoln residents to celebrate 
their Town's 200th birthday. The program concentrates 
most of the events into two week ends: April 23-25 and 
July 3-5, 1954. Some continuing projects, such as 
exhibits, will run for longer periods. 

Sunday, April 17 — opening of special exhibit at the 

DeCordova Museum. 
Friday evening, 
April 23 — formal observance with addresses by Mr. 

George Tarbell, Mr. William Rand and Governor 

Herter in the school auditorium, followed by a play 

presented by the Lincoln Players. 
Saturday, April 24 — Arbor Day observance with tree 

planting ceremony. Tour of old houses and Bi- 
centennial Tea. 

Birthday Ball at the auditorium in the evening. 
Sunday, April 25 — anniversary observance by 

churches at morning services. 
Saturday, July 3 — Exhibition tennis matches at the 

Town Field. 

Square Dance in the evening. 

Monday, July 5 — parade and field activities. 
Baseball game, band concert and fireworks. 

Two special publications have been authorized and are 
in preparation. It is intended to make these available 
at cost to residents. Detailed announcement of events 
will be made to the Town well in advance of April 23. 

Several subcommittees have been appointed to plan 
and carry out individual events or projects. A publicity 



BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 89 

subcommittee is organized to provide continuity for the 
central theme of the celebration as well as suitable local 
publicity for the events. A hospitality subcommittee and 
operations group will handle arrangements. 

The committee has felt that the Bicentennial observ- 
ance and celebration should be primarily for the benefit 
of Lincoln residents, their families and friends. Accord- 
ingly, the events have been planned with this policy in 
mind, particularly since the Town does not have the 
facilities to handle large out-of-town crowds attending 
widely-publicized attractions. 

A preliminary budget has been adopted for the celebra- 
tion. This will provide some events of general interest 
free to all Town residents and guests ; others will be pro- 
vided at or below cost to encourage general participation, 
with any deficits paid from the appropriation. A number 
of items require the committee to commit funds in ad- 
vance which will later be recaptured from the sale of 
souvenirs, food, publications and the like. For this 
reason it will be necessary to enter an article in the 
Town Warrant in 1954 requesting an additional appropria- 
tion from the Town, as was stated at the time of the 
original appropriation in 1953. 

The Bicentennial Committee hopes to interest all 
Town organizations in participating in the Bicentennial 
program, and urges officers of all such organizations to 
suggest to this Committee projects consistent with the 
program which would interest their groups. 

Lincoln Bicentennial Committee 

MRS. HERBERT G. FARRAR 

WARREN F. FLINT 

EDMUND W. GILES 

MRS. SUMNER SMITH 

HENRY DeC. WARD 

FREDERICK H. GREENE, Co-Chairman 

JOHN O. WILSON, Co-Chairman 

E. DONLAN ROONEY, Secretary 



90 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



deCordova and Dana Museum and Park 

Report of the Executive Director 
for the year 1953 

This report will picture the previous year's progress 
and activity. The first portion is a general survey and 
specifically covers administration. 

Public awareness of the Museum spread and the yearly 
attendance at exhibitions and classes increased. Probably 
the greatest cause of increased interest was the exhibi- 
tion schedule, designed last year to have special local 
appeal as most of the artists shown were New Eng- 
enders. If we were to name a second reason, it would 
undoubtedly be the very successful Festival of the 
Golden Fleece which was held on the Museum grounds 
in May and drew over 2,000 visitors. 

The Directors, anticipating that there would be an 
increased load on the staff in the fall, especially as the 
Concord Academy art classes would be held at the 
Museum for the first time, authorized the creation of 
the position of Assistant Director. Foster Nystrom of 
Lincoln was chosen for this position. His broad duties 
include assisting with the school, coping with many 
details of administration, and working on publicity and 
publications, for which his experience in commercial art 
made him well qualified. Both Nancy Luxford and Mavis 
Derby resigned and were replaced by Nancy Foell and 
Judith Barry in the positions of Administrative Assistant 
and Registrar, respectively. This meant a complete 
change in administrative staff, which took several months 
of adjustment, but they are now integrated into a 
smoothly functioning unit. The maintenance staff, who 
have been with us since the Museum opened — Karl 
Lahnstein, Floriy Campobasso and Richard Witherton — 
continue to maintain the appearance of the Museum, in 
spite of the greater load, so that it is at all times a 
cause for great pride on our part. 






DE CORDOVA MUSEUM 91 

School 

This season brought the inevitable teaching staff 
changes, with the loss of favorites who have moved to 
other positions or who are pursuing their art careers 
in other parts of the country. But new teachers, added 
to the staff, make friends, and in continuing the estab- 
lished Museum courses bring new enthusiasm with their 
work. 

There is still growth in many directions — in others a 
leveling off. This leveling is the result of either a lack 
of space or a saturation — that is, the demand for a 
specific subject is satisfied and the enrollment is constant. 
The leveling from saturation occurs mainly in adult 
classes, and when this leveling takes place we immediately 
undertake a new area of activity which makes the 
Museum's services open to more people and broadens 
our coverage of the arts. You have, no doubt, seen in 
our bulletins that courses in the dramatic arts have 
been added to the adult schedule. There is no place out- 
side of Boston that such courses are available — and are 
presented here because we think that many people in 
the various "players" groups in the vicinity of Lincoln 
will welcome some professional guidance and inspiration. 

Adult classes showed a considerable increase in number 
of registrations; in the fall of 1952, 146 were enrolled 
and in the same period, 1953, there were 245. 

Enrollment in children's classes in the Fall of 1952 
was 312 and in 1953, 285. This slight drop in attendance 
is accounted for by the fact that three classes were 
dropped from the schedule because of inadequate class- 
room space. However, this enrollment is about all we 
can handle until more space is provided during the time 
children are free for museum classes. This maximum 
attendance has held for two years and can be expected 
to stay at that point at present indications. 

The Museum's widening service to the community 
includes Concord Academy art classes, with an enroll- 



92 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

ment of 130. We think this is a unique opportunity, as 
these girls will receive an art education superior to any 
training possible under even the most ideal situation 
in a big-city high school. Our purpose is not to develop 
artists of each girl but to give every one an understanding 
of the visual world and enjoyment of great art of the 
past and present. They will learn the language of vision. 

Exhibitions 

In line with our program of presenting to you New 
England artists, known or unknown, who in our opinion 
are making definite artistic contributions, we presented 
twenty-one artists in solo or duo shows. Outstanding, 
in retrospect, were the Andersons' weaving, enamels 
and silver of the Israels, and the paintings of Alcalay 
and Kepes. Two nationally known artists were Steven 
Greene, remembered for monumental figure compositions 
and religious paintings, and Elie Nadelman, whose painted 
wood figures aroused considerable local interest. The 
Museum's first adventure into the field of architecture 
was an exhibition of the work of Carl Koch. 

In 1953 the deCordova undertook the assembling and 
presentation of the second annual Massachusetts Crafts 
exhibition. This show, held in the Spring, drew large 
audiences from all over the state and served to introduce 
our galleries to many people who had not previously 
visited the Museum. 

A popular exhibition at the year's end was the New 
England Water-color Competition, which drew entries 
from all of New England and re-emphasized the Museum's 
position of promoting the best regional art of our time. 

Based on the most accurate estimate possible, with 
only Sunday attendance tallied, over 20,000 visitors came 
to the exhibitions this year. 

Special Events 

There were several organizations in Lincoln which used 
the Museum and auditorium this year because its facili- 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM 93 

ties most perfectly fulfilled their needs. They were the 
Community Fund Committee, the Lincoln Players and 
the Lincoln Garden Club which again held its annual 
Spring Flower Show at the Museum. 

Five concerts were held last season. They were varied, 
including two pianists, a violin and piano duo, the Morn- 
ing Chorale, and a special chamber music concert for 
the children by the LaSalle Quartet. 

Local craftsmen felt that there was a need for an 
organization to serve the interest of craft artisans in 
Greater Boston, and in cooperation with the deCordova 
Museum have formed a group to be known as the 
deCordova Craftsmen. One meeting has already been 
held at the Museum with a guest speaker. The member- 
ship brochure states that the organization's purpose is 
" — to encourage originality and individuality in craft 
designs". The Directors encouraged formation of this 
group as another way the Museum could reach out to 
serve the artist and public. 

As always, volunteers aided the Museum, and without 
their considerable assistance the enlarged bulletin, which 
you receive four times a year, could not be undertaken. 

Associates 

We welcome the 34 new associates who joined during 
the past year, which brings the total to 276. This is your 
Museum and needs your active support. 

I wish to thank the Board of Directors for their sup- 
port and cooperation, for without their active participa- 
tion this program would not be possible. 

Each year we extend or withdraw our limits, keeping 
our program flexible and dynamic, to serve the arts and 
the community as fully as our staff and facilities permit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERICK P. VVALKE Y, 

Executive Director. 



94 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



deCordova and Dona Museum and Park 

Report of the Directors 
for the year 1953 

The deCordova Museum was opened to the public in 
the autumn of 1950. There was on exhibition at that 
time, oil paintings and prints by American artists, for 
it has been the policy of the Museum to concentrate on 
the American scene, with emphasis on regional arts and 
crafts. Attendance during that autumn averaged two 
hundred on a Sunday, the Museum's big day. At the 
same time, a school in arts and crafts was opened at the 
Museum with classes for children and adults. Total en- 
rollment was about two hundred. 

The interval of time since then has been one of 
growth, and during the autumn just past the average 
attendance on good Sundays was between four and five 
hundred, and sometimes better. The total enrollment in 
the school at the same time was close to seven hundred 
persons. 

At present the Museum is extended to its absolute 
physical limits to house the school, with no room for 
expansion within its existing shell. There is a good deal 
of outside pressure for the Museum to expand its teach- 
ing program further into the craft field, and embrace 
such subjects as ceramics, weaving, and wood carving. 
The Directors believe that this is an important part of 
the services which the Museum should be able to render 
to the community, but to do this requires a building 
program for added classroom space. 

The Museum must rely, for its operation upon the 
deCordova trust funds, and such income as is derived 
from tuition and associate fees. The budget is very tight, 
and the end of each year finds us with almost nothing 
left over. Therefore, we must look elsewhere for funds 
to complete much needed classroom space. How these are 






DE CORDOVA MUSEUM 95 

to be achieved is not yet apparent, but with ingenuity 
the Directors believe that ways can and will be found. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN Q. ADAMS, President 
CHARLES H. BLAKE, Vice-President 
ARTHUR E. THIESSEN, Treasurer 
ELIZABETH SNELLING, Clerk 
RICHARD S. MERIAM 
HELEN WILEY 
JANE K. VANCE 



SckooL (yommitt 



ee 



Jveport 



to the 



Csown of bLncoLn 




For the School Year 1952-1953 



98 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



School Calendar 1954-1955 

September 6 — Monday...... „ Labor Day 

8-10 — Wednesday-Friday....Staff Organization and 

Workshop 
1 3 — Monday School Opens 

October 12 — Tuesday „ Columbus Day Recess 

November 9 — Tuesday Annual Open House 

11 — Thursday -..Armistice Day Recess 

25—2 6 — Thursday-Friday Thanksgiving Recess 

December 22 — Wednesday .. Christmas Vacation, Closing 

January 3 — Monday School Resumes 

February 18 — Friday. -..Winter Vacation, Closing 

28 — Monday School Resumes 

March 25 — Friday Teachers' Visiting Day 

April 15 — Friday Spring Vacation, Closing 

25 — Monday School Resumes 

May 30 — Monday Memorial Day 

June 17 — Friday -.Summer Vacation, Closing 

20 — Monday...... Commencement 

20-24 — Monday-Friday Staff Organization and 

Workshop 



ADDITIONAL CALENDAR DATA 

It is planned to continue the policy of no school on 
Wednesdays for the first grade until the Christmas 
vacation. 

Kindergarten morning and afternoon sessions will re= 
verse on January 31, 1955. 

Staff Meeting Half-Days will be the second Wednesday 
of each month except September, December, and June. 






SCHOOL COMMITTEE 99 



Organization 

Term 
Expires 

JOHN W. CARMAN, Chairman . 1956 

(MRS.) LUCY E. BYGRAVE 1954 

ERNEST P. NEUMANN „ .. 1955 

MEETINGS: Regular First Tuesday of each month: 7:30 p.m. 
at the Superintendent's office. LI 6-0333. 

Called: Third Tuesday of each month usually 
and other meetings as stated; time and 
place designated. 

Superintendent of Schools 

DOUGLAS B. ROBERTS, Concord Road, LI 6-0360-J 
Office at New Elementary School, LI 6-0333 

Secretary to Superintendent 
SOLVAY G. VALENTINE 

Building Principals 
ROBERT B. PATCH 

New Elementary School, LI 6-0333 

LOUIS J. SAPIENZA 
Center School, LI 6-0462 

Clerk — Center School 
(MRS.) EDITH W. HARVEY 

Custodians 
HAROLD V. SHERIDAN, New Elementary 
ROBERT J. HARTEL, Center 

Office Hours 

School Days — 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
School Vacation — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



100 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

No-School Signals 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system: 
7:10 a.m. 3-3-3 repeated at 

7:15 a.m. 3-3-3 

Radio station announcements will be read between the 
period of 6:30 and 7:30 A.M. On stormy mornings, if 
convenient, tune in on two or more stations since it is 
not always possible to get messages through to several 
stations in the brief time allotted us. Plea.se refrain, too, 
from tying up local phone lines to school officials and 
bus operators during the morning hour, 6:30-7:30. We 
try to contact all of the following when it is necessary 
to announce "No School" : 

WBZ „ - 1030K WHDH 850K 

WEEI 590K WNAC - - „ 680K 

If an announcement is read, "No School — All Schools" 
it will mean that no buses will operate and high school 
pupils will govern themselves accordingly. Announce- 
ments referring to Lincoln and merely stating "No 
School" will apply to elementary pupils only. 

During extremely stormy or cold weather, parents are 
urged to exercise their own judgment in sending the 
younger children. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 101 



Report of the School Committee 

To the Town of Lincoln: 

The annual report of the School Committee for 1953 
covers four (4) categories — enrollment, personnel, 
building facilities and budget planning. 

The anticipated rate of increase in school enrollment 
has continued with a current school population, Kinder- 
garten through grade VIII, of 492, an increase in one 
year of 36 pupils. Arrangements have been completed to 
provide for our high school pupils for the next two years 
pending town action in March on the proposed Regional 
High School District, or the development of some other 
provision for our high school students. 

In June, the School Committee accepted the resigna- 
tion of Mr. Andrew J. Manges, Superintendent of Schools 
for five years, and after extensive investigation appointed 
Mr. Douglass B. Roberts to that position. More than the 
usual turnover among the teaching staff took place 
during 1953, but due to careful selection, it is our opinion 
that substantial improvement was the end result. Con- 
tinuing salary study aimed at maintaining Lincoln's posi- 
tion in this area resulted in an upward revision which 
provides a minimum salary for a teacher with a degree 
of $3000 per year. 

In February, the newly completed classroom-gymnas- 
ium addition was occupied, making possible a broadening 
of the school program. However, as has been the case 
in the past, new facilities barely keep pace with enroll- 
ment increases. These increases have made desirable 
a further division of classes and the use of both class- 
rooms in South School starting in September 1954. Fur- 
ther, in order to keep up with projected increases, it is 
the Committee's recommendation that a Building Com- 
mittee be appointed to develop plans and costs for a class- 
room consisting of an estimated six rooms. 



102 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

In 1953 the School Department operated at a cost of 
$21,000 less than the budget voted last March. This 
budget contemplated the employment of an additional 
teacher in January 1953. Competent personnel was not 
available. In addition, a third janitor included for the 
full year was not employed, and it was decided on a trial 
basis to give up a staff member devoted to remedial and 
testing work for a year. The balance of the unexpended 
funds can be attributed to changes in administration and 
staff and to lower than estimated operating expenses for 
the additional building. It is our opinion that the educa- 
tional standards did not suffer and under these conditions 
the School Committee is pleased to return substantial 
budget funds. 

The 1954 budget recommendation represents an in- 
crease of 16% over the expenditures for 1953, and pro- 
vides for three additional classroom teachers and the 
reinstatement on the staff of a teacher devoting full 
time to remedial and testing work. In addition, funds 
sufficient to conduct the desired educational activities, 
transportation, tuition, plant operation and maintenance 
are included. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. CARMAN, Chairman 
MRS. LUCY E. BYGRAVE 
ERNEST P. NEUMANN 

Lincoln School Committee 



Report of the Superintendent* of Schools 

The year 1953 has seen change and growth in the 
Lincoln School system dictated by ever increasing de- 
mands upon education. It is important to understand 
that such change and growth has occurred without sacri- 
fice of basic principles and objectives. The Linoln School 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 103 

system seeks to produce an alert, gathered, and well 
disciplined child capable of achieving significant progress 
at the secondary level. 

Your superintendent assumed his duties in August. 
The staff has used the first part of this school year to 
re-examine some of the policies under which the schools 
have been operating. Emphasis is being placed on reason- 
able standards of behavior and achievement and modifica- 
tions have been made in the method of reporting progress 
to parents. In this respect a plan has been instituted 
whereby kindergarten progress is reported in semi- 
annual conferences as well as in home visits which have 
been continued from previous years; in grade 1 to 5 
reports are being made by conference in November and 
April, supplemented by written reports in January and 
June; for the 6th, 7th, and 8th grades, in which the 
pupil's work is completely departmentalized, a written 
report is issued four times during the school year with 
conferences scheduled as needed or desired by either 
teachers or parents. An attempt has been made by the 
staff to include in the written reports more of the in- 
formation which parents seem to desire. 

The curriculum of the elementary school is almost 
wholly concerned with those aspects of learning which 
should be common to all people. Your schools are under- 
going a constant re-evaluation in regard to curriculum 
which has as its ultimate purpose the production of 
youth who are competent in the tools and skills of com- 
munication, number sense, computations, and human 
inter-relationships; who possess the basic knowledge of 
the physical sciences, political sciences, social sciences, 
geographical sciences, economic, and home and family 
arts that characterize the educated person; who will 
have developed cultural knowledge, appreciation, enjoy- 
ment and some skill in the use of line, form, color, litera- 
ture, music, history, and manipulative crafts ; who under- 
stand the principles of health and have made normal 
physical development; and who will be equipped to meet 
life in a complex society with developing maturity. 



104 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

In order to achieve the ends stated above a general 
tightening up of our requirements of the pupils has been 
instituted. We are insisting that pupils meet reasonable 
standards of achievement and at the same time temper- 
ing our judgment of what is reasonable with our knowl- 
edge of each individual's abilities and needs. This is 
particularly true of the "basic" subjects. In the "cultural" 
areas of music, art, literature, and manipulative crafts 
the emphasis is placed not so much on performance as 
on the development of broad knowledge, appreciation, and 
enjoyment. Beginning at what ever level of development 
we found ourselves in each area, progress has been made 
in every area toward our stated goals. In the fields of 
art and literature under the leadership of capable teachers 
who have been in the Lincoln Schools for several years 
thus giving continuity to the program, we are probably 
nearest to the realization of our aims. The music and 
manipulative crafts programs are staffed with newcomers 
to Lincoln which has given them new direction. Both 
show good promise of developing in a few years into 
fine programs. The physical education program has a 
"new look" with a program of gym classes, intramural 
games, and team sports designed to produce healthy 
bodies and good health habits. Throughout the whole 
continuing effort is being made to coordinate the many 
parts of the curriculum and to supplement one with 
another. We may point to the Annual Operetta, Spring 
Program and Fall Open House as examples of the correla- 
tion of areas such as Music, Literature, English, History, 
Art, Physical Education and Shop. 

The testing program for placement and evaluation is 
continuing with some modifications from past procedures. 
In the Fall, twenty-nine pupils new to Lincoln were tested 
for achievement and general academic ability and placed 
accordmgh/. The entire school was tested for achieve- 
ment in April with the following results : 

a) Compared with national standards our pupils 
showed a range in achievement from minus two 
months to plus seven months, with the whole 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 105 

school at three months above average. The one 
grade below average is receiving special attention 
this year. 

b) Seventy pupils were found to be accelerated one 
year or more in general achievement while only 
twenty-seven were retarded one or more years. 

c) In reading which is basic to most learning one 
hundred forty-four or 40% of the whole student 
body were accelerated while thirty-five or 9% 
were retarded. 

Fifteen pupils from grades 3, 5, and 6 received extra 
help in reading during the spring and showed an average 
gain of 1 year and 3 months over their achievement of 
the previous year. Seven pupils of grade 4 were given 
extra help for a short time after their transfer from 
South School. Their gain was outstanding due to a var- 
iety of reasons and they would have received continued 
specific help of this nature had not the developmental 
reading program been eliminated experimentally for this 
school year. On the basis of experience we propose to 
reinstitute the remedial work as soon as practicable. It 
is also planned to continue the achievement testing this 
April including a series of tests in the social sciences and 
to retest next October for diagnostic purposes. 

Changes in housing occurred also. South School was 

temporarily closed in February when the new addition 
to the New School with the gymnasium-auditorium was 
opened. Presently eight rooms are being used at Center 
School for grades 1 to 3, while two kindergartens and ten 
sections of grades 4 to 8 are being housed at the New 
School. It appears that it will be necessary to reopen 
South School in September and to use at least one of the 
special rooms for our growing enrollment which is 
estimated at 535 for kindegarten and grades 1-8 in 
October, 1954, as compared to 491 in October, 1953. 

Many other aspects of the total school situation are 
also concerning parts or all of the staff. Mention may be 



106 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

made of the participation on the part of the teachers in 
the program of the Lincoln School Association, the de- 
velopment of a sound budget, the planning for meeting 
the needs of our high school youth, development of a 
club program in grades 6, 7, and 8, improvement in 
quantity and quality of assembly programs, planning for 
better meeting the needs of pupils of varying abilities 
in each classroom, publication of a seventh grade school 
newspaper, and such annual events as the Science Fair, 
Operetta, May Day Festival, Open House, and Christmas 
program. 

I am happy to have the opportunity to express my 
sincere appreciation of the wholehearted cooperation 
given me by the staff, the school committee, and the 
townspeople both individually and through the Lincoln 
School Association in our common efforts to give the 
children of Lincoln the best possible education. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DOUGLASS B. ROBERTS, 

Superintendent of Schools 

January 11, 1954 



School Nurse's Report 



To the School Committee: \ 

A report of school nursing for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1953, is hereby submitted. 

Schools have been visited daily. There have been 31 5H 
office calls for treatment or advice, 32 pupils taken home, ^ 
6 pupils .excluded from school^ and 218 home calls to 
check on absentees. .: ::t : •:./..' ..:.: :~ 

All pupils have been weighed and measured twice, and 
scalps examined frequently. :;.:;: \: :.';■_ ;.:;.v 

Children entering • kindergarten^ and others new to 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 107 

first grade were requested to have a physical examina- 
tion. 

There were 53 children who attended our Well Child 
Conference, who were given physical examinations by 
Dr. John A. V. Davies. There were 28 children who 
received Triple Antigen, 18 were vaccinated and 18 re- 
ceived a Booster shot. Four parents came for a physical 
record card and had their child visit the family physician. 

I assisted Dr. Randolph Piper with physical examina- 
tions in grades I, III, IV and VII during May. Few very 
minor defects were discovered and have been corrected 
or are under observation. 

I assisted Dr. David Farrell at dental clinic two half 
days each week, and the oral condition of our pupils is 
showing an improvement. 

Dr. Farrell visited three classrooms showing pictures 
and giving a talk on oral care. 

Five pupils were taken to Middlesex Sanatorium for 
Chest X-Ray and all new teachers visited the Sanatorium 
for X-Rays. Results in all cases were negative. 

During April and May, the State Department of Child 
Welfare provided an Audiometer and Massachusetts 
Vision Chart and all pupils were examined. Four pupils 
were found with defective sight. Three are now wearing 
glasses and the other is taking exercises and is under 
observation. Six pupils were found with defective hear- 
ing. All have visited their family physician. 

The Audiometer tests were repeated during November 
and December. Only three pupils showed signs of some 
hearing defects. Steps have been taken to correct these. 

The general health of our pupils has been very good. 
Contagious diseases consisted of: Chicken Pox 27; Mumps 
1 ; Ringworm 2 ; German Measles 5 ; Impetigo 3 ; Pertussis 
1. 

Numerous classroom talks with teachers and pupils 
were held during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN N. OBER, R.N., School Nurse. 



108 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



A. 



B. 



SCHOOL 


CENSUS 




Distribution of Minors 






by Age and Sex 


5 yrs. or over 


7 yrs. and 


October 1, 1952 


and under 7 


under 16 


1. Boys - 


74 


226 


2. Girls 


78 


221 


Totals 


152 


447 


Distribution: Location 






1. In public Day School.... 


135 


391 


2. In Private Schools 


13 


56 


3. Not enrolled in schools 4 


56 



Totals 152 447 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL ENROLLEES 
October I, 1953 

1. Newton Trade School 3 

2. Newton Part Time Cooperative High School 1 

3. Newton Evening Trade School ~ 1 

4. Boston Evening Trade School 1 



Total 6 

TUITION PUPILS ATTENDING SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Outside of Lincoln 

October I, 1953 

School 9 10 11 12 Totals 

Concord - 16 12 20 17 65 

Weston 9 11 5 4 29 

Other 111 3 

25 24 26 22 97 



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110 EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

PER PUPIL COSTS— 1953 

1. Population of Town „ ... .. 2,427.00 

2. Average School Membership 565.00 

3. Equalized Valuation, per Pupil $9,585.00 

4. Expenditures for Schools 174,224.03 

5. Receipts Accredited to School .. 34,256.41* 

6. Net Expenditures from Local Taxation 139,967.62* 

7. Expenditures per Pupil .. 308.36 

8. Per Pupil Net Expenditures from Local 

Taxation 247.73* 

9. Receipts per Pupil 60.63* 

10. Transportation: Elementary High School Total 

Number of pupils 28,824.8 46,776.7 

Number of pupils 473 92 565 

Mileage 17,951.9 28,824.8 46,776.7 

Expenditures $8,745.62 $13,305.04 $22,050.66 

Expenditure per 

Pupil $18.49 $144.62 $39.03 

* Based on estimated receipts. 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES AND PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1954 

I. General Control: 

Salaries „ $11,340.87 $12,113.53 $13,595.00 

Expenses .. 313.61 1,120.63 1,375.00 

II. Instruction : 

Salaries „ 68,316.50 77,037.00 89,470.00 

Textbooks 2,374.44 3,717.24 3,607.00 

Supplies 3,448.85 5,088.42 4,596.00 

Other Expenses 1,526.00 

III. Operation : 

Salaries 4,828.32 6,169.19 9,000.00 

Fuel .. 4,427.50 6,253.38 5,900.00 

Supplies and Misc. 939.47 1,474.88 1,259.00 

Utilities 2,579.67 3,177.46 4,250.00 

IV. Maintenance : 

Repairs and Upkeep 1,411.87 3,965.87 3,940.00 

V. Auxiliary Agencies: 

Health 567.27 939.15 885.00 

Transportation 18,383.72 22,050.66 24,900.00 

Tuition 27,013.67 29,047.89 35,664.00 

Miscellaneous 293.01 466.43 200.00 

VI. Vocational 219.50 585.43 1,330.00 

VII. New Equipment 2,013.50 1,016.77 1,986.00 

$148,471.77 $174,224.03 $203,483.00 

* Included in other categories. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



111 



GRADUATED IN JUNE, 
Grade VIII 



1953 



Roger Christopher Avery- 
Joseph Leo Bertolami 
Sally Frances Billings 
Marilyn Ruth Blom 
Manley Bernard Boyce, II 
Phyllis R. Campobasso 
Evelyn Jean Chausse 
Laurence Cousins, Jr. 
Rollin Jonathan Fairbanks, Jr. 
Barbara Farnsworth 
Sylvia Walker Fitts 
John W. A. Gilman 
Robert D. Gray 
Phyllis Harvey 
Barclay Stephens Henderson 
Walery Chodskyj 

(Valery Hodsky) 



Jacqueline May Holmes 
James Mitchell Howard 
Constance Mae Huntley 
Francis William Lavery 
Alan McClennen, Jr. 
Mary Jane Mayo 
Sally C. Meade 
* Stephen Evans Murphy 
*Blythe Susan Page 
Charles T. Phillips 
Jean Robbins 
Dorothy Hildred Snelling 
Kerme Styron 
Carol Wells 
Marshall Whithed 
Mary Diane Williamson 



Robert Ashworth 
Beverly Bean 
Priscilla Giles 
Joan Huntley 
Howard Maher 



Concord High School 

Judith Parks 
Adeline* Rando 
Donald Robinson 
Mary Ann Snelling 
Allan Stockellburg 
Marian Stuart 



Weston High School 

Theresa Argento David Hess 

Elizabeth A. Bigelow Jean Loud 

Llewellyn Bigelow Alan Phillips 

Carla Wilson 



Honors 

David Hess 2nd Prize Essay Contest Am. Legion Aux., 

WestOn 
Jean Loud 2nd Honors Weston, 3rd Prize Sears Essay 

Contest 
Alan Phillips 1st Honors Weston, Alumni Award 

Carla Wilson 3rd Honors Weston, Scholarship Women's 

Community League 
Marion Stuart Pierce Secretarial School Scholarship 

* deCordova Award. 



112 



EDUCATION AND RECREATION 



Name 



STAFF ROSTER — JANUARY I, 1954 

Position Training 



Douglas B. Roberts Superintendent Tufts College 
of Schools B.S., M.A. 



Robert B. Patch 



Louis J. Sapienza 



Principal — 
New School 



State Teachers' College 
Fitchburg B.S. Ed. 



Principal— Boston University, B.S. Ed. 

Center School 



Appointed 
1953 

1952 

1950 



Phyllis Johnson 


Grade One 


Lesley College, B.S. Ed. 


1946 


Augusta F. Sisk 


Grade Four 


Boston University, B.S.Ed., Ed. M. 


1946 


Ann G. Paranya 


Language Arts 


S.T.C. Montclair, N.J..A.B. 


1949 


Irma Antonangeli 


Grade Four 


Fitchburg State Teachers' College 
B.S. , Ed. 


1950 


Hazel Flagg 


Grade Five 


Sargent 


1951 


Miriam Zartarian 


Art 


Tufts College, B.S. Ed. 


1951 


Joan B. Warren 


Kindergarten 


Boston University, B.S. Ed. Ed.M. 


1951 


Prudence Morey 


Grade Five 


Duke University, A.B. 


1952 


Jane Owen 


Kindergarten 


Wheaton College, A.B. 


1952 


Jane L. Brown 


Grade Two 


Boston University, B.S. in Elm. Ed. 


1953 


Harry T. Burke 


Social Studies 


University of So. California, B.S.E. 


1953 


Priscilla Cook 


Grade Three 


Mt. Holyoke, B.A. 


1953 


Francine D. Fish 


Grade Two 


Hood College, B.A. 


1953 


Henry F. Guarino 


Music 


New England Conservatory of 
Music, B.M. 


1953 


Marion T. Howard 


Mathematics 


Gorman State Teachers' College 


1953 


Janet J. Kassler 


Grade One 


Tufts College, B.A. 


1953 


Priscilla M. Lahar 


Grade Two 


Boston University, B.S. Ed. 


1953 


Flores H. LeBoeuf 


Science, 

Home Arts 


Tulane University, B.A. 


1953 


Robert J. Lemieux 


Manual Arts 


Gorham State Teachers' 
College, B.S. 


1953 



Albert S. Reed Physical Education Springfield College, B.S., M.Ed. 1953 

Mary G. Swalen Grade One Univ. of California, Berkeley, B=A. 1953 



Slatist'LcaL Unformatbn 



VITAL STATISTICS 

67 Births, 19 Marriages and 25 Deaths were recorded 
during" the year 1953. 



Births 



Date of 
Birth 

1937 
Dec 27 

1952 
Dec 19 
Dec 5 
Dec 13 

1953 
Jan 3 
Jan 5 
Jan 10 
Jan 12 
Jan 16 
Jan 22 
Jan 24 
Feb 2 
Feb. 11 
Feb 13 
Feb 16 
Feb 22 
Mar 6 
Mar 7 
Mar 12 
Mar 17 
Mar 21 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Katherien Henriette Van Leer Hans L. and Mary C. Van Leer 



Judith Ann Murphy- 
Susan Hunter Henderson 
Dake Granville Henderson 

Elaine Mary Parker 
Mary Wharton Sturgis 
Edward Falter 
Deirdre Whittier Davis 
Anne Elizabeth Culkins 
Peter Douglas Lawton 
Janette Louise York 
Stephen Dennis Geary 
Ruth Frances Corrigan 
Jeffrey Frank Seeckts 
Ramelle Frost Adams 
Dennis Robert Stockwell 
Sandra Bisbee Warner 
John Ray Hester 
Roger Conant Hale 
Caren Ann Wilfert 
Sally Ann Shurling 



Edward W. and Marjorie A. M. Murphy 
Robert S. and Caroline G. Henderson 
Gerard C. and Edith M. Henderson 

Jackson B. and Jacqueline S. Parker 
Alanson H. Jr. and Anne H. Sturgis 
Thomas A. and Theresa H. Falter 
Henry R. Jr. and Jean K. Davis 
Leo M. and Barbara E. D. Culkins 
John J. and Beatrice C. O. Lawton 
Norman E. and Muriel E. C. York 
Edward T. and Katherine E. D. Geary 
Edward D. and Ellen N. R. Corrigan 
Ehlert W. and Eleanor R. Seeckts 
Thomas B. and Ramelle C. Adams 
Robert A. and Doris J. L. Stockwell 
John B. and Barbara L. K. Warner 
Leon B. and Mary B. Hester 
Hazen G. Jr. and Gail R. Hale 
Fred J. and Eleanor E. M. Wilfert 
Watson M. and Emily T. S. Shurling 



114 



STATISTICAL 



Mar 21 Steven Timothy Shurling 

Mar 25 Andrea Louise Doherty 

Mar 25 Taru Ingrid Gustafson 

Mar 28 Elizabeth Anne Algeo 

Apr 5 Stephen Harris Clark 

Apr 9 Robert Lloyd Baylis 

Apr 24 Andrew Charles Butler 

Apr 30 Julia Moulton Ragan 

May 3 Roger Demarest Friend 

May 4 Sara Elizabeth Meyer 

May 5 Jennifer Giles Peterson 

May 12 Stephen Dennis Murphy 

May 18 Linda Anne LeBlanc 

May 20 Donald Johnston Prescott 

May 22 Ann Marie Campobasso 

Junel2 David Michael Regan 

Junel6 Eleanor Goddard Daniels 

June23 Gaetan Paul Adelaide Van 

der Ostende 

Jul 2 Judith Anne Rowe 

Jul 6 Daniel James Ryan 

Jul 6 John Harrington Grabill 

Jul 13 Dennis Joseph Daniels 

Jul 13 James Frederick Rice 

Jul 15 Patricia Weld Emmons 

Jul 29 Eric Rodney Cowen 

\ug 1 Frederick Leslie Cole 4th 

Aug 3 Warner Bayley Kingsbury 

Aug 9 Kevin Philip Corrigan 

Aug 11 Peter Anthony Troisi 

Aug 12 Darlene Marie Rando 

Aug 12 Richard Frederick Schroeder Jr. 

Aug 16 Catherine Webster Test 

Aug 16 Christopher Michael Jackson 

Aug 21 Elizabeth Ann Kennedy 

Aug 30 William Hayes Cunningham 

Aug 31 Susan Farley 

Sep 7 William Heap Butler 3rd 

Oct 1 Susan Rousmaniere Avery 

Oct 6 Christopher Reasoner Walkey 

Oct 11 Alden Charles Blaney 

Oct 19 Margaret Meredith Luce 

Nov 27 Edward Joseph Chisholm Jr. 

Nov 28 Jennifer Greene 

Dec 6 George Warren Bramhall Jr. 

Dec 9 Colin Maclaurin 

Dec. 16 Allen Morley Lush 



Watson M. and Emily T. S. Shurling 
William R. and Phyllis M. L. Doherty 
Edwin A. and Doris M. C. Gustafson 
Leo J. and Elaine T. C. Algeo 
William V. Jr. and Mary F. H. Clark 
Lloyd T. and Jeanne C. P. Baylis 
Hector and Audrey E. M. Butler 
Ralph R. and Ruth S. M. Ragan 
Harold C. and Leigh D. B. Friend 
James W. and Carol E. H. Meyer 
Frank W. and Mary E. G. Peterson 
William F. and Ruth M. Murphy 
Alphonse J. and Alice M. L. LeBlanc 
Howard and Shirley A. B. Prescott 
Athony B. and Dorothy M. I. Campobasso 
Joseph C. and Joan N. B. Regan 
Bruce G. and Janet B. Daniels 
Andrea J. and Anne V. Van den Ostende 

Lawrence L. and Mildred H. M. Rowe 
James J. and Helen M. B. Ryan 
Elliott V. and Martha L. Grabill 
Francis J. and Claire M. M. Daniels 
James F. Jr. and Barbara A. C. Rice 
Alfred B. and Judith R. Emmons 
Rodney P. and Eleinor J. H. Cowen 
Frederick L. and Joan F. T. Cole 
Roy S. and Ann E. B. Kingsbury 
Philip C. and Muriel A. K. Corrigan 
Ferdinand L. and Mary G. M. Troisi 
Felice S. and Josephine H. M. Rando 
Richard F. and Constance C. Schroeder 
Edward W. and Jean M. Test 
Gardner Jr. and Sallie P. L. Jackson 
John T. and Virginia E. T. Kennedy 
Robert M. and Claire S. Cunningham 
Louis C. Jr. and Isabel K. Farley 
William H. Jr. and Nancy E. G. Butler 
Stuart B. Jr. and Abigail D. Avery 
Frederick P. and Ruth H. R. Walkey 
Calvin E. and Katherine P. H. Blaney 
Peter P. and Margaret H. Luce 
Edward J. and Margaret F. R. Chisholm 
Frederick H. Jr. and Helen S. H. Greene 
George W. and Mary A. M. Bramhall 
Richard C. and Ellen R. Maclaurin 
Morley J. and Mary K. N. Lush 



VITAL STATISTICS 



115 



Marriages 



Date of 

Marriages Names 

Jan 23 Perry Stone Sitz 

Martha A. Whittemore 



Residence 

Florida 
Lincoln 



Feb 7 Elmer Bernhardt Anderson 
Patricia Ann MacFarland 



Connecticut 
Lincoln 



Feb 27 John Michael Carney 
Susan Wiley 

Apr 5 James Joseph Corrigan 
Virginia Ann Olsen 

Apr 5 Frank Warren Gordon Jr. 
Rosemary O'Connell 

May 17 Charles R. Manning 
Emily Beatrice 

May 23 Norman Wayne Stockellburg 
Martha Elaine Foster 



Connecticut 
Lincoln 



Lincoln 
Concord 



Lincoln 
Concord 



Lincoln 
Newton 



Lincoln 
Concord 



Jun 6 Joseph Robert Campobasso 
Mary Anne Theresa Nichols 

Jul 18 Peter Whitcomb Rand 
Alice Bartlett Hildreth 

Aug 8 William Joseps O'Sullivan Jr. 
Mary Geraldine Commane 

Sep 5 Henry Taillacq 

Jean Henrietta Hart Earle 

Sep, 5 Robert Karl vanLeer 
Rachel Palmer Davis 



Lincoln 
Lincoln 

Lincoln 
Portland, Maine 

Lincoln 
Dorchester 

Lincoln 
Cambridge 

Lincoln 
Lincoln 



Sep 12 Peter G. Denton 

Sherlie W. Spencer 

Sep 19 Edward F. Cook 

Phyllis M. Norman 

Sep 12 Harold A. Whitney Jr 
Arlene Lois Pollock 



New York 
Lincoln 



Lincoln 
Cambridge 



Lincoln 
Waltham 



Sep 19 Norman Eliot Gibbs 
Emma Montanari 

Oct 10 Sherman Prescott Davis 
Phyllis Marjorie Davis 

Nov 5 Jonathon C. Robinson 
Carolyn Olsen 

Nov 25 Arthur Allen Chute Jr. 
Janet Joyce Hall 



Lincoln 

Stow, Vermont 

Lincoln 
Bedford 

Lincoln 
Concord 

Lincoln 
Lincoln 



116 



STATISTICAL 



Deaths 



Death 


Name 


Jan 8 


Nils Swanson 


Jan 24 


Elizabeth Cunningham 


Jan 24 


Constance Rathbone Taylor 


Feb 5 


Daniel J. Ryan 


Mar 8 


Barry Bigelow 


Apr 1 


Jennie Stockellburg 


Apr 7 


Richard Thomson 


Apr 20 


Robert L. DeNormandie 


May 1 


Catherine E. Shea 


May 5 


Claire LeBlanc 


May 8 


Helen L. Cunnert 


Jul 1 


Mary Eliza Somerby 


Jul 2 


George Leon Holmes 


Augll 


Mary M. Riley 


Aug-20 


Henry J. Kennedy 


Aug31 


Caroline Townsend Monks 


Sep 11 


Delia M. Bowles 


Sep 27 


Fern Adele Johnson 


Oot 2 


James P. Coan 


Oct 6 


Riley Williams 


Oct 10 


Frank Dadmun 


Nov 8 


Lily T. Chapman 


Nov20 


Madelyn Louise Cousins 


Nov24 


Mary M. Younker 


Dec 17 


Clarence Marshall 





Age 




r 


M 


D 


81 


6 


26 


75 








49 


3 


29 


72 


9 


5 


55 





14 


58 








26 








76 








59 


4 


19 


3 


11 


27 


77 


1 


7 


79 


10 


5 


21 








75 


1 





57 








63 


8 


22 


73 





5 


59 


1 


6 


70 


1 


9 


92 


5 


24 


85 





3 


65 


10 


15 


50 


5 


8 


70 








67 


4 


15 



VALUATION LIST 



117 



Valuation List, January 1, 1953 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Abbott, John A. and Diana B 

Adams, John Q. and Lucy D 

Adams, John Quincy „ „ 

Adams, Ramelle C .. 

Adams, Thomas B 

Adkins, Archibald W. and 

Dorothea C ~ 

A'Hearn, Marian E 

Albano Bros .. 

Algeo, John T. and Catherine R. 

Algeo, Leo J. and Elaine T 

Algeo, Mary A .. 

Allen, Lloyd R 

Allied Commonwealth Corp 

Ammen, David L. and Judith B. 
Anderson, Lawrence B. and 

Rosina DuP - „ 

Andrews, Paul R. and 

Catherine L „ 

Antinarelli, Joseph J. and 

Helen J „ 

Appleby, Richard B M 

Aptt, Harry S. and Etta E 

Arnold, S. Leonard and Anna M. 
Ashworth, Harold T. and Irma D. 

Avery, Abigail D 

Ayer, Richard B. Jr. and 

Constance 

Aylward, Augustine J 

Baggs, Arthur E. Jr. and 

Marion S 

Baker, John C. and Elizabeth E. 

Baker, Margaret C „ 

Baker, Theodore C. and 

Mary Amory „ 

Baltrush, William C. and 

Sarah M - „ 

Barber, John W. Jr. and Mary E. 





$7,050 


$338.40 




39,550 


1,898.40 


$800 




38.40 




12,850 


616.80 


200 




9.60 




10,000 


480.00 




3,150 


151.20 




300 


14.40 




5,000 


240.00 




4,400 


211.20 




4,600 


220.80 




250 


12.00 




46,000 


2,208.00 




5,050 


242.40 




13,300 


638.40 




2,300 


110.40 




500 


24.00 




4,500 


216.00 




3,250 


156.00 




4,000 


216.00 




7,000 


336.00 




7,500 


360.00 




9,000 


432.00 




1,000 


48.00 




6,700 


321.60 




2,000 


96.00 




5,000 


240.00 




9,250 


444.00 




3,300 


158.40 




1,400 


67.20 



118 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Bardsley, Doris A „ 

Barker, Elliot R 

Barnaby, John M. and 

Charlotte B „ 

Barthel, Walter and Emma C 

Barthel, Walter „.„ 

Baylis, Lloyd T. and Leonne P. ... 

Bean, Anna K 

Beebe, Alice W „ 

Beers, Roland F. and Helen C. 
Belanger, Walter E. and Mary F. 
Benton, Carl R. and Barbara A. 

Bernson, Bob 300 

Bernson, Bob and Edith J 

Bernson, Edith J ~ 

Bergquist, Walter J. and 

Brita M „ 

Bertolami, Leo F 235 

Bertolami, Leo F. and Rose M. ... 

Bertolami, Paolina .. 

Billings, Bruce H. and 

Virginia M .. .. 

Billings, Bruce H. and Sarah W. 

Billings, James B. and Marion 

Bingham, Elizabeth A „ 

Bingham, Elizabeth P. B 

Bingham, George C. 

Black, Everett A. and Anne E. 
Blake, Charles H. and Helen L. 

Blake, Donald D. and Alicia 

Boccadoro, Joseph and Ida 

Bockoven, John Sanbourne and ■-.___ 

Dorothy Ruth „ 

Bogner, Walter F. and Edith 

Bonia, Walter J .. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Robert H. „ 35 

Boston & Maine R.R 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co 85,000 

Boston Edison Co - 154,263 

Bowles, Clifford - - 

Bowles, Mildred E 50 

Bowles, William „ 1,075 



2,600 


124.80 


1,500 


72.00 


4,600 


220.80 


4,950 


237.60 


100 


4.80 


5,500 


264.00 


6,000 


288.00 


47,000 


2,256.00 


10,650 


511.20 


7,400 


355.20 


100 


4.80 


2,650 


141.60 


3,350 


160.80 


18,000 


864.00 


3,500 


168.00 




11.28 


4,700 


225.60 


400 


19.20 


7,280 


349.44 


750 


36.00 


10,650 


511.20 


9,250 


444.00 


250 


12.00 


500 


24.00 


32,000 


1,536.00 


10,500 


504.00 


4,550 


218.40 


100 


4.80 


3,600 


172.80 


9,200 


441.60 


5,400 


259.20 


500 


24.00 


14,300 


688.08 


900 


43.20 




4,080.00 




7,404.62 


7,000 


336.00 


12,150 


585.60 


4,000 


243.60 



VALUATION LIST 



119 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Boyce, Brothers 3,500 

Boyce, John J. and Mary M 

Boyce, Manley B 

Boyce, Manley B. and Alice M. 

Boyce, Michael J 

Bradford, Robert L. and 

Martha A ~ 

Bradshaw, Fred and Julia S. 

Briggs, Susan L „ 

Brisson, N. F. Inc „ „ 300 

Brooks, Albert S. and Maude M. 

Brooks, Paul „ 

Brown, Elizabeth G 

Brown, Gordon C. and Persis A. 
Brown, Marion I. and 

Bernice I. Stevens 

Brown, Robert P. and Polly F 

Browne, Secor D. and Mary D. 
Browning, Edgar C. and 

Katherine A ......... 

Browning, George U » .. 2,110 

Buerger, Martin J. and Lila ,. 

Burckett, Douglas M. and 

Phillippa C - ...... .„ 

Burgess, Catherine M 

Burgess, Rebecca M. and 

Jeddrie, Mary M. ........ 

Burke, Edward J. and Helen V. 

Burns, Melvin P 

Burns, William C. and 

Daisy May Day 

Rusfield, Gibson L. and 

Marilyn A 

Butcher, Charles R 

Butcher, Henry A. Jr. and 

Margaret V 

Butcher, Ralph E 225 

Buthman, Fred A. and Edna E. 
Butler, William H. and Mary G. 

Buttrick, David Co 2,700 

Buxton, David and Lois Pardee 
Bygrave. Robert and Lucy E 





168.00 


12,000 


576.00 


3,000 


144.00 


2,500 


120.00 


4,500 


216.00 


5,300 


254.40 


5,000 


240.00 


13,500 


648.00 


1,450 


84.00 


5,400 


259.20 


9,750 


468.00 


14,000 


672.00 


1,200 


57.60 


3,000 


144.00 


7,150 


343.20 


7,000 


336.00 


4,950 


237.60 


6,000 


389.28 


12,000 


576.00 


500 


24.00 


1,500 


72.00 


3,250 


156.00 


4,500 


216.00 


4,400 


211.20 



,000 



144.00 



5,500 


264.00 


1,950 


93.60 


2,100 


100.80 


4,300 


217.20 


500 


24.00 


4,750 


228.00 


0,100 


614.40 


6,000 


288.00 


6 ; 500 


312.00 



120 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Caisey, Roland J 

Calkins, Ramona T. and Whittier 
Campbell, Fannie S. and 

Adeline S 

Campobasso, Anthony B. and 

Dorothy M , 

Campobasso, Ethel 

Campobasso, Joseph R 

Cannella, Brothers „ 2,000 

Cannella, James J. and John C. 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. and 

Bradford 

Carman, Eleanor T 

Carney, Florence T 

Carrig, James A 

Carstensen, Warren and 

Evelyn G 

Cassidy, Henry J. and Verna E. 

Cassidy, Patrick « .. 

Cassis, Anthony 

Catoia, Angelo and Mary J 

Catoia, Anthony J. and 

Lucy M. A ~ 

Causer, William 0. and Mary E. 
Chadwick, William and Jessie T. 
Chapin, Louise B. and Bertha L. 
Chapin, Robert C. and 

Margaret E 

Chapman, James S ~ 

Chapman, Lily T 

Chellis, Herbert N. and 

Eleanor M 

Chipman, Robert Hennessy 

Chisholm, Edward C. and 

Margaret F 

Chu, Chauncey C. and Margaret 
Church, Robert T. and 

Priscilla Schirmer 

Churchill, Robert R. and June D. 
Cibel, Stanley A. and Thelma W. 

Ciraso, Michael and Amelia 

Clark, George A 30 

Clark, W. Van Alan and Mary H. 



4,200 
4,500 

7,500 



201.60 
216.00 

360.00 



3,100 


148.80 


1,500 


72.00 


1,820 


87.36 




96.00 


3,800 


182.40 


22,800 


1,094.40 


10,100 


484.80 


3,575 


171.60 


5,500 


264.00 


20,500 


984.00 


3.650 


175.20 


400 


19.20 


10,000 


480.00 


3,100 


148.80 


2,850 


136.80 


3,300 


158.40 


5,000 


240.00 


11,500 


552.00 


3,500 


168.00 


4,775 


229.20 


750 


36.00 


4,500 


216.00 


5,000 


240.00 


5,000 


240.00 


1,000 


48.00 


10,100 


484.80 


5,400 


259.20 


6,300 


302.40 


3,650 


175.20 


3,100 


150.24 


6,900 


331.20 



VALUATION LIST 



121 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 






Coan, James P 

Coan, Thomas F 

Coane, John H. Jr . 

Coburn, Edward S 460 

Codman, Thomas N. et al. 

Trustees .. 500 

Codman, Dorothy S. F. M - 

Coffey, John B. and Wilma L 

Cole, Edwin M. and Lucy F. .... 

Cole, Nancy W ~ 

Collins, Mary Brewster 

Comey, Arthur C. and 

Elizabeth P „ 

Community Store 1500 

Comstock, Joan B 

Conant, Lily R .. 

Conary, Frances P ~ 

Concannon, Marian E 

Condit, Robert P. and Phyllis C. 
Conlin, James J. and 

Winifred Irene 

Connair, John J. and Margaret J. 
Connally, J. Irving and Evelyn... 

Conti, Bartolomeo B 

Cook, Brothers 500 

Cook, Harry and John F 

Corcoran, Francis J .. 

Cormey, Henry J. and Illione W. 

Corrigan, Edward D 

Corrigan, John F. and Mary 

Corrigan, Leo W 

Corrigan, Martin 

Corrigan, Mary 

Costello, John D 

Costello, William H m 

Cotoni, Carolana M 

Cotoni, Joseph 3,000 

Cousins, Ashley B > 

Cousins, Harold S 

Cousins, Laurence B. and 

Jeanne B 

Cousins, Willis N 

Cowen, Rodney P. and Elinor 

Cowles, Addison and 



3,250 


156.00 


3,350 


160.80 


2,250 


108.00 


6,200 


319.68 


67,300 


3,254.40 


5,000 


240.00 


3,500 


168.00 


11,200 


537.60 


8,800 


422.40 


6,900 


331.20 


8,000 


384.00 




72.00 


7,350 


352.80 


9,000 


432.00 


4,500 


216.00 


4,200 


201.60 


5,000 


240.00 


1,600 


76.80 


3,100 


148.80 


3,450 


165.60 


6,750 


324.00 




24.00 


4,850 


232.80 


3,000 


144.00 


3,400 


163.20 


3,500 


168.00 


7,000 


336.00 


2,300 


110.40 


2,400 


115.20 


1,500 


72.00 


100 


4.80 


1,800 


86.40 


4,600 


220.80 




144.00 


2,400 


115.20 


12,750 


612.00 


4,400 


211.20 


3,450 


165:60 


2,100 


100:80 



122 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


"Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Alexandra C ~ 

Crandall, Stephen H. and 

Patricia E 

Crane, Charles E. and Hazel G. 

Crawford, Dorothy B 

Crawford, John D. and 

Joanna W .. 

Creelman, Gilmore B. and 

Alice M .. 

Croft, Robert . 

Crook, Russell G 

Crowley, Timothy J 

Crowson, Leslie W. and 

Madeline W .. 

Crozier, Christina B .. .. 

Culver, Perry J. and Kate S 

Cunnert, Fritz, Est. of „ 1,000 

Cunningham, Elizabeth A 

Cunningham, Elizabeth A. and 

Edward B 

Cunningham, George E 

Cunningham, Harold L. and 

C orrine „ 

Cunningham, Robert M „ 

Cushing, Gustave 

Dahl, Thyra 

Damico, Louise 

Daniels, Bruce G 

Danosky, Edward A 350 

Danosky, Edward A. and Mary C. 

Danosky, Stefania 1,000 

D'Arigo Bros., Inc „ 

Davis, Alfred M. .... .. 1,250 

Davis, Bradford D. and 

Barbara G „ .. 

Davis, Prescott L 2,585 

Davis, Saville R. and Anita V 

Davison, Archibald T 

Davison, Everett H - 

Dean, Emma W « 

Dean, Louis W - 3,750 

Dean, William M .-.„.... 



5,150 

1,250 

15,000 

6,000 

5,000 



247.20 

60.00 
720.00 
288.00 

240.00 



3,550 


170.40 


200 


9.60 


3,000 


144.00 


2,000 


96.00 


6,800 


326.40 


5,000 


240.00 


10,000 


480.00 


6,500 


360.00 


500 


24.00 


3,200 


153.60 


4,915 


235.92 


3,600 


172.80 


2,900 


139.20 


4,500 


216.00 


5,800 


278.40 


2,350 


112.80 


11,500 


552.00 


1,500 


88.80 


3,600 


172.80 


9,650 


511.20 


2,400 


115.20 


4,750 


288.00 


10,200 


489.60 


9,100 


560.88 


7,500 


360.00 


13,000 


624.00 


2,600 


124.80 


3,200 


153.60 


9,800 


650.40 


1,000 


48,00 



VALUATION LIST 



123 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Dean, William M. and 

Lorraine C .- 

Dee, Helena A . 

Dee, Thomas J., Est, of. 

DeFord, William and Elinor S. 
Denehy, Edward J. and 

Bernadette J. ... 700 

Denio, F. Winchester . - 

DeNormandie, Alice W - 

DeNormandie, James 8,475 

DeNormandie, James and Martha 
DeNormandie, James and 

Robert L - . 

DeNormandie, Robert L,, Est. of 

DePavla, Dominick 

Dewey, Davis R. II 

Diamond, James E . . 

Dodge, Orien B „ 

Doherty, Josephine C 

Doherty, Matthew H 1,600 

Doherty, Matthew H. and 

Elizabeth H - 

Doherty, Mary E., Margaret A. 

and Marjorie - 

Dole, Gertrude E . 

Dominichello, Dominic . 

Domini chello, Frank 685 

Dominichello, Frank and Mattie 
Donaldson, Charlotte H., Est. of 

Donaldson, Donald . 85 

Donaldson, Gordon A 12 

Donaldson, Gordon A. and 

Elizabeth A 

Donaldson, Malcolm D 

Donaldson, Robert D 

Donaldson, Robert D. Jr 

Donnelly, Bernard F. and 

Josephine B 

Dorian, Newart 

Dougherty, Andrew J 2,445 

Dougherty, Dennis M , 

Dresser, CharJes N. and Ruth C. 
DuBois, Anson. M, and Olive S. 



3,000 


144.00 


2,000 


96.00 


2,200 


105.60 


7,100 


340.80 


10,900 


556.80 


3,500 


168.00 


34,500 


1,656.00 


2,000 


502.80 


9,950 


477.60 


32,750 


1,572.00 


21,925 


1,052.40 


500 


24.00 


15,600 


748.80 


1,100 


52.80 


2,850 


136.80 


11,000 


528.00 




76.80 



13,800 



662.40 



2,000 


96.00 


2,880 


138.24 


500 


24.00 




32.88 


3,800 


182.40 


8,000 


384.00 




4.08 




.57 


7,000 


336.00 


8,250 


396.00 


67,600 


3,244.80 


6,500 


312.00 


1,500 


72.00 


3,750 


180.00 


6,350 


422.16 


2,900 


139.20 


5,600 


268.80 


5,100 . 


244.80 



124 



STATISTICAL 



Name of Taxpayer 



Value of 
Personal 

Estate 



Value of 
Real 

Estate 



Real and 

Personal 

Estate 



DuBois, Eliot and Barbara 



4,900 



235.20 



East, John A. and Edla A 

Eaton, Gertrude S 

Ehlert, Heirs of Ellen 

Emerson, Heirs of Edward W 

Emerson, Heirs of Ralph Waldo... 
Ennis, Walter M. Jr. and 

Barbara R - ~ 

Erickson, Leonard B. and 

Martha F 

Evans, Lucius W. and Virginia C. 

Fairbanks, Rollin - ~ 

Faran, James J. and Ellen G 

Farley, Louis C. and Isabel K 

Farnsworth, Kenneth C. and 

Marguerite M 

Faunce, Mary Gill and Anthony... 

Fedock, Metro and Hazel A 

Fell, Florence C „ 

Fernald, Alvin E 200 

Fillmore, Bruce R. and 

Eleanor L „ 

Finnerty, James L. and Anna C. 30 

Fiorelli, Ernest R. and Rose M. ... 
Fitts, Charles K. and 

Gertrude W 

Flanagan, James and 

Wilhelmina G .... 

Flannery, Donald J. and 

Harriet E 

Fleck, Richard C. and Frances R. 
Fleming, Clifford D. and 

E. Frances .. 

Fletcher, Walter B. and Helen F. 
Flewelling, Roy S. and Thelma G. 
Flint, Edward W. Ex, u/w 

Ephraim B. .............................. 

Flint, Henry R 400 

Flint, Josephine R 

Flint, Warren F. 3,950 

Floyd, Olive B. ........... 

Flynn, Helen C 



5,500 


264.00 


7,500 


360.00 


5,625 


270.00 


500 


24.00 


500 


24.00 



4,700 



225.60 



5,000 


240.00 


16,500 


792.00 


12,500 


600.00 


1,050 


50.40 


4,600 


220.80 


15,500 


744.00 


9,500 


456.00 


2,650 


127.20 


5,400 


259.20 


5,900 


292.80 


4,400 


211.20 


4,650 


224.64 


400 


19.20 


16,500 


792.00 


700 


33.60 


2,125 


102.00 


10,600 


508.80 


6,500 


312.00 


6,750 


324.00 


4,100 


196.80 


1,900 


91.20 




19.20 


11,000 


528.00 


13,000 


813.60 


4,500 


216.00 


8,700 


417.60 



VALUATION LIST 



125 



Nam<= of Taxpayer 



Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




400 


19.20 




1,800 


86.40 




8,750 


420.00 



Flynn, Frank J .. -.. 

Foley, Harold F. and Rita E 

Foley, Harold W 

Foote, Howard W. and 

Jeanne M „ 

Forbes, Sherman H. and 

Annabell .. „ 

Forest Realty Trust 

Fradd, Norman W .. 

Frasier, Joseph G. and Harriet E. 
Fredrikson, Arvid E. and 

Esther A 

Fryatt, Thomas F „ 

Fuller, Ernest L. and Doris O 

Fullerton, Albert L. Jr. and 

Mary S. 

Garland, Joseph and Mira C 

Garrison, David L. and Alice E. 
Garrison, John B. and Barbara F. 

Gary, John E. and Maida F 

Geary, Edward T. and 

Katherine E .. 

Gertz, George L. and Edith A 

Gibbs, Norman E. and Leigh H. 

Giblin, Mary E. and Ruth E 

Gilbert, John W. and 

Josephine L 

Gilbert, Joseph H 5 

Gilbert, Mary J 

Gilboy, Glennon and 

Elizabeth W 

Giles, Edmund W. and Muriel H. 

Giles, E, W. Inc 1,350 

Giles, Thomas T 1,050 

Giles, Thomsa T. and Stella A. ... 
Gilfoy, Donald A. and Helen B. 
Guirleo, James M. and Mary C. 
Glazier, L. Gordon and Gertrude 

Gordon, Marie C 

Grabill, Elliott V. and Martha L. 

Graf, Malcolm 

Grason, Rufus L. and Edna B 



6,000 



5,000 



288.00 



5,500 


264.00 


600 


28.80 


7,500 


360.00 


300 


14.40 


3,500 


168.00 


6,700 


321.60 


9,300 


446.40 



240.00 



2,500 


120.00 


6,200 


297.60 


7,800 


374.40 


8,000 


384.00 


8,300 


398.40 


4,200 


201.60 


7,600 


364.80 


6,630 


318.24 


2,500 


120.00 




.24 


2,500 


120.00 


10,000 


480.00 


14,600 


700.80 




64.80 




50.40 


7,700 


369.60 


12,000 


576.00 


10,000 


480.00 


19,000 


912.00 


4,200 


201.60 


11,000 


528.00 


2,000 


96.00 


1,200 


57.60 



126 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Gray, Robert W „ 

Gray, Thomas H. 3rd 

Greco, Louis and Katherine T 

Greene, Frederick H. Jr. and 

Helen H 

Griffin, Harriet S .. 

Grinnell, William L. and 

Virginia B - .. 

Gropius, Walter and Use .. 

Gross, T. A. 0. and Judith C. F. 
Gustafson, Edwin Anton and 

Doris Margaret ~ 

Haartz, John C. Jr. and 

Beatrice R ~ 

Haden, Russell L. and 

Constance J ~ 

Hagerty, Julia C - 

Hagman, Anna, Ext. u/w 

Fridolin Hagman 

Hagman, Otto and Katherine 

Hale, Hazen G. Jr. and 

Gail Robinson - 

Haley, Arthur E - 

Hall, Cecil E. and Nancy E 

Hamilton, Bessie E 

Hanlon, Albert W 

Hapgood, Norman Jr. and 

Ruth K 

Harding, Catherine 

Harling, Ernest J ~ ~ 

Harrington, F. Frank, Est. of 

Harrington, Katherine A 

Harrington, Winthrop W 

Hart, Frederick R 

Hart, Joseph S 

Hart, William E. and Isabella C. 

Hartman, Henry F 

Hartwell Farm - 1,000 

Hatheway, Louise A 4,710 

Haworth, George G. and 

Thelma E .. 



6,600 


316.80 


300 


14.40 


600 


28.80 


11,100 


532.80 


6,500 


312.00 


7,000 


336.00 


14.500 


696.00 


5,300 


254.40 



4,000 



10,600 



192.00 



508.80 



5,700 


273.60 


3,000 


144.00 


3,850 


184.80 


5,000 


240.00 


1,400 


67.20 


1,500 


72.00 


7,000 


336.00 


4,800 


230.40 


5,000 


240.00 


3,000 


144.00 


2,500 


120.00 


4,500 


216.00 


1,750 


84.00 


2,000 


96.00 


4,100 


196.80 


200 


9.60 


6,000 


288.00 


9,000 


432.00 


3,700 


177.60 




48.00 


3,950 


6,655.68 



6,000 



288.00 



VALUATION LIST 



127 



Name of Taxpayer 

Healey, Harry R. Jr. and 

Jeanne C 

Heck, Mary Higbee 

Hedge, Mary A „ 

Helburn, Peter and Margaret 

Held, Arnold E. and Mary A 

Henderson, Ernest .... 

Henderson, Gerard C. and 

Edith M 

Henderson, Robert S. and 

Carolyn H 

Henley, Archibald and Lottie 

Henry, Hall M. and 

Addie McAllister 

Herlihy, Maurice K. and Jean E. 

Herman, Edwards W 

Herthel, Stephen W. and 

Evelyn S 

Hess, Kenneth W. and Alice B. ... 

Hester, Leon B. and Mary B 

Hews, Charles A. and Annie F. 
Hinds, Edward H. and Edith M. 

Hinds, Evelyn W 

Hoar, George W. and Norman W. 
Hollingsworth, Lowell M. and 

Florence S 

Hoover, Henry B. and 

Lucretia J 

Hornor, Townsend and 

Barbara G 

Houghton, John J. and Lillian 

Howard, Elizabeth F 

Howard, Esther T 

Hoyt, Harrison and Shirley J 

Hubbard, Eliot Jr 

Hunt, Lewis E 

Hunt, Merrill 

Hunt, Pearson and Merrill T 

Huntley, George F. and Lottie D. 
Huntley, Medford E. and 

Blanche L 

Huntley, Oland F. and Alberta T. 
Hurd, Joseph F, and Nellie M 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




4,700 


225.60 




30,800 


1,478.40 




10,500 


504.00 




2,200 


105.60 




4,200 


201.60 


200 




9.60 



5,000 



240.00 



5,000 


240.00 


4,640 


222.72 


10,000 


480.00 


3,300 


158.40 


12,200 


585.60 


13,650 


655.20 


9,500 


456.00 


5,000 


240.00 


3,500 


168.00 


100 


4.80 


8,000 


384.00 


9,500 


456.00 


7,000 


336.00 


7,300 


350.40 


18,200 


873.60 


3,800 


182.40 


13,000 


624.00 


9,400 


451.20 


2,700 


129.60 


9,100 


436.80 


3,900 


187.20 


13,420 


644.16 


6,500 


312.00 


4,350 


208.80 


3,700 


177. Go 


2,900 


139.20 


4,000 


L92 00 



128 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Hurd, Nancy Dabney - 

Hyde, Benjamin D. and 

Mildred B 

Irwin, Mary M „ 

Jackson, Dorothy W 

Jackson, Gardner S. and Sallie 

Jacobs, May L 

Jagger, James M. and Miriam H. 
Jenney, Charles J. and 

Katrina C 

Jensen, Holgar J. and Grace A. ... 

Jensen, Olin A. and Agnes E 

Johansen, Rose May 

John, DeWitt - 

Johnson, Ernest L. and Grace M. 

Johnson, Fern A „ 

Johnson, John W. and Josephine 
Jones, Chester L. and Anne B. ... 

Kane, Henry B. and Elizabeth C. 

Keene, Clifton R 

Keily, Delbar P. and Gertrude E. 

Keizer, Harold ~ 

Kelliher, John J 

Kennedy, Albert E „ 

Kennedy, John T. and Albert E. 

Kennedy Bros >. 

Kern, Walter P =...= 

Killoran, Martha 

Kindleberger, Charles P. and 

Sarah M 

King, Abigail A 

King, William T 

Kingsbury, Roy S. and Ann B. ... 

Kinney, Robert C 

Kinsler, Herman F. and 

Louise M 

Kirkpatrick, David W. and 

Margaret M 

Kistiakowsky, George B. and 

Irma E 



.00 



9,100 



8,500 



13,500 



436.80 



408.00 



648.00 



12,000 


576.00 


3,100 


148.80 


15,000 


720.00 


4,800 


230.40 


5,500 


264.00 


3,100 


148.80 


5,100 


244.80 


1,500 


72.00 


7,050 


338.40 


11,500 


552.00 


3,000 


144.00 


150 


7.20 


5,000 


240.00 


3,750 


180.00 


5,000 


240.00 


4,200 


201.60 


1,500 


72.00 


3,800 


182.40 


5,800 


278.40 


150 


7.20 




24.00 


350 


16.80 


3,850 


184.80 


5,450 


261.60 


12,000 


576.00 


15,700 


753.60 


2,500 


120.00 


2,000 


96.00 


5,500 


264.00 


5,000 


240.00 


11,500 


552.00 



VALUATION LIST 



J 29 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Kling, John W. and Louise 

Knowles, Harry B. Jr 250 

Knowles, Wilma E „ 

Kolyshkin, George, Estate of 

Kubik, Charles S. and Emily K. 

Ladd, Edward H. Jr. and 

Agnes E .. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 

Lahnstein, Karl F „ 

Langton, William G 

Larrabee, Leonard C. and 

Peggy S 

Lavery, Francis W. and 

Veronica J . 

Lavrakas, Fofo 

Lawson, Harold E 1,500 

Lawton, John J. and Beatrice G. 
Leavitt, Donald P. and 

Christine P 

LeBlanc, Alphonse J. and 

Alice M 

LeBlanc, Philias and Lena 

Lee, Edwin John 

Lemander, William C. and 

Emily K 

LeMann, John 

Lennon, James V. and Elin 

Leslie, Maurice A. and Annie M. 
Liddick, Harold S. and 

Virginia D 

Ligda, Myron G. H. and 

Evelyn D 

Lincoln Heights Estates Inc 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 250 

Lincoln, John W. and Clarinda Y. 
Linscott, Donald A. Jr. and 

Grace M 

Little, Rudolph 

Livengood, Eleanor C. H 

Llanover Trust 

Lorrey, Mildred J 

Lothrop, John W. and Ellen D. 



4,500 


216.00 




12.00 


5,000 


240.00 


3,030 


145.44 


6,000 


288.00 


5,250 


252.00 


1,500 


72.00 


3,200 


153.60 


7,000 


336.00 



5,900 



9,000 



0,700 



283.20 



6,200 


297.60 


2,150 


103.20 


8,150 


463.20 


5,100 


244.80 



432.00 



2,500 


120.00 


5,850 


280.80 


1,800 


86.40 


6,000 


288.00 


2,850 


136.80 


3,800 


182.40 


4,340 


208.32 



321.60 



2,900 


139.20 


10,500 


504.00 




12.00 


5,400 


259.20 


4,400 


211.20 


3,150 


151.20 


3,800 


182.40 


17,000 


816.00 


5,57f» 


207.60 


10,500 


504.00 



130 



STATISTICAL 





Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 



Loud, John F. and Mary L 

Luce, Peter Paul and Margaret... 

Lumus, John W. and Ann A 

Lunt, Heirs of Charles . 

Lustwerk, Ferdinand . 

Lynch, Edward H. Jr 

Lyon, Ruth . . 

Lyons, John J. and Ann V . 

Lyons, Martin and Winifred A. 

MacFarland, Charles C. and 

Phyllis M 

MacFarland, Ernest H „ 

Maclnnis, Daniel A. Jr. and 

Francis Clarke 

MacKenzie, Roland C . 

MacLaurin, Richard Collin 

and Ellen - 

MacLean, Heirs of Hector J 

MacLeod, Edward and Hester M. 
MacLeod, Edward Jr. and 

Mary M. .... . 

MacRae, Manning W 200 

Mahan, Russell P 

Mahar, Raymond and 

Gertrude M . 

Mallett, Herbert A. and Eva M. 
Malloy, Robert M. and Irene C. 

Mann, David W . . 6,500 

Mannarino, Heirs of Anna 

Manning, Joseph J. and 

Catherine L 

Manzelli, John . 

Mar, James W. and Edith 

Marchetti, John W. and 

Sarah G 

Maroni, Robert F. and 

Valentine R 

Martin, Fred and Marie 

Martin, John O. and Candida W. 

Martin, Wilhelmina W 

Mascari, Edward L 400 



10,000 


480.00 


8,250 


396.00 


4,750 


228.00 


2,500 


124.80 


5,000 


240.00 


3,600 


172.80 


3,700 


177.60 


900 


43.20 


4,380 


210.24 


2,750 


132.00 


6,000 


288.00 


3,050 


146.40 


12,000 


576.00 


11,000 


528.00 


4,350 


208.80 


2,850 


136.80 


1,100 


52.80 


5,500 


273.60 


8,000 


384.00 


3,200 


153.60 


2,600 


124.80 


9,000 


432.00 


22,900 


1,411.20 


1,500 


72.00 


4,700 


225.60 


5,200 


249.60 


5,000 


240.00 



8,000 



384.00 



1,250 


60.00 


5,000 


240.00 


3,500 


168.00 


9,500 


456.00 




19.20 



VALUATION LIST 



131 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Mascari, Leonard E. and 

Grace B „ 

Matthews, Ida Lucille W. and 

Marion Clark 

McClennen, Alan and Louise H. 
McCune, William J. and 

Elizabeth 

McHugh, Mary F „ „ 

McLellan, John W. and Julia C. 

McMillin, James B ....... 

McShane, Nellie ~ 

Mead, Varnum R. and Janice H. 
Meade, Edmund J. and 

Eleanor H - 

Melanson, Leonard J. and Mary 

Mele, John A. and Sarah L 

Mellish, Eugene D. and Nancy 

Meriam, Richard S. and Alice G. 
Merrill, Vincent N. and Anne S. 
Meyer, John R. Jr. and 

Marjorie R .. - 

Meyer, Robert V ~ 

Michel, Jules J. 

Militzer, Raymond E. and 

Martha B .. .. 

Miller, Henry D. and Mary E 

Miller, Mary G „ 

Mills, Cecil R. and Lillian M 

Mix, Thomas R. and Helen B 

Monks, Caroline T .. 

Monks, John P - .. 

Monks, John P. and Ann S 

Moody, Charles P. and 

Josephine C 

Moor, Edgar Jr. and Joan 

Moore, Herbert L. Jr. and 

Sylvia - » 

Moore, Paul 

Morgan, Henry M. and Gwen G. 

Morris, Milliage E 

Morris, Milliage E. and 

Beatrice M - .. 

Morris, Robert E. F. and 

Clara D 



700 



205 



11,000 



528.00 



3,500 


168.00 


12,500 


600.00 


8,300 


398.40 


5,950 


285.60 


3,150 


151.20 


2,100 


100.80 


100 


4.80 


4,500 


216.00 


3,500 


168.00 


4,000 


192.00 


4,300 


206.40 


4,500 


216.00 


12,350 


592.80 


1,000 


48.00 


5,250 


252.00 


5,300 


254.40 


10,040 


481.92 


18,000 


864.00 


8,300 


398.40 


5,500 


264.00 


3,650 


175.20 


2,250 


108.00 


6,750 


324.00 




33.60 


49,000 


2,352.00 


6,100 


292.80 


1,500 


72.00 


10,000 


480.00 


100 


4.80 


7,000 


336.00 




9.84 


2,400 


115.20 


3,700 


177.60 



132 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Morris, Robert H. and Irene S. ... 

Morrissey, Elizabeth Ann... 

Morrissey, John Joseph 

Morse, Thomas R 

Moses, John P. and Alice W 

Moszka, Stanley E. and Anna. „. 

Mukhitarian, Samuel and 

Stephanie - 

Mulledy, John A 

Mullins, Edward S. and 

Florence M „.... 

Murphy, Bridget 

Murphy, Cyrus W. and Persis S. 
Murphy, Daniel J. and Louise C. 

Murphy, Edward W. ~ --. 

Murphy, Heirs of Jeremiah ~ 

Murphy, Mina Dorothea....- 

Murphy, Otis W. and Patricia 

Murphy, William F „ 

Neary, Patrick J. and Alice B 

Nelson, Albert E. and 

Marjorie E „ 

Nelson, Erik J. and Dorothy D. 
Nelson, W. Newton and 

Eleanor R. ~ 

Neumann, Ernest P. and Sylvia 

Neville, Ellen M., Heirs of 

Neville, Mary A. and Delia M 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co 71,200 

Newell, Joseph S. and Lena M. ... 
Newton, Harland B. and Ethel H. 

Newton, Hazel H 

Nichols, Walter and Ethel D. ..... 

Nielsen, Svend H. and 

Virginia R 

Niles, Robert I. and Virginia M. 
Northeastern Gas Transmission 

Co. - - 

Norton, Paul L 

Norton, Paul and Margaret. 

Nystrom, Foster H. and Edna C. 

Ogden, Warren G. Jr 



4,500 


216.00 


500 


24.00 


5,500 


264.00 


12,300 


590.40 


6,500 


312.00 


2,800 


134.40 


4,050 


194.40 


600 


28.80 


250 


12.00 


4,500 


216.00 


3,450 


165.60 


4,550 


218.40 


5,000 


240.00 


3,500 


168.00 


3,500 


168.00 


50 


2.40 


10,750 


516.00 


4,200 


201.60 


5,900 


283.20 


3,000 


144.00 


9,450 


453.60 


8,250 


396.00 


500 


24.00 


4,000 


192.00 


4,000 


3,509.60 


8,500 


408.00 


7,300 


350.40 


5,800 


278.40 


5,100 


244.80 


5,900 


283.20 


7,000 


336.00 


43,850 


2,104.80 


1,500 


72.00 


6,500 


312.00 


6,500 


312,00 



6,000 



288.00 



VALUATION LIST 



133 





Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 



Olsen, Ralph and Marcia 

Olsen, Ralph - .. 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. and 

Camilla M .. 

Osborne, Gordon and Freda W. 

O'Sullivan, William J „ 400 

0' Sullivan, William J. and 

Mary E .. .. 

Owen, Carleton W ~ 

Paddock, Louis E. and Ann E. ... 

Paquette, Margaret - 

Page, Elliott F. and Emily R 

Page, William N. and 

Elizabeth J 

Paine, Charles H - 

Pallotta, Henry and Eleanor A. ... 
Palmer, Attelio A. and Kathryne 

Palmer, Eleanor M „ 

Panetta, Franklin and Theresa 

Panetta, Pasquale 350 

Panetta, Pasquale and Mary 

Parish, Edward C. Jr. and 

Joan DeF 

Parker, Jackson - 

Parker, William J. Jr. and 

Evangeline C 

Parks, Henry A. and 

Harriett A 

Pattinson, Mary I 

Pavlo, Samuel G .. .. 

Pazzano, Charles H. Jr. and 

Mary R 

Pearmain, William Robert 

Pearson, Theodore A. and Quint, 

Theodore A > 

Peavy, Leopold Jr 

Peck, Mildred E 

Pederson, Sarah A 

Peirce, Harriet T 

Peloquin, Roy J. and Alice M 

Pertzoff, Constantin A 500 

Pertzoff, Olga 



3,500 


168.00 


500 


24.00 


3,800 


182.40 


19,940 


957.12 




19.20 


35,000 


1,680.00 


7,850 


376.80 


7,000 


336.00 


250 


12.00 


3,800 


182.40 


8,000 


384.00 


200 


9.60 


4,500 


216.00 


4,600 


220.80 


7,500 


360.00 


1,350 


64.80 




16.80 


6,000 


288.00 


6,900 


331.20 


5,000 


240.00 



1,750 



84.00 



2,300 


110.40 


6,600 


316.80 


400 


19.20 


250 


12.00 


1,700 


81.60 


2,500 


120.00 


1,350 


64.80 


3,850 


184.80 


1,100 


52.80 


4,200 


201.60 


4,300 


206.40 




24.00 


9,600 


460.80 



134 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Pertzoff, Constantin A. and Olga 
Peterson, Frank W. and Mary E. 
Peterson, John R. and 

Mary Virginia ~ 

Peterson, Roy C 

Phillips, Henry B. and 

Charlotte T 

Pierce, Charles Eliot and 

Dora Red way 

Poinier, Donald and Roberta..- 

Poole, Ruth E. and Frederick 

Poor, Jane H. and Fitch, 

Marion A ~ 

Potter, Howard L. and 

Barbara V. .. 

Powers, William C. and Clara E. 

Preston, Jean W 

Preston, William M. — 

Pellandini, Robert T. and 

Virginia ~ 

Prouty, C. Newton 

Primak, John — - 

Primak, John and Lena 



Quarton, Gardner and Frances. 



Ragan, Ralph R. and Ruth M. ... 

Rand, Lucy K „ - 

Rand, William - - 

Rando, Giovanina - - 

Rando, Thomas — -. 

Read, Kenneth C. and 

Margaret M 

Ricci, Joseph, Louis, Fred 

and Charles ~ 

Rice, Arthur W. Jr. and 

Pauline K 

Rice, Earl S. and Naoma F 

Rice, James F. Jr. and 

Barbara A - 

Rice, Richard B. and Grace W. , 

Rice, Warren A. and Ruth H 

Rice, Warren .. 



38,740 
4,100 

1,000 
3,300 

16,450 



12,500 



1,859.52 
196.80 

48.00 
158.40 

789.60 



12,500 


600.00 


4,900 


235.20 


9.700 


465.60 



600.00 





6,000 


288.00 




6,000 


288.00 




24,000 


1,152.00 


100 




4.80 




4,700 


225.60 




1,000 


48.00 


735 




35.28 




10,200 


489.60 




15,030 


721.44 




5,000 


240.00 




21,500 


1,032.00 


500 




24.00 




4,850 


232.80 


800 




38.40 




7,100 


340.80 




5,050 


242.40 




12,200 


585.60 




6,000 


288.00 


13 


3,400 


163.82 




4,200 


201.60 


750 


9,100 


436.80 
84.00 



VALUATION LIST 



135 





Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 



Richardson, Howard C 

Richardson, Lyle „ 

Riley, Allston and Marion 

Riley, William B. and Mary M. 
Robbins, Roland W. and 

Geraldine _ 

Roberti, Norbert F 

Robey, A. Alexander and 

Harriet Stevens 

Robichaud, George V. and Emma 

Robichaud, George V « 

Robinson, Dora J 

Robus, Tamzin K „ 

Rodiman, Mildred M 

Rogers, Edward H .. 525 

Rogers, John H 

Rollins, Elmer A 

Rood, Allan and Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. and 

Elizabeth M 

Rooney, John J. and Margaret C. 
Rooney, Leonard A. and 

Helen L „ 

Root, Harriet E 

Root, Lily Frederica 

Ross, William C. and Marion L. 

Rouner, Thomas J, 625 

Rouner, Thomas J. and Doris J. 
Rowe, Lawrence L. and 

Mildred M. 

Rowe, Standish S .. - 

Rudzki, Jan A. and Mary 

Rufo, John and Helen L 

Russes, Frances - 

Ryan, Anastasia, Heirs of 

Ryan, Frank A ~ ~ 

Ryan, James ~ 100 

Ryan, James J. and Helen 

Ryan, Lawrence ~ 

Ryan, Mary J - - 

Sagendorph, George A. and 
Jane H 



200 


9.60 


13,000 


624.00 


10,400 


499.20 


1,900 


91.20 


3,000 


144.00 


4,250 


204.00 


10,600 


508.80 


5,000 


240.00 


7,000 


336.00 


3,500 


168.00 


2,500 


120.00 


1,000 


48.00 


19,000 


938.88 


7,000 


336.00 


800 


38.40 


6,400 


307.20 


5,300 


254.40 


1,500 


72.00 


3,000 


144.00 


600 


28.80 


3,350 


160.80 


10,200 


489.60 




30.00 


8,250 


396.00 


1,700 


81.60 


5,500 


264.00 


4,150 


199.20 


400 


19.20 


2,900 


139.20 


2,400 


115.20 


100 


4.80 




4.80 


3,000 


144.00 


3,500 


168.00 


4,000 


192.00 



16,000 



768.00 



136 



STATISTICAL 





Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 



Santangelo, Laura B. and John 

Sawtel, Clement C. and 

Adeaide I -. 

Schaal, Albert A. and Zelpha M. 

Schlaifer, Robert 0. 

Schoales, Gilbert C 100 

Schumacher, August ..... 

Schmacher, August and Mary L. 

Schwann, William and Sonya 

Scott, Gordon and Beatrice V. ... 

Scott, Herman H 

Scott, Robert W „ „ 400 

Sears, Ann 

Secora, Julia 

Seeckts, E. William „ 

Seeckts, Marion E. and 

Ehlert W 

Segadelli, Doris C. and John J. 

Sexton, Maurice S „ 

Shank, Maurice E. and Virginia... 

Shaw, Alice DeS „ 

Shea, Catherine E., Est. of 

Shepard, Paul F 

Sherman, Daniel E 

Sherman, D. Everett, Jr 1,175 

Sherwin, Edward V 

Shumway, Herbert L, and 

Violet A 

Siler, William C. and 

Barbara Jean 

Silva, Manuel, Heirs of 

Silva, Mary 13,130 

Simonds, Anthony J. and Lena J. 

Simms, Mildred A 

Sisson, John H. and Barbara 

Small, William A. and Dolina N. 
Smith, Carl D. and Florence C. 

Smith, John E. and Helen M 

Smith, Sumner 2,150 

Smith-Peterson, Helda D 

Smith, William B. and Mary W. 
Snelling, Caroline, Est, of 



350 



7,200 



16.80 



6,000 


288.00 


200 


9.60 


5,700 


273.60 




4.80 


1,110 


53.28 


1,000 


48.00 


7,450 


357.60 


8,700 


417.60 


7,500 


360.00 


24,700 


1,204.80 


1,000 


48.00 


3,000 


144.00 


6,500 


312.00 


4,000 


192.00 


500 


24.00 


600 


28.80 


5,500 


264.00 


20,000 


960.00 


4,500 


216.00 


4,650 


223.20 


9,800 


470.40 


5,250 


308.40 


1,500 


72.00 



345.60 



4,200 


201.60 


21,150 


1,015.20 




630.24 


5,300 


254.40 


1,700 


81.60 


10,800 


518.40 


6,200 


297.60 


5,500 


264.00 


5,000 


240.00 


55,700 


2,776.80 


2,150 


103.20 


3,900 


187.20 


4,500 


216.00 



VALUATION LIST 



137 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Snelling, Charles A 

Snelling, Dorothy R 

Snelling, Howard and Elizabeth... 
Snider, Joseph L. and Greta W. 

Sorenson, Hans, Heirs of 

Sorenson, J. Oscar 

Spence, Robert A. and Helen M. 
Spencer, Henry W. and 

Marguerite C 

Spooner, Frederick C. and 

Sarah W 

Spooner, Lily T. 

Sterner, John and Janine M 

Stevens, Kimball C. and 

Eleanor G „ 

Stevens, Robert R. and Nancy L. 
Stockellburg, Arthur A. and 

Jennie L .. 

Stone, Edith C „ 

Street, Earle B. and Janet H 

Stratford Realty Co. Inc 

Stuart, Edward T ~ 

Sturgis, Alanson H. Jr. and 

Anne H „ 

Sturm, Henry A. Jr. and 

Harriet W - - 

Sullivan, Winifred P 

Summerfield, John R. and 

Mary Anne 

Swan, Edmund and Eleanor C. ... 

Swanson, Alfred and Alma 

Swanson, Arthur W. and 

Helen K 

Swanson, John, Realty Corp 2,000 

Sweeney, Joseph E. and 

Jeanne M 

Swift, Orlando B 200 

Swift, Orlando B. and Janice B. 
Swift, William N. and Phyllis C. 
Swinconeck, John J 

Taillacq, Elise 



4,100 


196.80 


4,300 


206.40 


4,500 


216.00 


850 


40.80 


4,050 


194.40 


4,250 


204.00 


6,000 


288.00 



11,500 



552.00 



3,500 


168.00 


4,250 


204.00 


7,400 


355.20 


6,000 


288.00 


300 


14.40 


1,750 


84.00 


300 


14.40 


4,500 


216.00 


12,300 


590.40 


1,500 


72.00 


4,750 


228.00 


5,200 


249.60 


1,200 


57.60 


1,300 


62.40 


1,100 


52.80 


7,450 


357.60 


7,600 


364.80 


12,500 


696.00 


5,000 


240.00 




9.60 


8,650 


415.20 


8,600 


412.80 


1,600 


76.80 



4,000 



1912.00 



138 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Tarbell, George G. et al., 

Trustee 

Tarbell, George G. Jr 

Tarky, William J. Jr 

Taylor, Edward S. and 

Constance R. ...... 

Taylor, Phillip L. and Miriam H. 

Tasker, Eliza J 

Teabo, Eugene R. and Alice M. 

Tew, John B 

Thiessen, Arthur E. and Laura 

Thoma, Henry F. and Mary Alice 
Thompson, G. Brooks Jr. 

and Arlene — ~ 

Thorpe, Margaret M. 

Thorson, Robert H. and 

Kathryn F „ _ „ 

Todd, Catherine M „ 

Todd, Mabel H - 

Todd, Pauline E. Adm. u/w 

C. Lee Todd .. 

Toler, Louise C 

Tonseth, Didrick and Phebe — „ — 
Torode, Herbert L. and 

Lorraine S 

Townsend, John B. and Helen A. 

Tracey, Joseph 500 

Tracey, Elizabeth C .. 

Tracy, John W. and Gertrude G. 
Trenholm, Charles E. and 

Harriet M. .............. 

Troisi, Ferdinand L. and Mary G. 

Trull, Sybil Shaw Ex. „ 

Tyler, Ethel A. Admx. u/w 

Fred Tyler 

Umbrello, Francis and Virginia... 
Umbrello, Francis 4,975 

Vance, Jane K. 

Van Leer, Hans L „ 5,350 

Van Leer, Hans L. and Mary K. 
Van Wart, Walter L. and 

Mary A — — 



20,200 


969.60 


8,000 


384.00 


1,000 


48.00 


7,150 


343.20 


500 


24.00 


3,500 


168.00 


900 


43.20 


13,400 


643.20 


13,500 


648.00 


5,000 


240.00 


9,600 


460.80 


7,000 


336.00 


7,100 


340.80 


3,200 


153.60 


18,500 


888.00 


26,900 


1,291.20 


500 


24.00 


1,850 


88.80 


3,000 


144.00 


5,500 


264.00 




24.00 


8,300 


398.40 


2,830 


135.84 


725 


34.80 


1,900 


91.20 


200 


9.60 


2,700 


129.60 


8,950 


429;_6Q 




238.80 


18,700 


897.60 


900 


aoo.oo 


11,000 


528.00 



1,600 



76.80 



VALUATION LIST 



139 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Victor's Market .. 1,500 

Walker, Harry „ 

Waible, Wendell J. and 

Florence E - 

Walen, Roger S. and 

Constance M 

Wales, Andrew M. and Betty R. 

Wales, Isabel G .. 

Waller, Ervin S 

Ward, Henry DeC. and Janet G. 

Warner, Henrietta S , ....- 

Warner, Henry E 

Warner, John Burton and 

Barbara K .. „ 

Washburn, Mabel L. and 

Rachel W 

Watt, Norman and Martha E 

Webb, John F 

Webb, Rosella 

Weiner, Julius W. d/b as 

Wyner Realty Co 

Welch, Vernon F. and 

Leatrice J 

Weld, Anne S. and Frederick C. 
Wellman, Bertram and Cora B. 

lis, George and K. W 

Wescott, Arthur E. and E. Edna 
Westcott, Charles W. C. and 

Mary > 

Westcott, Vernon C. and 

Mary Alice .. 

Western Union Tel. & Tel 2,800 

Weston, Georgianna H 

Wheeler, Elizabeth F., Ann H., 

Mary L. and Ruth A. Gale .. 

White, Katherine S. and John W. 
White, Robert E. and Marion S. 
Whitney, Harold A. and 

Consuelo V .. 

Whittier, Charles F. and 

Ramona Calkins 



10,700 



4,600 



72.00 



350 


16.80 


5,700 


273.60 


4,000 


192.00 


11,500 


552.00 


14,800 


710.40 


500 


24.00 


12,000 


576.00 


9,500 


456.00 


19,550 


938.40 



513.60 



4,400 


211.20 


3,000 


144.00 


9,000 


432.00 


5,500 


264.00 



220.80 



500 


24.00 


10,500 


504.00 


4,300 


206.40 


8,200 


393.60 


500 


24.00 


3,500 


168.00 


5,700 


273.60 




134.40 


4,500 


216.00 


17,150 


823.20 


12,500 


600.00 


4,800 


230.40 


4,600 


220.80 


2,200 


105.60 



140 



STATISTICAL 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Name of Taxpayer 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Wilber, Harold T. and Inez E 

Wilbor, John S. and Anne F 

Wilbur, Richard P. &vA 

Charlotte W 

Wildes, Leland A. and Irene E. 

Wiley. G. Arnold and Helen 

Wilfert, Fred J. and Eleanor M. 
Wilfert, Walter A. and 

Eleanor A 

Wilfert. Walter A., Eleanor A., 

Fred J. and Eleanor M 

Wilke, Earle L. and Virginia A. 

Wilkins, James .. „ 

Wilkins, John H. and Aida S 

Wilkshire, Alice E 

Willard, Henry L. and Helen S. 

Williams, Edwin L. Jr 

Williamson, Elizabeth R 

Wilson, John Otis 

Wilson, Melvin S. and Eleanor F. 
Wilson, Montgomery S. and 

Mary Ann 

Wilson, William A. and 

Eleanor L 

Winchell, Guilbert 

Winchell, Guilbert and Evelyn 

Witham, Arthur B. and 

Margaret F 

Witherton, John R. and 

Elizabeth P 

Wood, Frank H. and Jeanne R. ... 

Wood, James and Lizzie 

Wood, James D. and Ruth E 

Woodland Trust 

Woods, Henry A. and Barbara R. 

Worcester, Alice E. and others 

Worthington, Thos, K. and 

Elizabeth C 

Young, Charlotte Wales „ 

Young, David B. and Cora S 

Zdanowski, John J. and Mary A. 
Ziegler, Elmer H. and Hilda M. ... 



400 



240 



4,450 


213.60 


5,500 


264.00 


4.600 


220.80 


5,500 


264.00 


10,250 


492.00 


5,400 


259.20 



200 



4,750 



9,200 



26,650 



3,100 



9.60 



600 


28.80 


4.600 


220.80 




19.20 


16.000 


768.00 


100 


4.80 


8.000 


384.00 


4.200 


201.60 


1,300 


62.40 


9.100 


436.80 


4,500 


216.00 



228.00 

441.60 

11.52 

1,279.20 

148.80 



5,800 


278.40 


8,200 


393.60 


4,500 


216.00 


4,500 


216.00 


420 


20.16 


6,500 


312.00 


2,000 


96.00 


5,250 


252.00 


3,850 


184.80 


3,150 


151.20 


4,580 


219.84 


5,100 


244.80 



CEMETERY FUNDS 141 

Perpetual Care Funds 



Funds deposited 
in Middlesex 
Institution for Savings 


Principal 


Income 

Accumulated 

in Pior 

Years 


1952 Care 

Paid in 

1953 


1953 
Income 


December 
31, 1953 
Balance 


Samuel Hartwell 


$300.00 


$28.46 


$6.00 


$8.10 


$330.56 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


79.50 


7.00 


9.36 


381.86 


Annie A. Ray- 


300.00 


83.44 




9.64 


393.08 


Maria L. Thompson 


500.00 


164.60 


6.00 


16.55 


675.15 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


86.35 


22.20 


14.18 


578.33 


Geo. F. Harrington 


100.00 


7.61 


2.50 


2.64 


107.75 


Francis Flint 


250.00 


95.70 


7.00 


8.50 


347.20 


Wm. W. Benjamin 


500.00 


211.77 


19.00 


17.41 


710.18 


Abijah Jones 


300.00 


16.62 


6.50 


7.79 


317.91 


Ellen F. Whitney 


100.00 


3.68 




2.60 


106.28 


E. H. Rogers 


250.00 


19.08 


6.50 


6.59 


269.17 


Ellen T. Trask 


200.00 


106.75 


2.75 


7.64 


311.64 


Thomas Huddleston 


200.00 


11.09 


6.00 


5.16 


210.25 


Joa Pacewicz 


400.00 


41.17 


4.50 


10.97 


447.64 


Mary Susan Rice 
Julia A. Bemis 


87.27 


12.71 




2.50 


102.48 


300.00 


9.88 


7.00 


7.60 


310.48 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


130.68 


5.65 


10.69 


435.72 


Elizabeth G. Chapin 


300.00 


69.57 


7.00 


9.11 


371.68 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


11.98 


4.00 


5.22 


213.20 


Agnes S. Brown 


300.00 


25.82 


5.50 


8.05 


328.37 


Lewis W.Woodworth 


150.00 


7.30 


4.50 


3.83 


156.63 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


13.66 




7.88 


321.54 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


16.22 


5.00 


7.82 


319.04 


Mary J. Scripture 


500.00 


23.46 


6.00 


13.01 


530.47 


Chas. P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


19.24 


5.50 


9.14 


372.88 


Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 


137.67 


5.00 


53.62 


2,186.29 


Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 


15.16 


5.50 


5.26 


214.92 


John H. Wilkins 


675.00 


58.32 


6.00 


18.29 


745.61 


L. B. and 












A. E. Thiessen 


500.00 


26.75 




13.23 


539.98 


Paul Dorian 


150.00 


5.75 




3.91 


159.66 


Raymond Haggerty 
Charles O. Preble 


150.00 


5.75 




3.91 


159.66 


100.00 
400.00 


2.12 




2.56 
5.01 


104.68 


George G. Tarbell 




405.01 


Funds deposited in 
Suffolk Savings Bank 












J. Waldo Smith 


300.00 


21.21 


5.50 


8.73 


324.44 


Charles S. Smith 


300.00 


23.68 


4.25 


8.83 


328.26 


Edward R. Farrar 


300.00 


11.90 


7.00 


8.43 


313.33 


Anne D. Pollard 


300.00 


9.85 


5.25 


8.42 


313.02 



$12,662.27 $1,614.50 $184.60 $352.18$14,444.35 



142 STATISTICAL 



Report of Commissioners of Trust Funds 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1953 $1,395.70 

Income received in 1953: 

U. S. A. bond interest $337.50 

Other bond interest 191.10 

Savings bank interest 168.45 

Annuity u/w John H. Pierce 3,000.00 

Rent of property for 1953 600.00 

Well-Child Clinic fees - 68.00 

Dental Clinic fees 642.05 

Donation from Salvation Army for 

Dental Clinic 200.00 5,207.10 

Refunds of payments made 376.05 

Bond interest used to amortize purchase 

premiums 1.40 

Withdrawn from Wakefield Savings 

Bank 1,979.56 

$8,959.81 

Payments per order of Selectmen: 

Hospital aid $2,608.72 

Medicines 128.43 

Doctors' bills 342.00 

Well-Child Clinic 455.00 

Dental Clinic 1,543.21 

Repairs to Pierce house 957.50 

Care of grounds... 150.00 

$6,184.86 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate 168.45 6,353.31 

Cash balance at December 3-1, 1953 $2,606.50 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1953 

Cash on hand $2,606.50 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 3,255.44 

Provident Institution for Savings 1,221.32 



TRUST FUNDS 143 

U. S. A. bonds, at cost: 

$11,000 Series "G" 2V 2 % due Sept. 1, 1956 ..... 11,000.00 

2,500 Series "G" 2V 2 % due Nov. 1, 1959 2,500.00 

8,500 Series "F" due April 1, 1958 „ 6,290.00 

2,000 Series "F" due March 1, 1960 1,480.00 

2,700 Series "F" due Dec. 1, 1960 1,998.00 

3,500 Series "F" due July 1, 196} 2,590.00 

$2,000 Southern Pacific R.R. Equip. Trust "Q" 

2 1 /i% due Oct. 1, 1954 1,981.29 

2,000 St. Louis San Francisco R.R. Equip Trust 

"I" 2 7 / 8 % due Aug. 1, 1955 - „ 2,002.77 

2,000 Baltimore & Ohio R.R. Equip. Trust "CC" 

3% due Sept. 1, 1961 .. 1,995.72 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 

1965 - - 1,000.00 



$39,919.04 



Note: Redemption value of U. S. A. bonds at December 31, 1953, 
exceeded cost by $980.90. 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1953 $ 75.00 

Income received in 1953 — interest - - 73.46 



$148.46 
Less savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 43.46 



Cash balance at December 31, 1953 $105.00 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1953 

Cash on deposit „. $ 105.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings „ h , «. 1,772.07 

$1,200 U. S. A. Series "G" 2V 2 % due Jan. 1, 1955...... 1,200.00 

$3,077.07 

Income accumulated to December 31, 1953 $1,852.02 

Principal 1,225.05 

$3,077.07 



144 STATISTICAL 

DECORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1953 .. $ 4.37 

Income received in 1953 

U. S. A. bond interest „ : $364.82 

Other bond interest. „...„ 148.34 

Savings bank interest „ 143.72 

Dividends „ 60.00 

$716.88 
Less interest paid on bonds purchased 2.63 714.25 

Bond interest credited to Principal to 

amortize purchase premiums 4.34 

Withdrawn from savings bank 983.26 

Proceeds of sale of 12/13ths share which 
with one full share was received as 
stock dividend from First National 
Bank of Boston ............ 47.56 



$1,753.78 



Safe deposit box rental .. 3.00 

Net income paid to Town of Lincoln.... 711.25 

Purchase of $1,000 Alabama Power Co. 

3V 2 % bond due 1972 „ „ 989.80 1,704.05 



Cash on hand at December 31, 1953 $49.73 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1953 

Cash on deposit. . — ~ $ 49.73 

Cambridge Savings Bank 2,791.52 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 762.27 

U. S. A. bonds, at cost: less amortization: 

$10,000 Series "G" 2V 2 % due April 1, 1958 10,000.00 

1,000 Series "G" 2%% due Nov. 1, 1959 1,000.00 

1,000 Treasury 2%% due March 15, 1970-65... 1,014.67 
2,000 Treasury Reg. 2%% due April 1, 

1980-75 „ 2,029.65 

Other bonds 

$1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3V 2 % due 1972 989.80 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 2%% due 1975 948.30 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio R.R. Equip. Trust 

"CC" 3% due 1961 „ 997.86 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 

1965 1,000.00 



TEUST FUNDS 145 

1,000 Southern Pacific R.R. Equip. Trust "Q" 

2^4% due Oct. 1954..... „ 990.65 

1,000 Western Maryland R.R. 4% due 1969 1,026.41 

26 shares First National Bank of Boston.... .... 1,400.65 



$25,001.50 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Cash Account 

1953 savings bank interest paid to General Funds 

of Town . ~ ... - $ 53.01 



Savings Bank Deposits December 3!, 1953 

Middlesex Institution for Savings ~ . $ 722.00 

Cambridge Savings Bank ... . 495.52 



$1,217.52 



CHARLES SUMNER SMITH SCHOOL 
AND PLAYGROUND FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1953 . . . $ 31.53 

Income received in 1953: 

Savings bank interest $ 180.30 

U. S. A. bond interest 937.50 

Other bond interest - - 378.01 

$1,495.81 
Less accrued interest paid on bonds 

purchased - • 40.69 1,455.12 

Bond interest credited to book value of 

bonds to amortize premiums 3.24 

Withdrawn from savings banks 6,007.36 



$7,497.25 



Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

Savings bank interest allowed to accu- 
mulate 117.74 



146 STATISTICAL 

Deposited in savings banks 681.25 

Bonds purchased: 

$2,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip, 
Trust "FF" S%% due Dec. 

1, 1967 1,883.26 

1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 

2%% due 1975 895.80 

2,000 Detroit Edison Co. 3% due 

1970 - 1,936.60 

2,000 Alabama Power Co. SV 3 % 

due 1972 1,979.60 7,497.25 



Cash and Securities at December 3 S , 1953 

Boston Five Cents Saving's Bank $2,204.63 

Middlesex Institution for Savings - 2,175.33 

U. S. A. bonds, at cost (see note) : 

$25,000 Series "F" due Sept. 1, 1955 .. ~ 18,500.00 

1,000 Series "F" due Nov. 1, 1956 740.00 

6,000 Series "F" due May 1, 1957 - 4,440.00 

700 Series "F" due Oct. 1, 1957 518.00 

1,200 Series "F" due Dec. 1, 1958 888.00 

9,000 Series "F" due June 1, 1959 6,660.00 

1,000 Series "F" due Oct. 1, 1959 „ 740.00 

1.375 Series "F" due Dec. 1, 1962 _ 1,017.50 

26,500 Series "G" 2%% due Oct. 1, 1954 26,500.00 

11,000 Series "G" 2%% due Sept. 1, 1956 11,000.00 

2,000 Alabama Power Co. 3V 2 % due 1972 1,979.60 

4,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 2%% due 

1975 - 3,742.81 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "CC" 

3% due 1961 997.86 

2,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "FF" 

3Vs due 1967 „ „ 1,883.26 

2,000 Detroit Edison Co. 3% due 1970 1,936.60 

2,000 Great Northern Rwy. Equip. Trust "M" 

2 7s % due 1960 - 2,002.99 

2,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 

1965 2,033.70 

2,000 Southern Pacific Rwy. 1st Mgt. 2%% 

due 1961 1,913.27 



$91,873.55 



Note: Redemption value of USA bonds at Dec. 31, 1953 was 
in excess of book value (cost) by $6,286.90. 



TRUST FUNDS 



147 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 
Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1953 , 

Interest income received in 1953 .. 



Payments per order Bemis Lecture Fund 
Trustees : 

Jan. 23 Lady Molly Huggins .. $200.00 

Feb. 13 Dr. Johh Nicholls Booth... 75.00 

March 6 Folktale Puppet Studio 100.00 

March 13 Max Gene Nohl 125.00 

Oct. 23 Gustav Grahn . 125.00 

Nov. 20 Ivan Sanderson 150.00 



Printing and postage 

Janitor service at lectures- 
Safe deposit box rental 



$775.00 

180.39 

19.80 

3.00 



Cash balance at December 31, 1953. 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1953 



Cash on deposit „ .. 

Middlesex Institution for Savings - 

U. S. A. bonds, at cost: 

$11,000 Series "G" 2V 2 % due April 1, 1956 

3,000 Series "G" 2V 2 % due April 1, 1957 

4,800 Series "G" 2V 2 % due May 1, 1957 - 

1,000 Series "G" 2V 2 % due Nov. 1, 1959 

$3,000 Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Gen'l 4% 1995 
Louisville & NashviUe RR, A K & C Div. 4% 

due 1955 .. - 

New England Power Co. 3 x i% due 1961 

Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 

1965 .. - - 

2,000 Southern Pacific RR Equip. Trust ",Q" 

2 % % due 1954 



3,000 

3,000 
1,000 



$579.43 
908.62 

$1,488.05 



978.19 



$509.86 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 509.86 
28.04 

11,000.00 
3,000.00 
4,800.00 
1,000.00 
3,000.00 

3,000.00 
3,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,981.29 

$32,319.19 

$ 497.86 
31,821.33 

$32,319.19 



148 STATISTICAL 

DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1953 .. $ 152.29 

Income received in 1953: 

Savings bank interest $ 5.64 

U. S. A. Series "G" bond interest 75.00 

Other bond interest 60.00 140.64 



$ 292.93 



Payments per order of Trust Fund 
Commissioners: 
July 4 celebration — 23rd Infantry 

Band $225.00 

July 4 celebration — badges and prices 25.50 250.50 



42.43 
Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 5.64 



Cash on hand at December 31, 1953 $ 36.79 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1953 

Cash on deposit „ $ 36.79 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 230.33 

$3,000 U. S. A. Series "G" 2V 2 % due Jan. 1, 1955... 3,000.00 
1,000 Baltimore & Ohio RR Equip. Trust "CC" 

3% due 1961 997.86 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 3% due 

1965 „ „ 1,000.00 



Accumulated income at December 31, 1953 $ 70.23 

Principal 5,194.75 

$5,264.98 



TRUST FUNDS 149 



LINCOLN LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1953 $ 611.02 

Income received in 1953: 

Julia A. Bemis Fund $ 18.11 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr Fund 1.81 

Codman Fund „ 11.96 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 3.22 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 6.32 

Hattie Hoar Howard Fund 2.60 

David W. Mann Fund 1.39 

John H. Pierce Fund 27.87 

George Russell Fund „ 11.00 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 49.63 

Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund 52.05 

George G. Tarbell Fund 78.65 

Constance Taylor Fund 1.00 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. Wheeler 

Fund „ „ 32.73 

General Library Funds «. 5.58 303.92 

Donations to establish new Library 
Trust Funds: 



Constance Taylor Fund - 




73.00 


Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 




352.00 


Withdrawn from savings banks: 






Julia A. Bemis Fund „ 




36.61 


Codman Fund 




3.98 


Hattie Hoar Howard Fund 


103.61 


David W Mann Furd 




55.80 


General Library Funds.. 


203.00 




$1,742.94 


Paid per order of Library Trustees: 






Part of cost of new furnace in- 






stallation, from: 






David W. Manh Fund 


$ 57.19 




Hattie Hoar Howard Fund., 


106.21 
208.58 




General Library Funds 




Codman Fund (from accumulated 






income) 


74.02 





$ 44600 



150 STATISTICAL 

To Town of Lincoln, for purchase of 

Library b o oks .. 

Book of the Month Club, Inc „ „ 

Safe deposit box rent „ „ 

Savings bank interest allowed to 

accumulate „ 

Constance Taylor and Robert L. De- 
Normandie funds deposited in 
savings banks 

Edith B. Farrar, Librarian, income from 
John H. Pierce Fund 

Cash balance at December 31, 1953 



400.00 

25.00 

3.00 

78.04 



425.00 

27.87 



1,404.91 



$338.03 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1953 



Julia A. Bemis Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 

Elizabeth and Leland Burr 
Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 

Codman Fund: 

U.S.A. Series "G" 2%'% 

due June 1, 1955 

Middlesex Institution for 
Savings 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund: 
Warren Institution for 

Savings ~ 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings ~ 

John H. Pierce Fund: 
U.S.A. Series "G" 2V 2 % 

due Jan. 1, 1955 

Middlesex Institution for 
Savings ~ 



Accumulated 

Income 

on Deposit 



$4.34 



3.22 



Principle 



70.00 

400.00 
74.59 



Total 



$684.05 $684.05 



352.00 

158.89 

1,000.00 
114.57 



74.34 

400.00 
74.59 



$ 474.59 $ 474.59 



355.22 

158.89 

,000.00 
114.57 



$ 1,114.57 $1,114.57 



TRUST FUNDS 151 

George Russell Fund: 

Middlesex Institution for 

Saving's 33.24 415.74 448.98 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund: 
U.S.A. Series "G" 2V 2 % 

due Jan. 1, 1955.. 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 74.41 930.00 1,004.41 



$ 1,930.00 $2,004.41 
Abbie J. Stearns Special Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 1,301.03 1,301.03 

George G. Tarbell Fund: 
U.S.A. Series "G" 2y 2 % 

due Jan. 1, 1955 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for 

Savings „ 11.04 138.38 149.42 

$ 3,138.38 $3,149.42 
Constance Taylor Fund: 
Warren Institution for 

Savings 1.00 73.00 74,00 

C. Edgar and Elizabeth S. 
Wheeler Fund: 
Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 98.86 1,235.46 1,334.32 

$226.11 $10,947.71 $11,173.82 
Accumulated income on hand 
in First National Bank of 
Boston 338.03 338.03 

$564.14 $10,947.71 $11,511.85 



152 STATISTICAL 



deCordova and Dana Museum and Park 

Financial Report 
for the Year 1953 

At the beginning- of 1953 the 

Directors had on hand $21,975.49 

During" the year 1953, Receipts and 

Expenditures were as follows : 

Received Expended 

Income from deCordova trusts $38,396.80 

Interest on Savings Banks 

Deposits - 483.40 

Memberships of Associates 2,630.20 



Contributions of Visitors 


407.90 




Sale of Property (chiefly fire- 




wood) .. „ 

Museum Services 


168.00 




109.35 




School, 1953: 






Adults, tuition and costs 


6,383.97 


6,986.39 


Children, materials fee and 






costs > „ 


4,494.35 


6,910.21 


Tuition for 1954, held for use 






in 1954 


1,420.00 




Concert, film, lecture admis- 






sions, costs 


2,054.70 


1,405.86 


Salaries and wages 




21,517.91 


Office Expenses, supplies and 






Maintenance ~ 




2,976.44 

3,610.40 

4,769.52 

550.22 


Utilities - ~ 




Insurance, taxes other financial 




Caretaker's Cottage ..,.., 

Publicity ~ 






1,805.97 


Museum exhibits, other special 






events .=.......= 


194.00 


1,734.14 


Outdoor Maintenance * 




441.81 


Cost of items held for sale. 




691.11 


Equipment and improvements... 
Subscriptions and memberships 




2,750.19 
191.11 




Total of receipts and 






expenditures ~ 


56,742.67 


56,341.30 


Excess of receipts, 1953 




401.37 


Therefore at the end of 1953, 




the Directors had on hand... 




22,376.86 



TRUST FUNDS 



153 



deCordova and Dona Museum and Park 

TREASURER'S REPORT 1953 



Last year's report indicates that $8,931.91 was made 
during the year. That figure requires some explanation. 

Knowing that in the third quarter of 1953 the Museum 
would have to begin paying off its indebtedness of 
$45,000.00 borrowed from principle to complete the altera- 
tions and that from now until 1965 a payment of 
$3,755.08 a year will be paid out of trust income to repay 
this loan, the Board of Directors set aside money to cover 
any unforseen major financial expenditures. They voted 
$2,100.00 to purchase funds and $3,000.00 to a deprecia- 
tion fund. The unexpended balance of approximately 
$3,800.00 in 1952 compares with a net balance of approxi- 
mately $400.00 for the year 1953. Because of this debt re- 
payment and increased operating expenditures, no money 
could be appropriated to either fund this year. 

Since the trust income is fixed, it becomes apparent 
that with the increased use of the museum and enlarged 
program, money must be raised if the museum is to 
continue to expand its services. 



154 FINANCE 

Finance Committee 
Recommended Budget for 1954 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town 
appropriate for general purposes the several separately 
numbered items detailed in the list attached hereto ag- 
gregating $393,915.76 plus the sum of $8,000.00 for the 
Reserve Fund, making a total of $401,915.76. 

This total sum compares with total expenditures of 
$356,812.42 in 1953 for similar general purposes which 
includes transfers from the Reserve Fund — an increase 
of $45,103.34, or 12.64 per cent. 

The Committee also recommends for the Water De- 
partment appropriations aggregating $26,606.25, the 
same to be taken from Water Department treasury. Al- 
though this total includes $3,261.25 for debt service, the 
total water budget is $3,460.67 less than last year's ex- 
penditures. 

The following is a summary of our 1954 recommenda- 
tions for general purposes based on the major categories, 
with the approximate percentage that each bears of the 
total, together with the dollar increase over last year's 
expenditures for the same categories: — 



Purpose Recommendation 

General Government ... $22,570, 
Protection of Persons 

and Property 28,995. 

Health and Sanitation 3,330. 

Highways 41,278. 

Aid to Citizens..... 19,750. 

Schools 203,483. 

Town Debt (Schools)... 41,995. 

Library 6,810. 

Recreation 2,183. 



% of 


Change from 1953 


Total 


Ex 


penditure 


5.73 


+ 


$6,676. 


7.37 


+ 


156. 


0.85 


+ 


292. 


10.48 


+ 


746. 


5.02 


— 


122. 


51.66 


+ 


27,969. 


10.66 


— 


577. 


1.73 


+ 


709. 


0.55 


— 


63. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 155 

Cemetery 



Town Debt (other 
than schools) ..... 



2,750. 


0.70 


+ 


191. 


. 12,635. 


3.22 


— 


786. 


8,111. 


2.03 


+ 


3,258. 



Total $393,915. 100% 37,103. 

Added for Reserve 

Fund 8,000. 

Total Recommended 

including Reserve $401,915. 

The increase requested for the Reserve Fund does not 
reflect any contemplated increase in expenditures, but 
is for the purpose of providing a more satisfactory 
insurance against the unforseen requirements that may 
arise from the $393,915. budget. 

The increase in General Government reflects a full 
year's charge for added personnel to assist the Select- 
men in handling the increased responsibilities. 

None of the remaining general purpose categories, 
except schools, shows an increase of more than $750. 

The total transfers from the Reserve Fund during the 
year were $3,844.60, which were used for the following 
purposes : 

Elm tree removal „ $1,637.38 

Fire Department 1,367.13 

Interest on bonds .. „ 432.67 

Ballfield ami Playground 203.53 

Town House 101.88 

Highways 69.01 

Treasurer 33.00 



$3,844.60 



Unexpended appropriations which accrued to surplus 
aggregated $30,297.86, of which $21,503.97 came from 
School account. The unexpended appropriations which 
carry over for future expenditure without reappropria- 
tion amounted to $14,580.12, as shown by the Treasurer's 
Report. 



156 FINANCE 

We recommend the use of $37,000. from free cash for 
all bond retirements in 1954, except for Water Works, 
and that the appropriation from the Reserve Fund and 
the State and County Share of Chapter 90 Maintenance 
also be taken therefrom. 

Assuming that the 1954 valuation list of the Town 
is $5,700,000 ($200,000 over 1953), each $5,700 appro- 
priated at the coming meeting will have an effect of about 
$1 in the tax rate. Its impact may be postponed by resort 
to borrowing or may be partially offset by State and 
Federal reimbursements. 

Substantial capital outlays in all phases of the Town's 
operation are in prospect. It is felt, therefore, that an 
orderly study and programming of long-term overall 
requirements for capital expenditures has become essen- 
tial for a reasonable approach to this problem. 

In our opinion the recommended appropriations are 
entirely adequate for carrying on the regular business 
of the Town for the year 1954. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. WINCHESTER DENIO, Chairman 
THOMAS L. ROUNER, Secretary 
PAUL L. NORTON 
WILLIAM N. PAGE 
CHARLES K. FITTS 

February 1, 1954. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



157 





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( Warrant for 1954 



NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meeting for 
the Transaction of Town affairs, to meet in the Town 
House in said Lincoln, on Monday the first day of March 
next at 7:30 o'clock P.M. then and there to act on the 
following articles except Article 1 and also to meet in 
said Town House on Saturday, the sixth day of March 
next, at 12 o'clock Noon, then and there to act on the 
following Article 1, by posting a copy of this Warrant, 
by you attested in each of the Post Offices, and in some 
other public place in said Town seven days at least before 
the first day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Saturday, 
March sixth will be open at 12 o'clock Noon, and may 
be closed at 7 o'clock P.M. 



168 WARRANT FOR 1954 

Article 1. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers and any other officers required by law, to 
be elected by Australian Ballot viz: 

One Moderator for three years. 

One Town Clerk for one year. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen for three years. 

One member of the Board of Assessors for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

One member of the School Committee for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners for 

three years. 
One member of the Board of Health for three years. 
One Tree Warden for one year. 
One member of the Trust Fund Commissioners for 

three years. 
One member of the Trustees of the Bemis Fund for 

Free Public Lectures for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 

for three years. 
One member of the Planning Board for live years. 
One Director for the deCordova and Dana Museum and 

Park for four years. 

and also the following questions: 

Shall the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 402 of 
the Acts of 1952, being "An Act restricting the use of 
lands abutting the highway known as Route 2 in the 
Towns of Lincoln and Concord",? as follows: 

Section 1. For the purpose of promoting the health, 
safety, convenience and welfare of the inhabitants of 
the commonwealth, the use of the land in the towns of 
Lincoln and Concord abutting the highway now known 
as Route 2, and extending back for two hundred feet 
from either side line of said highway, is hereby restricted 
to such uses as are lawfully permitted therein under the 



WARRANT FOR 1954 169 

respective zoning by-laws of said towns in effect imme- 
diately prior to the effective date of this act, such uses, 
however, to be subject to the restrictions of said by-laws. 
The restrictions in such by-laws in respect to the area 
of lots, frontage, the height and bulk of buildings, the 
set-back from the way fronted upon, and the width of 
side yards, and rear yards in force immediately prior to 
the effective date of this act, so far as applicable to the 
land to which this act relates, shall remain in full force 
and effect. 

Section 2. This act shall become effective upon its 
acceptance at annual town elections held in the towns 
of Lincoln and Concord prior to April thirtieth, nineteen 
hundred and fifty-four. 

Shall the Tov/n accept the provisions of sections 
sixteen to sixteen I, inclusive, of chapter seventy- 
one of the General Laws, providing for the establish- 
ment of a regional school district, together with the 
town of Sudbury and the construction, maintenance 
and operation of a regional school by the said district 
in accordance with the provisions of a proposed 
agreement filed with the selectmen? 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners,- trustees, and other officers, required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 

Article 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be 
authorized to employ for additional compensation any 
of its members and to fix additional compensation of 
such members. 

Selectmen 



170 WARRANT FOR 1954 

Article 5. To raise and appropriate money for the 
necessary and expedient purposes of the Town and en- 
act anything in relation to the same. 

Selectmen 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 
1954, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable with- 
in one year and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Selectmen 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to conduct 
services on Memorial Day, the thirtieth of May, appoint 
a committee, raise and appropriate money, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $974.30 to pay the following un- 
paid 1953 bills: 

Water Department $276.00 

School Department 323.55 

Legal 374.75 

Treasurer 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate additional funds for the use of the Bi-cen- 
tennial Committee, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money to purchase the following 

town vehicles to replace existing equipment: Police car, 

Highway truck, Water Department truck, or take any 

other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



WARRANT FOR 1954 171 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a motor 
driven street sweeper or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the installation of new 
alarm equipment for the use of the Fire Department 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue 
as a public highway that portion of the Old Bedford 
Road, beginning" at the Bedford-Lincoln town line and 
extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of 
about 2,100 feet to a point where said Old Bedford Road 
intersects with the substitute way constructed by the 
Federal Government, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Moderator to appoint a committee of five to investi- 
gate and study the effect on the Town of the development 
of Lawrence G. Hanscombe Field (Bedford Airport) and 
other facilities or operations related thereto; to report 
thereon with recommendations to the Selectmen and 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to take such action 
with reference thereto as the committee may determine 
to be in the interest of the Town including, but not lim- 
ited to, representing the Town at hearings of legislative 
bodies or governmental agencies; to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) for the 
use of said committee, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

By Petition. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Law by amending Section 11, Paragraph (d) 
as follows: 



172 WARRANT FOR 1954 

Change the period to a comma and add the following : 
"and shall also hear and decide requests for special 
permits to issue, subject to conditions and safe- 
guards imposed by the Board of Appeals, for tem- 
porary structures and uses which do not conform to 
the regulations herein prescribed, provided that no 
such permit shall be for longer than a three year 
period." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

By Petition. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) 
for use in mosquito control; the appropriation to be ex- 
pended to re-open mosquito control as provided for in 
Chapter 252 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

By Petition. 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to change 
the name of the street extending from Lexington Road 
to North Great Road, from Mill Street to Old Mill Road. 

By Petition. 

Articl 18. To see if the Town will vote to acquire by 
purchase, gift, eminent domain or any other way, a 
parcel of land located on Bedford Road, south west of 
the intersection of route 2 and Bedford Road, containing 
22,000 square feet more or less, raise and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor or take any action relative there- 
to. 

Selectmen 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be used by a Committee 
appointed by the Moderator to study further the build- 
ing needs of the Lincoln Schools, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

School Committee 



WARRANT FOR 1954 173 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,- 
000) , or any other sum, for the use of the Regional Dis- 
trict School Committee in the event that a Regional 
School District is established with the Town of Sudbury 
by vote of the Town of Sudbury and by vote of this Town 
on the related question in Article I of this Warrant; 
such sum to be made available to said Regional District 
School Committee, if and when created, only after a 
budget of such Committee has been approved by the 
Finance Committee and Selectmen of this Town and the 
Town of Sudbury, in accordance with provisions of a 
proposed agreement filed with the Selectmen, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to repeal the 
present Town By-Laws except the Zoning By-Law and 
the Building Code By-Law and adopt new "General By- 
Laws of the Town of Lincoln" as follows: 

"GENERAL BY-LAWS 
OF THE TOWN OF LINCOLN" 

AS REVISED AND ADOPTED MARCH 1, 1954 

ARTICLE I 

TOWN MEETINGS 
SECTION 1. 

The Annual Town Meeting shall be held on the first 
Monday after the fifteenth day of March in each 
year at 7:30 P.M., for the transaction of all business 
except that the election of such officers and the deter- 
mination of such matters as by law are required to be 
elected or determined by ballot shall take place on the 
following Saturday, when the polls shall be open from 
12 M. until 7 P.M. or to such later time up to 8 P.M. as 
the Town may by vote determine , 



174 WARRANT FOR 1954 

SECTION 2. 

Every Town Meeting shall be called in pursuance of 
a warrant under the hands of the Selectmen or a ma- 
jority of them stating the time and place of holding the 
same and the subjects to be acted upon, notice of which 
shall be given at least seven days before such meeting by 
a constable or other person to whom it is directed, who 
shall attest and post copies thereof in or on three or 
more buildings belonging to the Town or any three public 
places in the Town and make his return of service there- 
of to the Selectmen. 

SECTION 3. 

In connection with the call of any special meeting, the 
Selectmen shall send by mail or otherwise to each house- 
hold within the Town, at least seven days before the 
time appointed for such meeting, a notice of the time 
and place for the holding thereof and a general state- 
ment as to the subjects to be considered thereat but no 
failure to receive such notice shall invalidate any action 
taken at a meeting held pursuant to the call prescribed 
by section 2 of this article. 

SECTION 4 

Admission to the place of meeting or to a defined por- 
tion set aside for the holding thereof shall be open only 
to voters whose names appear on the check list which 
shall be used in the enforcement of this section. The 
Moderator shall enforce this section throughout each 
meeting. 

SECTION 5. 

All votes shall be taken in the first instance by voice 
vote unless otherwise provided by law. If the Moderator 
is in doubt as to the result of such voice vote, or if seven 
or more registered voters immediately question the an- 
nounced result thereof, the Moderator shall call for an- 
other vote to be taken, as he may decide, by standing 
vote, or by a division of the meeting, by the use of the 
check list or by ballot. 



WARRANT FOR 1954 175 

SECTION 6. 

When a question is before the Meeting, the following 
motions, to wit: 

To fix the time to which to adjourn, 

To lay on the table, 

For the previous question, by 2/3 vote, 

To postpone to a time certain, 

To commit, recommit or refer, 

To amend, 

To postpone indefinitely, 
shall be received and shall have precedence in the fore- 
going order; and the first three shall be decided without 
debate. 

SECTION 7. 

On proposed amendments involving sums of money, 
the larger or largest amount shall be put to the question 
first, and an affirmative vote thereon shall be a negative 
vote on any smaller amount. 

SECTION 8. 

When a report of a committee is placed in the hands 
of the Moderator, it shall be deemed to be properly before 
the meeting for its action thereon, and a vote to accept 
the same shall discharge the committee ; for the adoption 
of the recommendations of the committee, however, a 
specific vote shall be required. 

N ARTICLE II 
FINANCES 

SECTION 1. 

The Town Treasurer shall have the custody of all 
funds belonging to the Town, including trust funds, ex- 
cept funds for which other provision is made by law. 
He shall pay no money from the treasury except upon 
a warrant signed by a majority of the Selectmen, stating 
the account to which the same is chargeable. Such war- 
rant shall be sufficient authority to the Treasurer to pay 



176 WARRANT FOR 1954 

the same, and the payment thereof shall discharge him 
from all liability on account of the money so paid. 

SECTION 2. 

The Water Commissioners and all other boards, com- 
mittees and officers shall pay to the Town Treasurer on 
the first of each month, or at such earlier date or shorter 
interval as the By-Laws provide or as the Selectmen or 
the Treasurer may order, all sums collected by them to 
the custody of which the Treasurer is entitled. 

SECTION 3. 

All accounts, claims, bills, orders and payrolls growing 
out of an appropriation authorizing such commitment 
and expenditure by the Water Commissioners, by the 
School Committee, or by any committee, board, officer 
or other person, shall upon examination thereof and ap- 
proval in writing by a majority of such commissioners, 
committee or board or by the officer or person having 
charge of its expenditure, be transmitted to the Select- 
men for their examination and approval. 

SECTION 4. 

All items approved and transmitted to the Selectmen 
pursuant to the foregoing section 3, of this article, and 
all other accounts, claims, bills, orders and payrolls shall 
be examined by the Selectmen, and, if within the ap- 
propriation therefor and otherwise proper, shall be listed 
with the dates, amounts, payees and funds or appropria- 
tions from which the same are payable and be transferred 
to the Treasurer for payment as directed by their war- 
rants therefor. 

SECTION 5. 

No money except State and County taxes and principal 
and interest of Town notes or bonds shall be paid from 
the Town treasury except upon a warrant therefor signed 
by a majority of the Selectmen. 



WARRANT FOR 1954 177 

SECTION 6. 

The Treasurer shall file and safely keep all receipts, 
vouchers and cancelled obligations of the Town and shall 
have the custody of all deeds, contracts, insurance policies 
and other similar documents owned or held by the Town, 
and, except for fidelity bonds covering Town officers and 
employees, which shall be filed with the Selectmen, shall 
have custody of all bonds which run to the Town or any 
of its commissioners, committees or officers. 

SECTION 7. 

The Selectmen shall keep an appropriate record of the 
several appropriations voted by the Town, of the war- 
rants for payments issued by them under each, and of 
the warrants paid; a similar record of appropriations 
and approved warrants paid under each shall be kept by 
the Treasurer. The Selectmen shall not issue any war- 
rant for payment nor shall the Treasurer make any pay- 
ment which overdraws any appropriation except in such 
cases as the expenditure is permitted or required by law. 
The Selectmen and Treasurer respectively shall keep a 
record of all bonds, notes, script or other evidences of 
indebtedness signed or countersigned by them, 

SECTION 8. 

When the bills contracted or approved by any board, 
committee or officer, pursuant to a given appropriation, 
have exhausted the entire appropriation therefor, such 
board, committee or officer, shall incur no further ex- 
penditure thereunder except in such cases where such 
expenditure may be required or permitted by law; and 
it shall be the duty of each board, committee or officer 
before the close of the financial year to approve all ac- 
counts, claims, bills and payrolls chargeable to their ap- 
propriation . 

SECTION 9. 

There shall be a Finance Committee composed of five 
voters of the Town who shall serve without pay and shall 
not, while serving on said committee, hold any other 



178 WARRANT FOR 1954 

Town office, either elective or appointive. The Moderator 
shall, within thirty days after the adjournment of every 
Annual Town Meeting, appoint for a term of three years 
either two persons or one person as may be necessary to 
provide a committee of five members. The members of 
the Committee shall hold office until their successors are 
appointed and qualified, and any vacancy shall be filled 
by the remaining members of the Committee and the 
Moderator. The Committee shall choose a chairman and 
a secretary and shall prior to the Annual Town Meeting 
confer with the Selectmen and report on the annual 
budget, and may hold public hearings. The Committee 
shall consider all questions that require the expenditures 
of money and, to the extent they deem desirable, shall 
consult with all boards, committees or officers on their 
respective annual or special requests for appropriations. 
The Committee shall make reports and recommendations 
in the Annual Town Report or by special report on any 
question brought before the Town at a Town Meeting 
other than the Annual Town Meeting. 

SECTION 10. 

As soon as may be but in any event within the week 
following the dissolution or adjournment without day of 
any Town Meeting, the Town Clerk shall transmit to the 
Selectmen, to the Town Treasurer, to the Auditor and 
to the Assessors respectively, a certified copy of all votes 
appropriating money or authorizing the expenditure of 
money or otherwise affecting the finances of the Town, 
and within the same period the Town Clerk shall trans- 
mit to all other Town officers or committees a certified 
copy of any vote of the Town affecting their respective 
powers or duties. 

SECTION 11. 

There shall be an annual audit of the Town's accounts 
under the supervision of the Director of Accounts of the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation in accordance 
with the provisions of Section 35, Chapter 44, General 
Laws. 



WARRANT FOR 1954 179 

ARTICLE III 
TOWN SEAL 

SECTION h 

The design of the Town seal shall be: a circle, in the 
border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as a 
precinct ; in 1754 as a Town" ; in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a 
fleur-de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, 
and in the base of the shield a view of the present Town 
Hall ; crest, the old chestnut tree standing upon the com- 
mon in Lincoln; in saltire two shepherd's crooks; the 
device thereof being as follows: 




SECTION 2. 

All deeds and other legal documents made, given or 
entered into by the Town requiring a seal shall be sealed 
with the Town Seal, and signed in behalf of the Town 
by a majority of the Selectmen. 

SECTION 3. 

The Town Clerk shall have the custody of the Town 
Seal. 

ARTICLE IV 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

SECTION 1. 

The Selectmen shall have general direction and man- 
agement of the property and affairs of the Town in all 
matters not otherwise provided by the law of the Com- 
monwealth or by the By-Laws of the Town. 



180 WARRANT FOR 1954 

SECTION 2. 7 ... \ 

The Selectmen may compromise claims and suits to 
which the Town is a party, provided that they shall act 
upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the Town exceeds $200.00. 

SECTION 3. 

The Selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise voted 
by the Town, full authority as agents of the Town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the Town before any tribunal, to appear and 
represent or defend the Town before any tribunal in all 
suits and other proceedings against the Town or in which 
the Town has an interest, to employ counsel for the pur- 
pose aforesaid, and for other purposes when it may be 
expedient to do so, and to take all necessary and proper 
measures for the protection of the interests and rights 
of the Town. 

SECTION 4. 

If the Town shall, at any meeting called for the pur- 
pose, choose a committee on claims, such committee shall 
have and exercise exclusively all the powers and duties 
conferred upon the Selectmen by the two preceding sec- 
tions. 

SECTION 5. 

The Town Clerk shall keep a file of all Town reports, 
reports of all committees chosen by the Town, and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the Town 
which may come into his possession. It shall be the duty 
of the Town Clerk to see that all conveyances of real 
estate to the Town are properly recorded in the Registry 
of Deeds. 

SECTION 6. 

No officer or board of the Town shall make any contract 
on behalf of the Town in which such officer or any mem- 
ber of such board is directly or indirectly financially in- 
terested, except competitive contracts. 



WARRANT FOR 1954 181 

SECTION 7. 

The Commissioners of Trust Funds shall act as the 
Grammar School Fund Trustees. 

SECTION 8. 

No Town officer, board, department or committee hav- 
ing the matter in charge shall (1) execute any contract 
involving an estimated expenditure of $1,000 or more 
for labor, equipment, materials or supplies, or any com- 
bination of same, or (2) otherwise purchase from a 
single supplier at one time any property having an esti- 
mated aggregate value of $1,000 or more, without either 
inviting proposals therefor from two or more reliable 
parties regularly engaged in performing similar contracts 
and supplying similar requirements ; or as an alternative 
to the foregoing procedure inviting proposals by public 
advertisement published in Middlesex or Suffolk County 
inviting bids therefor, reserving the right to reject any 
and all proposals. If the first method is used but no pro- 
posals are received, the second method shall be used. No 
contract nor bid shall be split, separated or divided, for 
the purpose of avoiding this By-Law, by reducing the 
amount below $1,000. This section shall not apply to 
purchase of materials in connection with work to be per- 
formed under Chapters 81 or 90 under specifications of, 
and at prices established by, the State Department of 
Public Works. 



ARTICLE V 
RECORDS 
SECTION 1. 

Books, records and laws received by the Town from 
the Commonwealth shall be deposited in the Public Li- 
brary. 

SECTION 2. 

It shall be the duty of the Town officer by whom any 
book mentioned in the preceding section is received to 



182 WARRANT FOR 1954 

cause the same to be at once deposited in the Public 
Library. 

SECTION 3. 

Such books may be used by the inhabitants of the 
Town within the Library and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the Librarian for a period not 
exceeding four days at any one time for use in any Town 
meeting, or by or before any committee or official of 
the Town. 

ARTICLE VI 

REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS BY THE TOWN 

SECTION 1. 

The annual reports of the Town officers, boards and 
committees shall be prepared and submitted to the Select- 
men in form suitable for printing on or before the first 
day of February in each year. 

SECTION 2. 

The Selectmen shall cause to be printed an annual 
Town report which shall contain, in addition to the re- 
ports of officers, boards and committees, a detailed re- 
port for the next preceding financial year of all moneys 
received into and paid out of the Town treasury during 
such year, showing separately payments made from loans 
as capital outlays for permanent improvements; the re- 
port of the Collector of Taxes of receipts, payments and 
abatements; statements of all funds belonging to the 
Town or held for the benefit of its inhabitants ; a state- 
ment of the liabilities of the Town, as of the year end, 
on bonds, notes, certificates of indebtedness or otherwise 
and of indebtedness authorized but not incurred and the 
purposes thereof; a copy of the records of Town meet- 
ings; a statement of all devises, bequests and donations 
to the Town ; and such other matters as said report is re- 
quired by law to contain or as may be inserted by the 
Selectmen, under the discretion granted to them by law. 



WARRANT FOR 1954 183 

SECTION 3. 

The Selectmen shall cause the annual report to be 
distributed to each household in the Town ten days at 
least before the Annual Meeting. 

SECTION 4. 

The Selectmen shall from time to time cause to be 
printed copies of the General and other By-Laws of the 
Town, and of the Rules or Regulations adopted by any 
officer, board or committee and shall periodically publish 
a list of the laws of the Commonwealth applicable to the 
Town soley by virtue of the acceptance thereof by the 
Town, and such printing or publication may be separate 
or as part of an annual Town report. 



ARTICLE VII 
WATER DEPARTMENT 

SECTION 1. 

No extension of water mains which involves the ex- 
penditure of any funds of the Town shall be undertaken 
unless expressly authorized by a vote of the Town. 

SECTION 2. 

The Water Commissioners may appoint one or more 
Registrars who shall, as directed by the Commissioners, 
take and tabulate a complete census of all water fixtures 
connected with the Town Water System, read and record 
all service meters at such intervals as the Commissioners 
may direct, and perform any other duties required by 
the Commissioners. 

SECTION 3. 

The Water Commissioners shall regularly transmit the 
assessments for water rates to the Collector of Taxes, 
who shall collect the same and turn the proceeds over to 
the Town Treasurer weekly. 



184 WARRANT FOR 1954 

SECTION 4. 

A charge of not less than two dollars shall be made 
whenever the Water Commissioners, or their represen- 
tatives, at the request of a water taker turn on or shut 
off the water in any service pipe. 

SECTION 5. 

Water rates shall be payable to the Collector the first 
day of March and the first day of September in each year, 
or as the Water Commissioners may determine. 

SECTION 6. 

No tap for service shall be made unless approved by 
the Board of Water Commissioners, who may require the 
payment of a suitable fee before allowing the tap. 

SECTION 7. 

No alteration shall be made in any of the pipes or 
fixtures installed by the Town except by persons au- 
thorized by the Water Commissioners who shall also be 
allowed to enter the premises, examine the fixtures, read 
the meters and ascertain if there is any unnecessary 
waste. 

SECTION 8. 

If any person shall open a hydrant or remove the cover 
thereof or make any opening or connection with any 
pipe or turn on or off the water from any pipe (not upon 
his own premises) except in case of fire or by authority 
of the Water Commissioners, he shall be liable to a fine 
or not more than twenty dollars. 

SECTION 9. 

Upon the non-payment of water rates and charges 
within sixty days after their due date, said water rates 
and charges shall be a lien upon the real estate to which 
the connection with the Town Water System was made. 
Notwithstanding the authority to establish such lien, 
such overdue rates and charges may be collected through 
any legal means, including the shutting off of water, 



WARRANT FOR 1954 185 

which may be deemed advisable. Chapter 40 of the Gen- 
eral Laws, as amended by Chapter 415 Acts of 1938, 
shall apply in all cases of non-payment of all water rates, 
charges, interest, etc. 

SECTION 10. 

The Board of Water Commissioners may make abate- 
ments in the water rates in such cases as the Commis- 
sioners may deem proper, and may temporarily shut off 
water from any street after giving notice of their inten- 
tion so to do. 

SECTION 11. 

The Board of Water Commissioners shall keep suit- 
able records in which shall be entered the names of all 
water-takers and the amounts charged, and these records 
shall be open to inspection. 

SECTION 12. 

The Water Commissioners may make such rules and 
regulations for the management and control of the busi- 
ness of the Water Department as they deem judicious, 
not inconsistent with the By-Laws of the Town or the 
laws of the Commonwealth. 



ARTICLE VIII 

MISCELLANEOUS 

SECTION 1. 

No person shall fire or discharge any firearms or ex- 
plosives of any kind within the limits of any highway, 
park, or other public property, or on any private prop- 
erty except with the consent of the owner or legal occu- 
pant thereof, provided, however, that this by-law shall 
not apply to the lawful defense of life or property nor 
to any law enforcement officer acting in the performance 
of his duties. Any person violating this by-law shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than twenty dollars. 



186 WARRANT FOR 1954 

ARTICLE IX 
SECTION 1. 

These by-laws shall be known as "General By-Laws 
of the Town of Lincoln" and the Zoning By-Law and the 
former Article bearing the caption of Article IX shall 
not form a part hereof but shall be separately identified 
as the "Zoning By-Law" and as the "Building Code By- 
Law". 

ARTICLE X 
REPEAL 
SECTION 1. 

All by-laws or parts of by-laws heretofore in effect 
which are inconsistent with the provisions of the fore- 
going General By-Laws, except the Zoning By-Law and 
the Building Code By-Law are hereby repealed and an- 
nulled; but the provisions of the foregoing by-laws so 
far as they are the same as the provisions of by-laws 
heretofore adopted, shall be construed as in continuation 
of such provisions and not as new enactments. 

SECTION 2. 

The repeal of a by-law heretofore adopted shall not 
affect any act done, ratified or confirmed, or any right 
accrued or established, nor any action, suit or proceeding 
commenced or had, nor affect any punishment, penalty or 
forfeiture incurred under such by-law." 

or take any action relative thereto. 
By-Law Committee 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before 
the time for the meeting aforesaid. Given under our 
hands this 15th day of February in the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and fifty-four. 

EDMUND W. GILES 
HENRY DeC. WARD 
JOHN 0. WILSON 
Selectmen of Lincoln 



Jvepori 



of the Officers and Committees 



of the 



Csown of bincoln 



FOR THE YEAR 1954 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS. 



Calendai 



SELECTMEN — Second and fourth Mondays of each month 8 P.M. 
at the Town House. Clearwater 9-8882 • 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — First Tuesday of each month 8 P.M. at the 

Charles. Sumner Smith School. Clearwater 9-8333. 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS — First Wednesday of each month 8 P.M. at 
the Town House. Clearwater 9-8882. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS — Meetings by appointment, call Sumner 
Smith. Clearwater 9-8213. 

BOARD OF HEALTH — Meetings by appointment, call Dr. Gordon 
Donaldson. Clearwater 9-8192. 

BOARD OF APPEALS — Meetings by appointment, call Town House. 
Clearwater 9-8882. 

PLANNING BOARD — Second Wednesday of each month 8 P.M. 
Town House. Clearwater 9-8882. 

Population — 2,339 by 1950 census. 

Town Area — 8,572 acres. 

195U Tax Rate — SW.OO per §1,000 valuation. 

Annual Town Meeting — First Monday in March after the fifteenth - 
March 21, 1955. 

Annual Election of Town Officers - Saturday following Town 
Meeting — March 26, 1955* 

Qualifications for Registration - Twelve months continuous resi- 
dence in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts prior 
to March 21, 1955* and six months continuous resi- 
dence in the Town of Lincoln prior to March 21, 1955 • 

Town Office Open daily 9:00 A.M. to U:30 P.M., Saturday 9:00 A.M 

to 12 noon. Closed Saturdays during June, July and 
August . 



Town Dump — Wednesdays 1:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. Saturdays 9:00 A.M. 
to 7:00 P.M. Sundays 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 

(Telephone numbers indicated will be in effect May 1, 1955.) 



Cyontents 



TOM* CALENDAR 

TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Officers and Committees 

Selectmen 

Town Clerk 

Town Meetings 

Elections . . - 

Licenses •••• 

FINANCE 

Auditors •••••.•..... 
Treasurer 

Collector of Taxes ...•••. 
Assessors 

Trust Fund Commissioners • • » • 
Finan.ce Committee Recommendations 

PROTECTION 

Police Department •••.»•••• 
Fire Engineers •••• 

Fire House Site Committee • • • • 

Inspector of Animals • 

Tree Warden •••-••••••• 

Civil Defense Agency •••••• 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health .••....•• 
Nursing Committee ••••»»•.» 

Public Assistance Agent • » • » • 

Mosquito Control Committee . - .. 
Bedford Airport Committee . . • . 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals ••»•••»• 

Water Commissioners ••»»••• 
Superintendent of Streets • . • • 
Inspectors 

Cemetery Commissioners 



Regional School Committee 82 

School Building Committees 8U 

School Land Committee • • 85 

EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Library Trustees ••• 86 

Bemis Free Lectures 88 

Middlesex County Extension Service • ♦ 89 

Bicentennial Committee 90 

Recreation Committee • . . . ♦ 96 

deCordova and Dana Museum and Park ••••••••• 97 

School Committee . • 101 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 116 

Valuation List . 131 

Trust Funds 138 

Fire Calls 1U7 

WARRANT FOR 1955 157 



OFFICERS AND C01MITTEES 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR Term Expires 

Donald P. Donaldson " 1955 

TOWN CLERK 

William H. Davis 1955 

SELECTMEN AND BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

John 0. Wilson, Chairman 1955 

Edmund W. Giles 1956 

Henry DeC. Ward 1957 

ASSESSORS 

George G. Tarbell, Jr., Chairman 1956 

Arthur W. Rice • 1957 

G. Arnold Wiley 1955 

TREASURER 

Frederick B. Taylor 1955 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

William H. Davis 1956 

AUDITOR 

Louis C. Farley, Jr . 1955 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John VJ. Carman, Chairman 1956 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 1957 

Ernest P. Neumann 1955 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Sumner Smith, Chairman • 1956 

Edward S. Taylor 1957 

Henry Warner 1955 

TREE WARDEN 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr 1955 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Gordon A. Donaldson, Chairman 1955 

Warren F. Flint 1956 

Ellen DeN. Cannon 1957 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS Term Expires 

George E. Cunningham, Chairman • • 1956 

Robert D. Donaldson 1957 

James B. Billings (Resigned) 1955 

H. Arnold MacLean (Appointed) » 1955 

PLANNING BOAHD 

Richard J. Eaton, Chairman 1956 

Arthur T. Howard, Clerk 1957 

Howard Snelling 1955 

Everett A. Black 1958 

Alan McClennen 1959 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 

Clifford J. Bradley 1955 

Joseph R. Tracey 1955 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Clement C. Sawtell, Chairman 1955 

William DeFord 1956 

William T. King 1957 

TRUSTEES OF BMLS FUND FOR FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Christopher W. Hurd, Chairman 1955 

Mabel H. Todd 1956 

Leonard C. Larrabee 1957 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Roland C. MacKenzie, Chairman 

George G. Tarbell 

Alice G. Meriam 

John 0. Wilson, Chairman Selectmen ex-officio .... 
John W. Carman, Chairman School Committee ex-officio 

deCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

A. Directors 

John Q. Adams 1956 

Charles H. Blake 1957 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1958 

Jane K. Vance 1955 

B. Directors 

Richard S. Meriam - appointed by Library Trustees • 1955 

Arthur E. Thiessen - appointed by Selectmen 1957 

Helen Wiley - appointed by School Committee 1956 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



OFFICERS AMD COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Term Expires 
Leslie M. Willard " 1955 

CLERK OF SELECTMEN AND PUBLIC WELFARE AGENT 
M. Elizabeth Causer 1955 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Clifford H. Bradley 1955 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Leo J. Algeo .. 1955 

POLICE OFFICERS 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1955 

James J. Diamond 1955 

CONSTABLES 

Leo J. Algeo 1955 

Lawrence P. Hallett 1955 

John J. Kelliher 1955 

George E. Cunningham • • • • • . 1955 

DOG OFFICERS 

Leo J. Algeo ... 1955 

Lawrence P. Hallett .... 1955 

James J. Diamond 1955 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Orrin C. Wood 1955 

SPECIAL POLICE 

John T. Algeo Harry B. Knowles, Jr. 

Bob Berason Harry B. Knowles, 3rd 

Robert H. Booth Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 

Floriy Campobasso Karl F. Lahnstein 

Joseph Campobasso Edward D. Rooney 

John Cook Carl Smith 

Joseph Cotoni Francis J. Smith 

Henry J. Davis Sumner Smith 

James DeNormandie David Spooner 

William Doherty Henry Warner 

Francis T. Gilbert Leslie M. Willard 

John Gilbert Orrin C. Wood 



TCMJ GOVERNMENT 



FIRE ENGINEERS Term Expires 

Andrew J. Dougherty ~ 1955 

Frank W. Gordon 1955 

William M. Dean . .- 1955 

FOREST WARDEN 

Andrew J, Dougherty 1955 

DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN 

Frank W. Gordon . . . . » 1955 

MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 

Daniel A. Mac Innis, Jr 1955 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 

Andrew J. Dougherty 1955 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Eveleth R. Todd . 1955 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Walter Bergquist 1955 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Daniel J. Murphy 1955 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

William Dean ► 1955 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 1956 

James DeNormandie (Resigned) 1955 

Elmer H. Ziegler (Appointed) * 1955 

Henry B. Hoover .. 1958 

John White 1957 

Thomas B. Adams 1959 

William Dean, Associate Member • 1955 

Hans Van Leer, Associate Member • ••* 1956 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Manley B. Boyce 1955 

Andrew J. Dougherty - ►.. • 1956 

Henry J. Davis 1957 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk ex-of ficio 1955 



OFFICERS AMD COMMITTEES 



BUREAU OF OLD AGE ASSISTANCE Term Expires 

M. Elizabeth Causer 1955 

Marian N„ Ober 1955 

John J. Kelliher 1955 

MEMBER OF DISTRICT NURSING COMMITTEE 

Alberta A. Fradd (Resigned) 1955 

Louise H. McClennen (Appointed) 1955 

FENCE VIEWERS 

George G. Tarbell 1955 

John J. Kelliher ... 1955 

FIELD DRIVERS 

Joseph Campobasso 1955 

Sherman Davis 1955 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Ethan Murphy, Chairman 1955 

John W. Carman *.►... 1955 

Astrid L. Donaldson '■+ • 1955 

Norman Fradd , 1955 

John B. Garrison •....- •»•»...• 1955 

Edward D. Rooney ...... . . . . 1955 

Sadie J. Sherman »...••... 1955 

David Todd ........* 1955 

SURVEYOR OF CORD WOOD 

Clifford Bradley 1955 

VETERANS' AGENT 

Edmund W. Giles 1955 

CARETAKER OF TOWN HALL 

Orrin C. Wood 1955 



Name 
Lawrence B. Anderson 
Richard 3. Ayer 
Theodore C. Baker 
John M. Barnaby 
Walter B. Belanger 
Robert P„ Brown 
John J* Connair 
Charles E. Crane 
Gilmore B. Creelman, 
D. Bradford Davis 
Murray P. Farnsworth 



JURY LIST, 195U 
Residence 
Beaver Pond Road 
South Great Road 
Baker Bridge Road 
Concord Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
Page Road 
Lincoln Road 
Weston Road 
Jr. South Great Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Lincoln Road 

5 



Occupation 
Architect 
Engineer 
Asst. Manager 
Coach 
Engineer 
Architect 
Retired 

Ind. Real Estate 
Bank Teller 
Printer 
Salesman 



TO&JN GOVERNMENT 



Name 
Richard C. Fleck 
William L. Grinnell 
Stanley Heck 
Gerard C. Henderson 
Kenneth ¥. Hess 
Towns end Hornor 
Leonard C. Larrabee 
Edward S. Mullins 
Robert L» Niles 
Elliott F. Page 
Frederick P. Walkey 
John G. Webb 
G. Arnold Wiley 
Guilbert Winchell 

Appointed June lUth, 195U< 



Residence 
Sandy Pond Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Bedford Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Tower Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Bedford Road 
Weston Road 
Blueberry Lane 
Beaver Pond Road 
South Great Road 
Weston Road 
Lexington Road 
Concord Road 



Occupation 
Investment Officer 
District Manager 
Purchasing Agent 
Advertising 
Executive 
Banker 

Treasurer's Office 
Art Teacher 
Salesman 
Engineer 
Museum Director 
Banker 
Engineer 
Retired 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 



M. Elizabeth Causer 



Term Expires 
1955 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

COMMUNITY NURSE 
Marian N. Cfoer 195$ 

BURIAL AGENT 
William H. Davis .♦« 1955 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Andrew J. Dougherty . .... o 1955 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

F. Winchester Denio, Chairman . * 1957 

Thomas J. Rouner, Secretary . • 1956 

William N. Page 1955 

Paul L. Norton 1956 

Charles K. Fitts • 1957 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE Term Expires 

David B . Spooner " 1955 

Gladys de Y. Herman 1955 

Rev. Rollin J. Fairbanks 1955 

James V. Lennon 1955 

Louis E. Paddock 1955 

BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 
Norman F. Brisson William M. Dean 

Robert Bygrave Manning W. MacRae 

Henry B. Hoover 

REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Malcolm L. Donaldson Victor A. Lutnicki 

William A. Wilson 
(The other members of this committee, appointed by the Sudbury 
Moderator, are Luther M. Child, Robert S. Childs and John Woods) 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Andrew J. Dougherty Stanley Heck 

Elliott V, Grabill Elizabeth J. Snelling 

James DeNormandie 

200th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 
Edith B. Farrar E. Donlan Rooney 

Warren F. Flint Alice W. Smith 

Frederick H. Greene, Jr. 

SCHOOL LAND COMMITTEE 
Andrew J. Dougherty Stanley Heck 

Elliott V. Grabill Elizabeth J. Snelling 



COMMITTEE ON SITES FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT HOUSING 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Chief of Fire Engineers 
Richard J. Eaton, Chairman of Planning Board 
S. Leonard Arnold 
Henry M. Morgan 
Russell L. Haden, Jr. 

BEDFORD AIRPORT COMMITTEE 
Thomas B. Adams Walter E. Belanger 

Calvin P. Bartlett Richard J. Eaton 

Katharine S. White 



TOl-M GOVERNMENT 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 
Andrew J. Dougherty Stanley Heck 

Elliott V. Grabill Ernest P. Neumann 

Elizabeth J # Snelling 



Charles H. Blake 



MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMITTEE 

John B. Tew 
Barbara K. Warner 



APPOINTED BY THE CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
MEMBERS OF AUXILIARY POLICE FORCE 



Walter Belanger 
Robert Booth 
Walter Bonia 
Sheldon A, Briggs 
Secor Browne 
Stanley Cibel 
Robert C. Day 
Richard J, Eaton 
Warren F. Flint 
Howard W. Foote 
Donald A. Gilfoy 
Lowell Hollings worth 
Eliot Hubbard, 3rd 
Medford E. Huntley 
Ernest L. Johnson 
David W. Kirkpatrick 
Harry B. Knowles, Jr, 
Harold Laws on 
H. Arnold MacLean 



James W. Mar 
John W. McLellan 
Thomas R. Morse 
W. Newton Nelson 
Foster Nystrom 
Warren Parker 
William Powers 
Roland W. Robbins 
Alls ton Riley 
E. Donlan Rooney 
Charles A. Snelling 
Howard Snelling 
Henry Sturm 
Didrick Tonseth 
Robert Thorson 
John B. Warner 
G. Arnold Wiley 
Edwin L, Williams 
Arthur Witham 



Henry Woods 



Csown Cjovernment 



BEPGRT OF THE BOAILD OF SELECTION 



Communications 

The operators in our local telephone exchange have given such 
good service to our fire and police departments for so many years 
that we had come to accept it as an automatic and perpetual opera- 
tion. On fire calls they notify the fire engineers, truck drivers 
and key call firemen, answer inquiries as to the location and nature 
of fires and do all this at no cost to the Town. On police calls 
they locate the officer on duty even if it is necessary to call 
Concord where the call can be sent out by radio. All this will stop 
on April 30, 1955 when the dial system goes into effect, the local 
office is closed and Arlington becomes the headquarters* 

For many months the fire engineers, police chief, civil defense 
officials and others have been working with the Selectmen on plans 
for a communications system to replace that which we are losing. 
Operations in other towns have been observed, radio systems, tapper 
systems and telephone systems explored and appraised, and costs est- 
imated. The unanimous recommendation is that a central telephone 
switchboard and radio transmitter be established at the Town House 
to-be manned around the clock. 

Specifically, we propose having a switchboard in the Town Offices 
with three trunk lines coming in and 25 direct lines out to the 
following: 

5 Police 
15 Fire 
1 Highway garage 

1 Pumping station 

2 Town offices 
1 Civil Defense 

Additional trunk lines in and direct lines out can be added. A 
radio base station will be located adjacent to the switchboard 
through which the operator can communicate with the two police cars 
which are now equipped with radio and the three fire engines which 
we propose to so equip. In addition, it is planned to move the fire 
whistle to the Town House, a higher and more central location, so it 
too can be operated by the person at the switchboard. 

The personnel problem is of utmost importance. As long as the 
volume of calls is not materially greater than at present, the staff 
in the office can and are willing to man the equipment during regu- 
lar business hours. Their qualifications are evident. During other 
hours, too, it is imperative that we have personnel who are reliable, 



TOUT GOVERN! 1EMT 

calm in emergencies, thoroughly familiar with the Town and well 
trained by both the police and fire engineers so that they can be of 
maximum help to both departments. 

The proposed system involves a minimum of capital expenditure 
&U,887. part of which will probably be reimbursed from Federal Civil 
Defense funds. Hence, we have flexibility to change the system if it 
does not work satisfactorily. Operating expenses are high $6,361;. 
for the balance of 1955 and approximately $9 ,.000. for a twelve months 
period. Most of the operating expense is for personnel and any sys- 
tem would involve this same cost. Ue believe this to be an econom- 
ical and efficient system which will (l) fill the gap resulting from 
introduction of the dial system and (2) provide better service for 
the Town.. 

To the individual telephone operators and to the New England Tel- 
ephone & Telegraph Company we extend our thanks for their co-oper- 
ation and contributions to the welfare of the Town over a period of 
many years. 

Fire Department 

The report of the special committee to re-examine previous recom- 
mendations for a site for a fire station appears elsewhere in this 
volume. In view of the conclusions an article appears in the warrant 
for the 1955 Annual Town Meeting to acquire the suggested site. The 
Selectmen believe that prompt action is desirable. 

The Fire Department continues to function efficiently and success- 
fully. The fire record is so good that many of us do not stop to 
think of the physical effort, planning and sacrifices that go into 
this operation. It must be recognized that the availability of call 
firemen is a constantly more troublesome problem, that the growth of 
the Town accelerates the time when we should have a driver at a sta- 
tion all the time to move out one piece of apparatus immediately and 
that an adequate station is a matter for consideration in the next 
few years, not in the indefinite future. 

Police Department 

Recommendation is made to add a fourth full time man to the police 
force. The use of special police for necessary work which could not 
be handled by the present personnel has been increasing steadily, and 
the need of more hours on traffic control is evident. These facts 
combined indicate that now is the time to make a permanent addition. 
It must be recognized that all police problems are multiplied as the 
city moves nearer to us. 

Lexington and Page Roads 

As the result of a fatal accident and a series of actual and near 
accidents at the intersection of Lexington Road and Route 2 and Page 



10 



SELECTMEN 

Road and Route 2, the Selectmen issued a temporary order, approved 
by appropriate State authority, making both roads one way for a short 
distance near Route 2. Vehicles on Route 2 are not permitted to enter 
either Page Road or Lexington Road. Preliminary conversations with 
the State Department of Public Works assure us of their interest in 
doing something to decrease the hazard to vehicles coming out from 
Cambridge which are trying to turn left onto these roads. It is 
expected confidently that a solution will be found that will elim- 
inate the inconvenience encountered by some residents of the Town as 
a result of the temporary order,. 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Over a period of years Trapelo Road was rebuilt in its entirety 
except for the section from the Center to Lexington Road. A serious 
drainage problem has developed in that section in recent years and 
it is estimated that the cost of building suitable drains would be 
$8,000 to $10,000. The road itself is expensive to maintain and 
will need extensive repairs within a few years in any case. The cost 
of rebuilding the road and drains may be as much as 518,000. With 
the approval of the abutters, the Selectmen have petitioned the 
County and State to accept this section of Trapelo Road for a Chapter 
90 project. The County and State will not participate in the cost of 
solving the drainage problem alone but have tentatively allocated 
$9,000 ($3,000 from the County and $6,000 from the State) to be 
matched by $3*000 from the Town to start a complete rebuilding this 
year if funds are voted by the Town now. It is contemplated that 
this work would be let out by contract. 

Department of Public Works 

Many towns have established Departments of Public Works to centra- 
lize control and management of some or all of the work now done by 
our Highway, Water, Cemetery and Tree and Moth departments. The 
Selectmen believe that the possibilities of economy and better ser- 
vice from such a system should be investigated carefully before any 
recommendation is made to the Town and have inserted an article in 
the Warrant looking to the appointment of a committee to examine this 
matter thoroughly* 

Capital Improvements 

The Selectmen also recommend the appointment of a committee to 
study the capital improvements needed by the Town over, the foresee- ' 
able future. Our experience has been that all such capital invest- 
ments have arisen as emergencies. It is our thought that a committee 
assigned to this one subject would be expected to develop a long 
range program which would permit appropriate timing and financial 
planning .. 



11 



mm GOV^RMMTT 

Administrative Assistant 

The experience of a year and a half has confirmed the opinion of 
the Selectmen that the Town can profitably employ a full time man 
with engineering and municipal background to carry out projects 
approved by the Board, to consult with the Board on problems on which 
his background and training have given him special knowledge and to 
gather information as needed. Our present assistant, Mr. Willard, 
has met with and worked for various other boards and committees in- 
cluding especially the Water Commissioners, Board of Health, Plann- 
ing Board and Bicentennial Committee. A start has been made on 
central purchasing although more can be done in that line. More in- 
formation has been available on various subjects, for instance, comm- 
unications because there was some one available to dig out the mat- 
erial. More prompt action has been taken on many matters, such as 
the dump and garbage collection, because there was some one who 
could be assigned to carry out the plans once they were formulated 
and approved. An interesting side light on this subject is that 
several towns are now adopting this procedure or are seriously con- 
sidering such action. 

Town Dump 

Immediately after the 195U Annual Town Meeting, arrangements were 
made for fencing the dump and for having a man in attendance three 
days a week. Only contractors who make special arrangements have 
access to the dump at other times. Although the salary appears to 
be an added expense, it is offset in part by the decrease in cost of 
clearing up and bulldozing and further by the decrease in the number 
of fire calls.. The slight net increase in cost appears to be well 
justified, and a continuation of the present operation is contem- 
plated as indicated by the budget* 

Garbage Collection 

The system developed in the spring of 195U by which the Town 
collects the fees for garbage collection and pays for collections 
actually made has worked well from all points of view. The clerical 
cost was absorbed by other departments in 195>1| pending determination 
as to whether the system would continue. This year there will be 
allocated to this account the estimated cost of billing and other 
services as was originally contemplated when the schedule of charges 
was set. The number of house holders using this service has been 
rising steadily and is estimated a.t an average of 2^0 for 195>5>« 

Hurricane 

It will be noticed that various departments, especially Highway, 
expended less money than had been budgeted for 195U. This was due 



12 






SELECTMEN 



largely to the hurricanes which necessitated a rearrangement of 
schedules. All expenses of cleaning up after the first hurricane 
became eligible for reimbursement by the State and were charged 
to a separate account rather than to the usual departmental appropri- 
ations • 

Having in mind the fact that the Boston Edison Company has pur- 
chased land for a. substation in Lincoln and the fact that several 
sections of Town were without electricity for several days after 
each hurricane, the Selectmen requested the Company to bring the 
trunk line from Waltham to the substation under ground. The request- 
ed meeting on this subject has not been held as yet. Public support 
for this project will be solicited at the appropriate time. 

Roads 

The steady deterioration of our roads has been accelerated during 
the past year and has reached the point were even more maintenance 
and patching cannot prevent rebuilding much longer. The maintenance 
budget for 195>5 is larger, but there are strong inclinations that the 
Town must soon face a program of extensive draining, shaping and re- 
surfacing. It is expected that the proposed committee on capital ex- 
penditures will give due consideration to this matter. 



Respectfully submitted 

Edmund W. Giles 
Henry DeC. Ward 
John 0. VJilson, Chairman. 



13 



TO.vN GOVERNMENT 



TOWN CLERK »S REPORT 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and activi- 
ties and issues licenses and certificates. His duties include re- 
cording the proceedings at Town Meetings and elections, and notifying 
the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations which 
have been voted. 

The record of Registered Voters of Lincoln is kept at the Clerk's 
office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town should communi- 
cate with the Clerk. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Monday, March 1, 19 5U 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator, Mr. Donald P. Donaldson, at 7:30 o'clock P.M. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and the Moderator called attention to 
Article I. (Election of Officers). 

Article 2. To bring in their votes for any committees, commission- 
ers, trustees, and other officers, required by law to be elected by 
ballot or otherwise. 

Voted: That Clifford II. Bradley and Joseph Tracey be elected 
Measurers of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Voted: That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees and 
Trustees as printed in the Town Report be accepted and the reports of 
the following Committees be accepted as interim reports, and that the 
Committees and their unexpended appropriations be continued: Building 
Code Committee, School Building Committee, 200th Anniversary Committee, 
School Land Committee; and that the following reports be accepted as 
final: Union Health Committee, Town By-laws Committee and Town Report 
Committee. 

Article U. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any Department, 
Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for additional com- 
pensation any of its members and to fix additional compensation of 
such members. 

Voted: That the salaries 



the current year be fixed at the following amounts respectively: 


Selectmen, each $200.00 


Assessors, 


Treasurer 200.00 


other members, each &175« 00 


Collector of Taxes 1,800.00 


Auditor 50.00 


Town Clerk 350.00 


Water Commissioners, 


Assessors, Chairman 200.00 


each 75.00 




Tree Warden 200.00 



TCWN MEETINGS 

Article 5« To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in relation to the 
same. 

At the request of Mr. Wilson the Civil Defense appropriation, Item 
Number 1|2, was held out for discussion. He pointed out the difficul- 
ty of arriving at a figure because of the many unknown factors in- 
volved. Mr. E. R. Todd, Civil Defense Director, then commented on 
what had been done, and referred to the proposed budget as an operating 
budget, which did not allow for capital expenditures such as an auxil- 
iary lighting generator and other equipment. It was his opinion, how- 
ever, that an Auxiliary Police Force could be organized within the 
amount recommended. There was no further discussion and with the in- 
creases and deductions recommended,, the following was 

Voted : That under Article 5 of the Warrant the Town raise and ap- 
propriate for the 19 5h fiscal year the eighty-seven separate appropri- 
ations recommended by the report of the Finance Committee as printed 
in the 1953 Town Report on pages 157 to 165 inclusive, and there be 
raised in addition thereto the following increases: Item 1±2, 097.50 
by transfer of unexpended balance Civil Defense Clerical; Item UhA, 
Garbage Collection Account, $2,500.00, to be taken from Free Cash; 
Item 51, Public Welfare, $2,000.00; Item 71, Town Reports, 015.65; 
Item 72A, Dump Operation and Maintenance, $1,000.00; Item 82, Water 
Works, Meters, Operating Expenses and Miscellaneous, $1,000.00; 
making an aggregate for general purposes of $1^07,558.91 and an aggre- 
gate for Water Works of $27,606.25, and that in connection with the 
foregoing vote the following sums for the several items shall be 
applied from the sources respectively designated, as follows: Item 37, 
Dutch Elm Disease Control, $9h.50 from unexpended balance 1953; Item 
U6, Chapter 90, $3,000.00, from Free Cash and returned thereto when 
reimbursed from State and County; Item 60, New Equipment Schools, 
$711.25 from deCordova School Equipment Fund Income and $53.01 from 
Grammar School Income; Item 62, Books (Library), $500.00 from Free 
Cash to be returned thereto upon receipt of $500.00 from Library Trus- 
tees per agreement; Item 75, School Building (Bonds), $25, 000 „ 00 from 
Free Cash; Items 77, 77a, 80, 81, 82, 83, Water Works, $27,606.25 from 
Water T- T orks Treasury; Item 79, Reserve Fund, $8,000.00 from Free Cash, 
any unexpended balance to be returned thereto. Further voted : that 
the following Balance Sheet Item of Unexpended Accounts on 12/31/53 
be transferred to Surplus: (See Page U6) Town Reports Committee, 
$67. h0; Truck and Sprayer for Tree and Moth Department, $177.30; Re- 
vision of Town By-laws, $150.00; Union Health District, $100.00. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year be- 
ginning January 1, 195U, and to issue a note or notes therefor, pay- 
able within one year and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 17, 
Chapter HU, General Laws. 



15 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Voted : That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen 
be authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 195U> and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with Section 17* Chapter Ui, General Laws. 

Article 7« To see if the Town will vote to conduct services on 
Memorial Day, the thirtieth of Hay, appoint a committee, raise and 
appropriate money, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a committee of 
five to plan and carry out exercises on Memorial Day, the thirtieth 
of May next and that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $150.00 
for the use of such Committee in connection with these exercises. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $97h.30 to pay the following unpaid 1953 bills: 

Water Department $2 76 .00 

School Department 323 •$$ 

Legal 37H.75 

Voted : That the Town appropriate the sum of $97U.30 to pay the 
following unpaid 1953 bills: 

Water Department §2 76 .00 

School Department 323 .55 

Legal 37U.75 

$276.00 to be taken from Water Works Funds and the balance of $698.30 
to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
additional funds for the use of the Bi-centennial Committee, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town appropriate the sum of $3*500.00 for the use 
of the Bi-centennial Committee, said sum to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to purchase the following town vehicles to replace 
existing equipment: Police car, Highway truck, Water Department truck, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $3*199.00, 
$699.00 for the purchase of a police car, Chevrolet to be turned in, 
and $2,500.00 for the purchase of a highway truck, 19U6 White truck 
to be turned in; also the sum of $1,066.00 for the purchase of a 
Water Department truck, 19U8 Chevrolet truck to be turned in, said 
sum to be taken from Water Works Treasury. 

Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purchase of a motor driven street sweeper or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $550.00 for 
the purchase of a motor driven street sweeper. 

16 



TU7TI MEETINGS 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the installation of new alarm equipment for the use 
of the Fire Department or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1,210.00 
for the purchase and installation of new alarm equipment for the fire 
department. 

Article 13* To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a 
public highway that portion of the Old Bedford Road, beginning at the 
Bedford-Lincoln town line, and extending in a southwesterly direction 
for a distance of about 2,100 feet to a point where said Old Bedford 
Road intersects with the substitute way constructed by the Federal 
Government, or take any other action relative thereto » 

Voted : That the Town vote to discontinue as a public highway that 
portion of the Old Bedford Road, beginning at the Bedford-Lincoln town 
line and extending in a southwesterly direction for a distance of about 
2,100 feet, to a point where said Old Bedford Road intersects with the 
substitute way constructed by the Federal Government. 

Article lU. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Modera- 
tor to appoint a committee of five to investigate and study the effect 
on the Town of the development of Lawrence G. Hanscom Field (Bedford 
Airport) and other facilities or operations related thereto; to report 
thereon with recommendations to the Selectmen and with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to take such action with reference thereto as the 
committee may determine to be in the interest of the Town including, 
but not limited to, representing the Town at hearings of legislative 
bodies or governmental agencies; to raise and appropriate the sum of 
five hundred dollars (S500) for the use of said committee, or take 
any other action relative thereto » 

Voted : That the Town of Lincoln authorize the Moderator to appoint 
a committee of five to investigate and study the effects on the Town 
of the development of Lawrence G. Hanscom Field (Bedford Airport) 
and other facilities or operations related thereto; to report thereon 
with recommendations to the Selectmen and with the approval of the 
Selectmen to take such action with reference thereto as the committee 
may determine to be in the best interest of the Town including, but 
not limited to, representing the Town at hearings of legislative "bodies 
or governmental agencies; raise and appropriate the sum of five hun- 
dred dollars ($500 -00) for the use of said committee, including ex- 
penses for travel out of the Commonwealth, said sum to be taken from 
Free Cash. 

Article l£. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-. 
Law by amending Section 11, Paragraph (d) as follows: 

Change the period to a comma and add the following: "and shall also 
hear and decide requests for special permits to issue, subject to con- 
ditions and safeguards imposed by the Board of Appeals, for temporary 
structures and uses which do not conform to the regulations herein 
prescribed, provided that no such permit shall be for longer than a 

17 



Tam GOVERNMENT 

three year period" or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; To amend the Zoning By-Law by amending Section 11, Para- 
graph (d) as follows: Change the period to a comma and add the follow- 
ing: "and shall also hear and decide requests for special permits to 
issue subject to conditions and safeguards imposed by the Board of 
Appeals, for temporary structures and uses which do not conform to 
the regulations herein described, provided that no permit shall be 
for longer than a three year period." 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) for use in mosquito con- 
trol; the appropriation to be expended to re-open mosquito control as 
provided for in Chapter 252 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Moderator appoint a committee of three to bring 
in a report on mosquito control at the next town meeting, regular or 
special. Committee appointed: Charles H. Blake, Mrs. John B. Warner 
and John B. Tew. 

Article 17 • To see if the Town will vote to change the name of 
the street extending from Lexington Road to North Great Road, from 
Mill Street to Old Mill Road. 

Voted : Under this article a motion "That the name of the street 
extending from Lexington Road to North Great Road be changed from 
Mill Street to Old Mill Road" was lost. 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to acquire by purchase, 
gift, eminent domain or any other way, a parcel of land located on 
Bedford Road, south west of the intersection of Route 2 and Bedford 
Road, containing 22,000 square feet more or less, raise and appropriate 
a sum of money therefor or take any action relative thereto* 

Voted : To pass over the Article. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $5*000.00 to be used by a Committee appointed by the Modera- 
tor to study further the building needs of the Lincoln schools, or 
take any other action relative thereto* 

Voted : That the Moderator appoint a committee to study the build- 
ing needs of the elementary school, and make its recommendation to 
the Town, and that the sum of $3,000.00 be appropriated for the use of 
this committee for professional services in developing plans and cost 
estimates if required. Committee appointed: Ernest P. Neumann, 
Elizabeth J. Snelling, Andrew J. Dougherty, Elliott V. Grabill and 
Stanley Heck. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sura of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000) or any other sum, for 
the use of the Regional District School Committee in the event that a 
Regional School District is established with the Town of Sudbury by 
vote of the Town of Sudbury and by vote of this Town on the related 

18 



ELECTIONS 

question in Article 1 of this Warrant; such sum to be made available 
to said Regional District School Committee, if and when created, only 
after a budget of such Committee has been approved by the Finance Com- 
mittee and Selectmen of this Town and the Town of Sudbury, in accord- 
ance with provisions of a proposed agreement filed with the Selectmen, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; (unanimously) That the Town appropriate the sum of fifteen 
thousand dollars ($1^,000.00) for the use of .the Regional District 
School Committee of the Regional School District in the event that 
such Regional School District is established by vote of the Town of 
Sudbury on March 1st, 195U, and by vote of this Town on the related 
question in Article 1 of the Warrant for this Town Meeting, such sum 
to be taken from Free Cash. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to repeal the present 
Town By-Laws except the Zoning By-Law and the Building Code By-Law 
and adopt new "General By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln." 

Voted ; (unanimously) That the Town repeal the present Town By- 
Laws except the Zoning By-Laws and the Building Code By-Laws and 
adopt new "General By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln" as printed under 
Article 21 of the warrant for this meeting. At this point Mr. Henry 
Warner spoke of the good and efficient work of Mr. F. Winchester 
Denio for the Committee. Loud and prolonged applause. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 6, 195U 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant the Moderator declared 
the polls open at 12 o'clock noon, previously the ballot box had been 
inspected and the following Ballot Clerks duly sworn; Helena A. Dee, 
Helen M. Dougherty, Ann E. Paddock, Manley B. Boyce, D. Everett Sher- 
man, Jr., and William 0. Causer, the Polls were declared closed at 
7 o'clock P. M. with the following results. Total number of votes 
cast 722. 

Moderator (Three years) 

Donald P. Donaldson 68U 

Blanks 38 

Town Clerk (One year) 

William H. Davis 69U 

Blanks 28- 

Selectman (Three years) 

Henry DeC. Ward 6 71 

Blanks $1 



19 



TWN GOVERNMENT 

Assessor (Three years) 

Arthur W. Rice, Jr. ••• 661 

Blanks 6l 

Treasurer (One year) 

Frederick B. Taylor 680 

Blanks h2 

Auditor (One year) 

Louis C . Farley, Jr • • 661; 

Blanks 58 

School Committee (Three years) 

Lucy E. Bygrave 289 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson • • 1+26 

Blanks 7 

Water Commissioner (Three years) 

Robert W. Scott 286 

Edward S. Taylor 1*21 

Scattering • 1 

Blanks • * • • Hi 

Board of Health (Three years) 

Ellen DeN. Cannon . 669 

Blanks .... .... ... 53 

Tree Warden (One year) 

Daniel A, Maclnnis, Jr. ••....»••••• 668 

Blanks 5U 

Commissioner of Trust Funds (Three years) 

William T. King .... 662 

Blanks . 60 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures (Three years) 

Leonard C. Larrabee ••......••.•.....•»..• ..661 

Blanks 61 

Cemetery Commissioner (Three years) 

Robert D. Donaldson . 667 

Blanks 55 

Planning Board (Five years) 

Alan McClennen •• ..»•....••.... 662 

Blanks 60 

Director of deCordova and Dana Museum (Four years) 

Elizabeth J. Snelling .673 

31anks k9 

20 



TCWN MEETINGS 

Question No. 1 
Regional School District 

Yes 651 

No 36 

Blanks 35 

Question No. 2 
(An Act restricting the use of lands abutting the highway known 
as Route 2 in the towns of Lincoln and Concord) 

Yes U73 

No 136 

Blanks * 63 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
July 26, 195U 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served the Meeting was called to order 
by the Town Clerk at 7:30 P.M. The return of the Warrant was read, 
on motion, seconded Mr. Sumner Smith was elected temporary Moderator 
and duly sworn. 

Article 1. To see if the Town disapproves of the amount of debt 
($100,000) authorized by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School 
Committee for the purpose of acquiring land, constructing, originally 
equipping and furnishing a school building. 

Under this Article a motion "That this meeting go on record as 
expressing disapproval of the amount of debt, namely $100,000, 
authorized by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee 
for the purpose of acquiring land, constructing, originally equipping 
and furnishing a school building" was lost, the vote against the 
motion being unanimous. The meeting adjourned at 8 o 1 clock P.M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 

STATE PRIMARY 
September lit, 19 5U 

Warrant 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in the Town House Tuesday, the fourteenth day of 
September, 195U> at one o'clock P.M. for the following purposes: To 
bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the nomination of 
Candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: Governor, 
Lieutenant Governor, Secretary, Treasurer and Receiver General, Audi- 
tor, Attorney General, Senator in Congress, all for this Commonwealth; 
Representative in Congress, 5th Congressional District, Senator, 5th 

21 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Senatorial District, Representative in General Court, 10th Middlesex 
District, Councillor, 3rd Councillor District, District Attorney, 
Registrar of Probate and Insolvency, Middlesex County, County Com- 
missioner, Middlesex County, County Treasurer, Middlesex County. The 
polls will be open from one P.M. to eight P.M. Hereof fail not and 
make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and 
place of said meeting. Given under our hands this 23rd day of 
August A.D. 19?U. 

Edmund ¥• Giles ) Selectmen 
Henry DeC. Ward ) of 
J. 0. Wilson ) Lincoln 

Friday, September 3> 19 ?U 
A True Copy Attest: Leo J. Algeo, Constable 



In accordance with the above Warrant the Polls were declared open 
at one P.M. by Mr. Henry DeC. Ward, Warden. The following Ballot 
Clerks were duly sworn: Helena A. Dee, Helen M. Dougherty, Manley B. 
Boyce, Elizabeth J. Snelling, William 0. Causer and D. Everett Sherman, 
Jr© At h o ! clock P.M. Mr. Edmund W. Giles assumed the duties of 
Warden, Mr. John 0. Wilson assumed Warden's duties at 6:30 P.M. and 
declared the Polls closed at 8 P.M. Total vote, 916 Republican 879, 
Democratic 37 • 

Republican 
Governor 

Christian A. Herter 8l£ 

Blanks 6k 

Lieutenant Governor 

Sumner G. Whittier 802 

Blanks 77 

Secretary 

Michael G. McCarty 786 

Blanks 93 

Treasurer 

Augustus G. Means 78f> 

Blanks „ 9k 

Auditor 

William P. Constantino 786 

Blanks 93 

Attorney General 

George Fingold 801 

Blanks 78 

22 



ELECTIONS 



Senator in Congress 

Leverett Saltonstall • • .... 813 

Blanks • •••••••••»•••»»•••••• ♦ •••• • •• 66 

Congressman, 5th Middlesex 

Edith Nourse Rogers ••••• 797 

Blanks 82 

Councillor, 3rd District 

David B. Williams 79k 

Blanks 85 

Senator, 5th Middlesex 

Richard I. Furbush 807 

Blanks 72 

Representative in General Court, 10th Middlesex 

Jefts B. Beede 60 

B. Allen Benjamin Ul 

James L. Cunningham 182 

James DeNormandie • • • ...» 590 

Blanks • 6 

District Attorney, Northern District 

George E. Thompson • 713 

Blanks 166 

Register of Probate and Insolvency, Middlesex County 

Sumner R. Andrews • • •• 121 

Gordon L . Axtman • 7 

James J. Bagley • 29 

Robert W. Cook . 3U 

Lawrence H.' Davis 56 

Warren J. Fitzgerald •••••.••••.»• 380 

Gordon F. Hughes •• 16 

John F. Lombard » 2I4. 

Clarence E. Lord • »•••••••••»•«. 3 

Frederick J. Wheeler, Jr o 17 

Blanks ♦ 192 

County Commissioner, Middlesex County 

Alan G. Adams U55 

Stanley E. Andrews . . 115 

Ernest Brenner 67 

Albert L. Daigle • .. ... - 9 

Guy Dinnuccio * 7 

Oelbert A. Merenda • ..^». •••.. •»».»• 5 

Ellis Sutcliffe 18 

Horace H.Walker ••»•••••.. ».. 10 



23 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

D. Paul Wormwood » 6 

Blanks .... 187 

County Treasurer, Middlesex County 

Charles P. Howard 713 

Blanks * 166 

Democratic 
Governor 

Robert F. Murphy 26 

Francis E. Kelley 9 

Scattering 1 

Blanks ,. - 1 

Lieutenant Governor 

James A* Burke •••••••••••••••••••• ••• 32 

Blanks * ♦. 5 

Secretary 

Edward J* Cronin • 33 

Blanks • k 

Treasurer 

Clement A. Riley * 18 

William F. Carr 7 

John F. Kennedy • • 11 

Blanks • • 1 

Auditor 

Thomas J* Buckley •....••». ••••• 33 

Blanks • •••••••• • h 

Attorney General 

John F. Collins 32 

Blanks 5 

Senator in Congress 

Foster Furcolo ......... • 29 

John J. Fitzgerald k 

Joseph L, Murphy 3 

Blanks 1 

Congressman, 5th Congressional 

J* L. Cunningham • •••• 1 

Blanks • 36 

Councillor, 3rd District 

Joseph P. Ducca • • 6 

Orlando P. Harris 2 

Endicott Peabody • 16 

2U 



ELECTIONS 

Thomas C. Quinn 10 

Blanks 3 

Senator, 5th Middlesex 

James J. Vahey • 33 

Blanks h 

Representative in (leneral Court, 10th Middlesex 

P. Joseph Murphy 29 

J, L. Cunningham h 

Blanks h 

District Attorney, Northern District 

Joseph V. Carroll • 2 

Charles H. lie Cue 6 

Paul V. Shaughnessy 20 

Ervin L. Stackpole 5 

Blanks • • k 

Register of Probate and Insolvency, Middlesex County 

John J. Butler 7 

Philip P* Dever • 6 

John J. Foley . .. 12 

Clifford Halligan 1 

John V. Harvey 5 

Blanks 6 

County Commissioner, Middlesex County 

Thomas B • Brennan 10 

John J. Burke • 2 

Joseph Perry Costa 1 

Walter J. Frizzell 

William E. Higham •••• ... 1 

James P. McCarthy ••••.•••••••• • U 

Jeannette C. Chi sholm Sullivan 1$ 

Blanks ij 

County Treasurer, Middlesex County 

C. Michael Bradley •• 2 

Francis T. Crawford 

Timothy J. Cronin ... 7 

Joseph M. Curley 3 

Edward L. Harley 2 

Daniel J. Harley 3 

Joseph T. Kelleher jj 

Francis R. King . 3 

John J. McGlynn 

Wilbur F. Nixon ... ... . . 2 

Dennis O'Keefe 1 



25 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Michael A. O'Leary 3 

Blanks 7 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
October 10, 195U 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to order 
by the Moderator at 7:30 o'clock P.M., the return of the Warrant was 
read, and the following business transacted: 

Article 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purpose of constructing and originally equip- 
ping and furnishing an addition to the elementary school to include 
four class rooms and determine how the appropriation will be raised, 
by transfer from available funds, borrowing, or otherwise, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Voted : (unanimously) That the sum of $llj.2, 550.00 be raised and 
appropriated for the purpose of constructing and originally equipping 
and furnishing an addition to the elementary school to include four 
class rooms and, to meet said appropriation, that the sum of $12,550. 
be appropriated from available funds in the treasury, and that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and he hereby is author- 
ized to borrow the sum of $130,000.00, and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor; said loan hereby authorized is under the authority 
of and in accordance with the provisions of Chapter kh of General Laws; 
and that the committee appointed by the Moderator in accordance with a 
vote of the Town under Article 19 at the Annual Meeting on March 1, 
195U, is hereby continued and is hereby authorized and empowered to 
enter into contracts, and to do all things necessary to construct and 
equip and furnish said addition; and if a vacancy should occur in said 
committee the Moderator is hereby authorized to fill such vacancy; and 
in the event that a court of competent Jurisdiction shall on or before 
March 1, 1955* decree that the sums left to the Town of Lincoln under 
Article 6 of the Will of Charles S. Smith be applied toward the cost 
of the said addition to the new elementary school, that all sums made 
available by such court decree be and they hereby are appropriated as 
a part of the sum of $114.2,550.00 above appropriated, and, in that 
event, the sum of $130,000.00, which the Treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow, shall be reduced to the sum 
of $30,000.00, and that the sura of $12,550.00 appropriated hereunder 
from available funds in the treasury be reduced by any sums so decreed 
by the court in excess of the sum of $100,000.00. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct 
the Selectmen, in behalf of the Town, to petition a court of competent 
jurisdiction to decree that the sums left to the Town of Lincoln under 
Article 6 of the Will of Charles S. Smith be applied toward the cost 
of the proposed addition to the elementary school, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted: (unanimously) To authorize and direct the Selectmen, in 

26 



TOWN MEETINGS 

behalf of the Town, to petition a court of competent jurisdiction to 
decree that the sums left to the Town of Lincoln under Article 6 of 
the Will of Charles S. Smith be applied towards the cost of the pro- 
posed addition to the elementary school, such school to be called the 
Charles Sumner Smith School. (At this time, Mr. F. Winchester Denio 
made the following remarks: "For the benefit of those who never knew 
Mr. Smith, I am awfully glad to tell you of some of his activities. 
He was our Representative in General Court for several terms, Chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen, Chairman of the Board of Cemetery Commission- 
ers, and a Commissioner of Trust Funds. He always had the interest 
of the Town at heart, and I can truthfully say no one did more than he 
for the Town he loved." Loud and prolonged applause)© 

Article 3« To see if the Town will vote to acquire by purchase, 
gift, eminent domain, or any other way, a parcel of land located on 
Bedford Road, southwest of the intersection of Bedford Road and Route 
2, appropriate a sum of money therefor or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Voted : That the Moderator appoint a Committee of five citizens, to 
include (l) the Chairman of the Fire Engineers, (2) the Chairman of the 
Planning Board, and three others, none of whom is a present member of 
any Town Board, such Committee to further study the needs of the Town 
in relation to Fire Department housing and advisable sites ; and to make 
at least a progress report to the Town at the next regular Town Meeting , 
Committee appointed: Andrew J» Dougherty, Richard J. Eaton, S. Leonard 
Arnold, Henry M. Morgan and Russell L. Haden, Jr. 

Article h. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate additional 
funds for the use of the Water Department or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town take 51,800,00 from Salary and Wage Account 
and transfer it to the account of Meters and Operating Expense, also 
that the Town appropriate 51, 500.00 for a heater for the pumping sta- 
tion, the money to be taken from the Water Works Treasury. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate additional 
funds for the use of the New School Construction Committee, or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the sum of $3*7k3.56 be appropriated from Free Cash to 
the use of the Lincoln School Building Committee. 

Article 6. To see if the Town will accept as a public way the 
private road known as Granville Road approved by the Lincoln Planning 
Board December 27, 1951. 

Voted : For the benefit of the abuttors to obtain the advantage of 
Town maintenance, subject to the receipt of a deed under easement in 
form satisfactory to the Selectmen, that the Town accept as a public 
way the private road now known as Granville Road, formerly Llanover 
Road, as shown on a plan duly recorded with Middlesex South District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 8195, Page U±8, and approved by the Planning 

27 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Board of the Town of Lincoln on December 23, 1953 • 

Article 7«. To determine whether the Town shall instruct the Town 
Clerk to send to the two U. S. Senators from Massachusetts, and to 
its representative in Congress for the 5th Congressional District a 
petition, request or statement in regard to the use of the so-called 
Bedford Airport, known officially as the Lawrence G. Hanscom Field, 
by the U. S. Air Force for military purposes; or take any other action 
relative to the danger, property damage and annoyance to the citizens 
of the Town caused by the use of said Airport for military purposes, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Under this Article the following resolution was passed unanimously: 
"That it is the opinion of this meeting that the interests of the Town 
require drastic action with reference to the Lawrence G. Hanscom Field 
(Bedford Airport) and that the following communication be presented 
forthwith to the United States Senators from Massachusetts and to our 
Representative in the Fifth Congressional District: "The citizens of 
the Town of Lincoln hereby declare to you their opposition to the in- 
creasing use of Lawrence G. Hanscom Field (Bedford Airport) by military 
aircraft and urgently request you to use every means in your power to 
have the amount of flying reduced and the expansion of the facilities 
of the airport curtailed. Reserve training out of this airport is 
absolutely unnecessary. Training could be as well accomplished at 
nearby airports farther removed from a great center of population. 
These flights are now ruining the peace of our Saturdays, holidays 
and Sundays, and even interrupt divine service. We ask you to have 
these flights entirely stopped and all training activities removed to 
other bases. The defence of Boston according to informed opinion 
can be accomplished effectively without stationing air defence wings 
at Bedford. He request that the number of jet fighters stationed at 
Bedford be kept at the absolute minimum necessary for the research 
mission only. 

"We recognize that the experimental research now being conducted 
at Bedford cannot easily be relocated, because of the proximity of 
the base to centers of scientific knowledge; however, a large portion 
of this is planned to terminate within a definite period. Therefore, 
we cannot accept the present vast program of permanent construction 
now underway at Bedford as necessary. 

"The citizens of Lincoln are aroused by the menace to their safety, 
peace and happiness; real estate values are being endangered. The 
roar of jet planes turns away prospective purchasers. Banks are be- 
coming reluctant to accept mortgages on property. Some residents 
are considering selling their homes and moving to less troubled neigh- 
borhoods. There is increasing fear that planes will crash in this 
area. 

"We are prepared to make, and do make, necessary sacrifices for the 
national safety; the burden of continuous flying during the five day 
week we recognize as necessary, but the addition of weekends and holi- 
day flying at this center for purposes other than research we feel is 
an unreasonable imposition. We do not believe that the transforma- 



TOWN MEETINGS 

tion of Bedford, originally projected as a research field into a 
training and defence base is either necessary or in the best interests 
of the state and nation. It is certainly detrimental to the surround- 
ing Towns and promises to be ruinous. We ask your utmost co-opera- 
tion to alleviate this situation and call on you to justify the con- 
fidence shown in you in electing you as our representatives in Con- 
gress by putting a stop to this encroachment on our rights as citizens 
by the military establishment." 

(In accordance with the above resolution letters were air-mailed 
to the Honorable Edith Nourse Rogers, Honorable Leverett Saltonstall 
and Honorable John F. Kennedy on October 19, 19 5>U, to all of which 
replies were received promising to look into the matter and take steps 
to alleviate the nuisance.) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will instruct the Board of Water 
Commissioners to extend the water pipes on Concord Road approximately 
225 feet to the Lincoln Stand, appropriate money for the same, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Voted ; To pass over the Article. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000.00 to be used by the Planning Board to employ assist- 
ance in obtaining information bearing on possible changes of the 
Zoning By-Laws and the preparation of a report; or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Town appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to be used 
by the Planning Board to employ assistance in obtaining information 
bearing on possible changes of the Zoning By-Law in respect to sizes 
in residential districts and for the preparation of a report, and that 
said sum be taken from free cash. 

The meeting adjourned at 10;30 o 1 clock P.M. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 

State Election 
November 2, 19SU 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7 o» clock A. M. by Mr. John 0. Wilson, Warden. Previously the ballot 
box was inspected and the following ballot clerks duly sworn: Helena 
A. Dee, Helen M. Dougherty, Manley B. Boyce, Elizabeth J. Snelling, 
William 0. Causer and D. Everett Sherman, Jr.j at 1 P.M. Mr. Edmund W. 
Giles assumed the Warden's duties and at h P.M. Mr. Henry DeC. Ward 
took over the duties of Warden. At 7 P.M. it was voted: To keep the 
polls open until 8 o'clock P.M., at which tiine the Polls were declared 
closed. Total vote 1371. 

Governor 
Christian A. Herter Republican 1138 

29 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Robert F. Murphy . . Democratic . . . . 226 

Laurence Gilf edder Socialist Labor • 1 

Guy S . Williams • Prohibition 

Blanks 6 

Lieutenant Governor 

Sumner G. Whittier • Republican 1126 

James A. Burke Democratic 220 

Donald E. Babcock Prohibition 2 

Francis A. Vetane Socialist Labor k 

Blanks 19 

Secretary 

Edward J. Gronin Democratic 286 

Michael J, McCarthy Republican 103U 

Fred M. Ingersoll Socialist Labor 2 

William D . Ros s Prohibition 7 

Blanks Il2 

Treasurer 

John F. Kennedy Democratic 262 

Augustus G. Means Republican .1080 

Henning A, Blemen .-., Socialist Labor 1 

Isaac Geddard , , . . Prohibition 

Blanks . . . » 28 

Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley .. Democratic •««•»•** 329 

William P. Constantino ... Republican ....*...«...... 99$ 

John B. Lauder Prohibition 3 

Anthony Martin • • . • • Socialist Labor 3 

Blanks . Ill 

Attorney General 

George Fingold Republican 1100 

John F # Collins Democratic 2u6 

Howard B Rand Prohibition 1 

Malcolm T. Rowe Socialist Labor 2 

Blanks 22 

Senator in Congress 

Leverett Saltonstall Republican 1096 

Foster Fur colo Democratic 2^0 

Thelma Ingersoll Socialist Labor 3 

Harold J. Ireland Prohibition 2 

Blanks 20 



30 



ELECTIONS 

Congressman, 5th District 

Edith Nourse Rogers Republican 1161| 

Scattering ♦•• 2 

Blanks 205 

Councillor, 3rd District 

Endicott Peabody Democratic 29? 

David B . Williams Republican ■ IOI4.O 

Phma J. Nally Prohibition 1 

Blanks . . . 35 

Senator, 5th Middlesex District 

Richard I, Furbush Republican 1131 

James J • Vahey Democratic • 202 

Blanks 38 

Representative in General Court, 10th Middlesex District 

James DeNormandie Republican 1121 

P. Joseph Murphy Democratic 215 

Scattering . . • 1 

Blanks 3U 

District Attorney, Northern District 

George E. Thompson Republican 10°6 

Joseph V. Carroll Democratic 237 

Blanks 38 

Register of Probate and Insolvency, Middlesex County 

Warren J. Fitzgerald Republican 1090 

John J, Foley Democratic 237 

Blanks 38 

County Commissioner, Middlesex County 

Thomas B • Brennan Democratic 2 81 

Alan G. Adams Republican ••••• IOI4.8 

Blanks U2 

County Treasurer, Middlesex County 

Charles P. Howard Republican 108U 

Timothy J . Cronin Democratic 239 

Blanks U8 

Question No. 1 

A. All Alcoholic Beverages Yes 222 

No 10U| 

Blanks ... 135 

B . Wines and Beers Yes 2li2 

No 953 

Blanks ... 1?6 

31 



TOWN GOVERNMENT 



C. Packages Yes 332 

No 893 

Blanks . • • • li|6 

Question No, 2 

A. Horse Races Yes 316 

No 908 

Blanks .... 1U7 

B. Dog Races c Yes 258 

No 925 

Blanks .... 188 

Question No. 3 
Retirement Pension Yes 61|6 

No 555 

Blanks .... 170 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 2, 195U 

In accordance -with a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator at 7:30 o ! clock P.M. The return of the War- 
rant was read, and the Moderator called attention to the invitation 
to the citizens of Lincoln to visit Bedford Airport. The following 
business was transacted: 

Article 1. To see whether the Town disapproves of the amount of 
debt, one million four hundred thousand dollars ($1,1*00,000.00) 
authorized by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee 
for the purpose of acquiring land, constructing, originally equipping 
and furnishing a school building. 

Voted: A motion "That this meeting go on record as expressing 
disapproval of the amount of debt, namely $1,U00,000.00 authorized by 
the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee for the pur- 
pose of acquiring land, constructing, originally equipping and fur- 
nishing a school building" was lost, the vote being unanimous. 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate additional 
funds for the use of the Department of Public Welfare or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Voted : That the Town appropriate the sum of §2,000.00 for the use 
of the Department of Public Welfare, said sum to be taken from free 
cash. 






Article 3o To see if the Town will accept, as a public way, the 
private road known as Tabor Hill Road, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Voted: To pass over the Article. 



32 



TOWN MEETINGS 



Article U. To hear and act upon the report of the Mosquito Con- 
trol Committee, raise and appropriate money or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Voted ; That the Tovm of Lincoln, through the Selectmen and/or the 
Board of Health petition the State Reclamation Board at a time to be 
determined by the Town, to join the East Middlesex Mosquito Control 



District. 

Meeting adjourned at 9:l5 P.M« 



William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



LICENSES 

Total number of Dog Licenses issued during the year 195U, U33: 
namely, 2$3 Male, 61 Female, 111 Spayed Female and 8 Kennel, for 
which the sum of $1,032 JxO has been paid to the Treasurer. 

Sporting, etc., issued during the year 1°5U: Fishing, 95$ Hunting, 
$8$ Sporting, U8; Minor Fishing, 11 j Female Fishing, 21$ Minor Trap- 
ping, 1; Non-Re sident Fishing, lj Non-Re sident Hunting, 1; Non-Re si- 
dent Military, 1; Duplicate, 1, for which the sum of S773o75> has been 
paid to the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

William H. Davis, Town Clerk 



33 



& 



inance 



REPORT OF THE STATE AM) TOWN AUDITORS 



The work of the State Auditor in 195U consisted, as usual, 
of a thorough check of the Town's financial records for the pre- 
ceding year, 1953 9 and the preparation of a statement of the 
Town's financial condition at the beginning of the year 195U* 

The statutes provide that -the "substance" of the State 
Auditor's report be published. In the Town Auditor's opinion, 
this substance is contained in the balance sheet of the Town pre- 
pared by the State Auditor, showing the condition of the Town as 
of December 31* 1953 • A summarization of this Balance Sheet is 
published below. 

The full Auditor's report is on file with the Town Clerk, 
and is available for the examination of any interested citizens 
of the Town. 

Louis C. Farley, Jr., Town Auditor 



3U 



FINANCE 



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FINANCE 

TREASURER'S REPORT, CALENDAR YEAR 195U 
January 1, Balance * $l63,6li5«55 

RECEIPTS 

Bi-Centennial Committee 1,579.00 

Board of Appeals ...».„ *. . . . 125.00 

Board of Health 

Licenses 31*00 

Nurse . . ....... - ► 138.00 

Garbage Collections 3,696 .38 

Anti-Rabies Dog Clinic * * * . . 85.50 

Refund from Board of Health Union Committee 7 .62' 

Borrowed in Anticipation of Taxes . . 100,000.00 

Cemetery, digging graves 1+55*00 

City of Cambridge, Taxes 779.08 

Collector of Taxes 322,898.1*2 

Interest and costs ............. 1+0U.1+7 

Concord Court Fines 225.00 

deCordova School Equipment Fund Income ►... 692-.31 

Highways 

Local 589*80 

Machinery * 1,353 .00 

Inspectors,. Building, Plumbing and Wiring • 681.00 

Insurance dividend, refund, etc. • •• 59.03 

Interest on Deposits 2,626.69 

Library Fines 355.50 

Transfer from Library Trust Funds 500.00 

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of 

Income Tax .... .. $ 16,709.95 

Corporation Tax 16,800.00 

Highways, Snow Removal 165.00 

Licenses • 8 .00 

Old Age Assistance 17,301.63 - 

Aid to Dependent Children 13.37 

a/c Loss of Taxes ... 586.02 

Meals Tax 1,012.17 

School Aid, Ch. 70 12,800.00 

School Transportation 17,058.00 

School Construction 5,Ol]lj..69 

Vocational Education 19.80 

Division of Child Guardianship 1,81|2*15 89*360.78 

Miscellaneous Licenses, etc. •»•• • 61.76 

Middlesex County: 

Dog Tax * 829*17 

Old Age Assistance Refunds •• 630.92 

Planning Board ► 128.00 

Real Estate Tax Refund 2,139*35 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 20.00 

Schools 

Grammar School Fund $ 37.28 

School Damage Refund • 323.55 

Health Unit 5.11 

Telephone Tolls 7*12 

Rentals 100.00 

Tuition Refund 88.66 

Damage •••••* <*• 10U.01 

Miscellaneous 15.00 680.73 

36 



TREASURER 

Stickel Claim,, case dismissed by Court ► $ 1, 750,00 

Town Clerk, Dog Licenses 1>032 .1+0 

Town Hall Rental ..- *• hU.OO 

U.S., O.A. A + 13,37l±.70 

U. S-, O.A.A. Adm 760»31 

$>711,739.U7 



PAYMENTS 

Selectmen 1 s Orders (see detail) $556,752 ,03 * 

Mass. Commonwealth of: 

State Parks and Reservations 689 «33 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 1,525*23 

Middlesex County: 

195U Tax 11,685.75 

Dog Licenses l,02l±.00 

Tuberculosis Hospital r 2,855*51 

Total Payments - 571i>531«85 

Balance in Banks, December 31* 195H 137,102.62 

Petty Cash Funds 105»00 

1735773937 



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FINANCE 

GENERAL FUND, DECEMBER 31, 195U 

Assets 

Harvard Trust Co., Concord branch $ 15,108.60 

Day Trust Co., Boston 25,778.75 

First National Bank of Boston 3,708.82 

Arlington Five Cents Savings Bank . U,919.93 

Belmont Savings Bank . ... • U,U71.25 

Beverly Savings Bank lj.,690.U3 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank - U,37h.05 

Brockton Savings Bank . » It,81i3.91 

Brookline Savings Bank 2,UU3 .20 

Cambridge Savings Bank 5,153 •OJ4 I 

Charlestown Savings Bank 5,U29 .10 ! 

East Bridgewater Savings Bank • I4, 867 .17 | 

Franklin Savings Bank k> 96%, 65 \ 

Home Savings Bank U,935.0l* 

Institution for Savings in Roxbury I4, 868 .09 

Lowell Institution for Savings 2,362 .79 

Lynn Five Cents Savings Bank U,89lu21 

Maiden Savings Bank 2, 1+26.75 

Natick Five Cents Savings Bank 1,256 .55 

Newton Savings Bank li,953 »U6 

North Avenue Savings Bank 2,503 .11 

Warren Institution for Savings 7,113 .38 

Whitman Savings Bank 5,035.3k 

Concord Co-operative Bank 6,000.00 

$137,102.62 

Petty cash 105.00 

Charles S. Smith Fund, payable on demand 100,000 .00 

Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes, interest to be added 18,353 .^l 

Middlesex County, Chapter 90 Maintenance . 1, 500.00 

Comm. of Mass., Chapter 90 Maintenance ... 1^500.00 

Comm. of Mass. Old Age Assistance 2,99U.2ii 

Underestimate, 195U County Hosp 2.32 

Authorized overdraft, Hurricane 13,135.36 

Due from Water Dept 378.72 37,861.;. 05 

Total Assets $2.75,071.67 






Liabilities and Surplus 

Dog licenses, due County 35.00 

Road Machinery Fund , 3,295.06 

Federal grants for Public Welfare: 

Old Age Assistance Administration 21.25 

Aid to Dependent Children ii65 »3S 

Aid to Dependent Children Administration 19 Ml 

Aid to Disabled 1+00.78 

Aid to Disabled Administration 10.85 

Old Age Assistance Recovery Ili7.7ii 

Overestimate of State Parks Assessment 2.71 

Overestimate of County Tax U+0.99 

U6 



TREASURER 

Cemetery Investment Fund Income $ 136 .99 

Grammar School Fund income 37 .28 

deCordova School Equipment Fund income « 692 .31 

Unexpended appropriation balances: 

Assessors 1 maps $ 300.00 

Bedford Airport Committee £00.00 

Building Code Committee 195*25 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 1,1;62.05 

Cemetery improvements 155 .57 

Civil Defense I2I4..63 

New Highway truck 2,500.00 

New School Addition No. 1 U11.2U 

New School Addition No. 2 (see note) 106,887.U2. 

New School Land Committee • 750.00 

Planning Board Zoning Survey 772.50 

Preservation of Town Records 150.00 

Regional School Committee 25»80 

Two Hundredth Anniversary Committee. 81.29 lib, 315. 75 

Overlay reserves, 1953 2,361.72 

195U 6, 85o.3li 9,212.06 

Overlay Surplus 17,655.07 

General Funds Surplus: 

Receivables, reserved until collected. 15,135 .59 

Available Surplus ("Free Cash") »113,0li7.U2 128,183.01 

Total Reserves and Surplus $275,071.67 



Note: This amount includes $100,000 from the Charles S. Smith 
Fund. An additional $30,000 has been appropriated, to 
be raised by borrowing which has been authorized but 
not yet issued. 

OUTSTANDING DEBT 

$1^0,000 School Building Loan, 1 3A%> due $10,000 each December 1, 
1955-1968, issued under Chapter 208,, Acts of 19l±8. 

60,JD00 School Building loan, 1 3/h%, due $5,000 each December 1, 
1955-1958, and $U,000 each December 1, 1959-1968, issued 
under Chapter hk, General Laws, as amended. 

16,000 Highway Equipment Building Loan, 1 3/h%, due $U,000 each 
December 1, 1955-1958, issued under Chapter UU, General 
Laws, as amended. 

211,000 School Building Loan, 1 3A£, due $13,000 each December 1, 
1955-1961, and $12,000 each December 1, 1962-1971, issued 
under Chapter 356, Acts of 1951. 

70,000 School Building Loan, 1 ?>/h%, due $5,000 each December 1, 
1955-1956, and $14,000 each December 1, 1957-1971, issued 
under Chapter hh, General Laws, as amended. 



U7 



'INANCE 



U,000 Water Equipment Loan, 2 3/1$, due $2,000 each August 1, 1955 
1956, issued under Chapter kh 9 General Laws, as amended. 

2,500 Water Main Loan, 2 3/1;$, due $1,000 each November- 1,, 1955 - 
1956, and $500 November 1, 1957, issued under Chapter hh. 
General Laws as amended. 



$503,500 

— =— » SCHOOL MILK FUND 

Balance, January 1, 1951; $ 70.57 

Receipts 1,962. 7U $2,033*31 

Payments 1,539 *hZ 

December 31, 195U, Balance on Deposit U93.89 






WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT 

January 1, Balance $2,228.68 

Receipts 

Operating: 

Rates, 1953 $ 676*25 

Meter, 1953 57.50 

Rates, 195U 2l+,211.50 

Meter,, 195U h39.9h 

Rent of Hydrants 3,195*00 

Water Connections 3,U6l.53 

Meter Pits, etc 893.02 

Miscellaneous 315.12 33, 21+9.86 

$35,U78.5U 

Expenses 

Salaries & Wages 9,903.72 

Supplies & Maintenance 8,026.97 

Meters and Operating Expense 5,890 Jx3> 

Bonds and interest 3,261.25 

Truck 1,3^2.00 

Heating System 1,000.00 29,i;2l;.37 

December 31, 195U, Balance on Deposit $ 6,05U»17 

$35,U78.5U 



18 



TREASURER 
SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 



Old Bedford Road 



Balance from 1953 $ 757 J-3 

Expenditures 1+96.98 

December 31, 195U, Balance on Deposit & 260.15 



CEMETERY INVESTMENT FUND 

Cash Account 

Receipts in 19 5U 

Proceeds of sale of Cemetery lots % 75U.OO 

Interest on savings account 2j?Iul9 

$1,008.19 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate *25>lul9 

Safe deposit box rent IwOO 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings • 607«00 865 » 19 

Cash Balance at December 3>1 9 195U % lii3 .00 

Cash on deposit & 1^3 .00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 9j269»69 

$9 ,102 .69 



Frederick A. Taylor, Town Treasurer 



h9 



FINANCE 



PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



December 



Deposited in Middlesex 


accumulated 


paid in 


1951* 


31, 1951* 


Inst, for Savings 


Principal 


before 1°5U 


1951* 


Income 


Balance 


Samuel Hartwell 


$ 300.00 


$ 30.56 


$ - 


$ 9.98 


$ 31*0.51* 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


81.86 


59-70 


9.72 


331.88 


Annie A. Ray 


300.00 


93.08 


- 


11.87 


l*ol*.95 


Maria L. Thompson 


500.00 


175.15 


60.70 


18.56 


633.01 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


78.33 


59.20 


15.68 


53h.8l 


George F. Harrington 


100.00 


7.75 


- 


3.25 


111.00 


Francis Flint 


250.00 


97.20 


- 


10.1*9 


3*7.69 


William W. Benjamin 


500.00 


210.18 


1*6.10 


20.07 


68U.15 


Abijah Jones 


300.00 


17.91 


- 


9. $9 


327.50 


Ellen F. Whitney 


100.00 


6.28 


- 


3.20 


109 .1*8 


E. H. Rogers 


250.00 


19.17 


- 


8.U* 


277.31 


Ellen T. Trask 


200.00 


111.61* 


l*i.l*o 


8.16 


278. Uo 


Thomas Huddles ton 


200.00 


10.25 


. 


6.35 


216.60 


Joa Pacewicz 


Uoo.oo 


1*7.61* 


1*0.30 


12.31 


119.6$ 


Mary Susan Rice 


87 .27 


15.21 


- 


3.09 


105.57 


Julia A, Bemis 


300.00 


10. U8 


- 


9.38 


319.86 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


135.72 


- 


13.16 


1*1*8.88 


Elizabeth G. Ghapin 


300.00 


71.68 


- 


11.23 


382.91 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


13.20 


- 


6.UU 


219 .61* 


Agnes S. Brown 


300.00 


28.37 


- 


9.92 


338.29 


Lewis W. Woodworth 


150.00 


6.63 


- 


1*.71 


161. 3U 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


21.51* 


- 


9.71 


331.25 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


19.01* 


- 


9.61; 


328.68 


Mary James Scripture 


500.00 


30.1*7 


- 


16.02 


5U6.U9 


Charles P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


22.88 


- 


11.25 


381*. 13 


Helen 0. Storrow 


2,000-00 


186.29 


1*7.60 


6U.62 


2,203.31 


Elizabeth S. Wheeler 


200.00 


1U.92 


- 


6.U8 


221.U0 


John H. Wilkins 


675-00 


70.61 


- 


22.52 


768.13 


L.B. and A. E. Thiessen 500.00 


39.98 


- 


16.31 


556.29 


Paul Dorian 


150.00 


9.66 


- 


U.82 


16U.U8 


Raymond E. Hagerty 


150.00 


9.66 


- 


1.82 


l61i.U8 


Charles 0. Preble 


100.00 


U.68 


- 


3-15 


107.83 


George G. Tarbell 


Uoo.oo 


5.01 


- 


12.26 


1*17.27 


Eugene Sherman 


200.00 


- 


- 


- 


200.00 


Deposited in Suffolk 












Savings Bank 












J, Waldo Smith 


300.00 


2l*J*l* 


_ 


9.38 


333.82 


Charles S. Smith 


300.00 


28.26 


- 


9Ji9 


337.75 


Edward R. Farrar 


300.00 


13.33 


- 


9.06 


322.39 


Anne D. Pollard 


300.00 
$12,862.27 


13.02 
$1,782.08 


- 


9.06 
$1*23.89 $ 


322.08 




$355.00 


Hi, 713.21* 



50 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



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51 



FINANCE 



ASSESSORS 1 REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report for the year 
195U: 

All real estate and personal property tax abatement requests must 
be filed with the Board by October 1, of the year in question, accord- 
ing to law. 

All automobile excise tax abatement requests must be filed with the 
Board within six months of the date of issuance of the notice of ass- 
essment or of the date of the sale or transfer of the vehicle, but in 
any event not later than January 31 of the succeeding year. 

195?U Recapitulation 
Town: 

Total appropriations to be raised by taxation $L;00,256.5!? 

Total appropriations to be taken from available funds 6U,257.91 

$U6U,51U.U6 
State: Tax and Assessments 

Estimate Underestimate 

1. State Audit $1,525.23 

2. State parks & 

reservations 692 .01+ 153.97 

Totals #2,217.27 $153.97 2,371.2li 

County: 

1. County tax 12,126.7k 

2. T. B. Hospital 

assessments 2,853.19 257 J&k 

Totals $1U,979.93 $257.61; 15,237.57 

Overlay of Current Year 11,531; .1+9 

Gross Amount to be raised $U93,637»76 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

1. Income tax $27,567.82 

2. Corporation taxes 18,195.60 

3. Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 30,000.00 
U. Old Age Assistance 15,000.00 
5. Schools 16,166.19 
6.. Water Department 27,606.25 
7. Interest on Taxes & Assessments 2,300.00 
8 State Assistance for School 

Construction 5,000.00 

9* All Others 3,838.05 

$115,973 -91 



£> 



ASSESSORS 



Overestimates of previous year 
(available funds) 

a. County tax 325.89 

Amount voted from available funds 6U j 257 •?! 

#6Ii,583.BO 

Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds $210, 557 •71 

Net amount to be raised by taxation on polls 

and property 283,080.05 

Number of polls 8U0 @ $2.00 Poll tax $1,680.00 

Total valuation: 

Personal property $UUli,556 

Real estate $5>Ul7j9U5 Personal property §21,338.6° 
$5,862,501 Real estate 260,061.36 

Total taxes on Polls and Property &283,080»05 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed 8,7Ul 
Number of Dwelling Houses Assessed 77k 
Tax Rate per §1000 §U8 

George G. Tarbell, Chairman 
Arthur W. Rice, Jr. 
G. Arnold Wiley 

Board of Assessors 



53 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

During the year, 19 5U, the Commissioners of Trust Funds, to a 
considerable extent, deposited available cash in savings banks at 
the improved relatively attractive rate of 3^« 

In most cases the rate of return received in the Trusts under 
supervision of the Commissioners averaged at between 2.65$ and 2.76$, 
with the U.S.A. Series G Bonds paying 2-£%> and savings banks and some 
corporate bond issues yielding in the neighborhood of 3%» In those 
cases where the bonds included U.S.A. Ser. F. bonds, a somewhat higher 
yield results when the year's increment in value is added to income. 

After the purchase of First National Bank of Boston shares in the 
the DeCordova School Equipment Fund the law was changed to limit pur- 
chases to bonds and notes legal for savings banks in Massachusetts. 
As the First National Bank of Boston stock this year sold above the 
cost to this Fund, it was deemed prudent to sell the shares. 

On October 29, 195>U, the Middlesex Superior Court handed down, a 
decree directing that the Charles Sumner Smith Fund with accumulations 
be applied toward the cost of the proposed addition to the elementary 
school. 

The Trust Fund Commissioners accordingly reviewed the securities 
in this Fund and concluded to sell certain corporate bonds, which 
could be disposed of at a profit, rather than run the risk of a possi- 
ble decline in price. This was done and further sale of securities 
will be made as cash requirements dictate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Clement C. Sawtell 

Hilliam DeFord 

William T. King 



5U 



Protection of 
Persons ana Property 

REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herewith submit my report for the Police Department for the year 
ending December 31> 195>U. 

Arrests by Lincoln Police . . 60 

Arrests by State Police 2.8 

Total number of arrests ffB 

Arrests were made for the following offences: 

Crimes against the person: 

Assault and Battery 1 

Assault on Police Officer 1 

Conspiracy to steal 2 

Crimes against property: 

Breaking and entering and larceny . • 7 

Larceny 2 

Using a motor vehicle without 

authority 1 

Crimes against public order: 

Delinquency • 7 

Driving a motor vehicle to 

endanger life 12 

Driving a motor vehicle while 

intoxicated lU 

Driving after suspension of 

license 2 

Driving without a license 7 

Drunkenness 13 

Failing to stop for Police Officer., 1 
Leaving scene of accident after 

causing property damage.. 2 

Motor Vehicle Laws, Violating 5 

Neglect of Minor Child 1 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle •• 5 
Operating unregistered motor vehicle 5 

Violations of Motor Vehicle Laws reported to 
Registry of Motor Vehicles 35 



55 



PROTECTION 



Motor Vehicle accident report: 

Accidents reported 88 

Occupants injured 66 

Occupants killed 2 

Pedestrians injured 1 

I wish to thank the Concord Police Department for their help and 
co-operation throughout the past year. 

Since the local telephone office will be closing in the Spring, 
I wish to acknowledge their service to this department. Their ef- 
forts to serve the Police Department, and the Town of Lincoln, have 
t